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My husband decided to slam the door shut tonight.. on the driver side sliding door. On our 07 Sienna.. the driver side is completely manual.. and all I can find online is about the power door.. but that isn't our problem. When we shut it.. we can shut it enough to where it latches.. but there is still a good gap on the back of the door.. it's not flush like it should be.. and the lights won't turn off. I looked and there is a little button there that apparently needs to be pushed in by the door.. so it must not be reaching it. So, I put some tape over the button to keep it shut temporarily.. does anyone know what might have happened? We tried to look it over and can't find anything wrong. It seems like the latch on the back of the door isn't connecting.. but I don't know. Any ideas? Anything we can do? We really need our van it's too cold out to be driving around with the door cracked like that... air is getting in. And I have a 19 month old who rides in it.. I'm hoping we can fix it without it costing an arm and a leg!

Thanks!
 

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I have this problem also.
It seems like the rear clasp is out of sync with the front one.
I don't know how to release it - open it - so that it can close, and it's blocking the ability of the door to close.
My battery must be bad, because after a couple of hours open, the sensors drain my battery!
Any ideas anyone?
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna LE - Broken Side Door Latch (Metal Fatigue)

We experienced the same problem this weekend with our 2004 Sienna LE. The manual sliding door (driver side) failed to latch at the rear.

At first I didn't make sense. It looked like the rear latch was unbolted from the door but all three screws were still in the latch! This meant the metal on the door had failed allowing the latch to break free. After I took it apart my fear was confirmed.

Green Eye Door handle Metal


I searched the web to see if there was a recall but I could not find one. I did however, find a post were another individual described the fix - Thank You! However, there were no pictures or details so I've included the repair information here to assist others with the repair.

This is definitely a design flaw. Obviously, when the doors were stamped out at the factory there was not enough structure to secure the latch to the door. It was only a matter of time before the door failed. As you can see, the metal is less than 0.6 mm thick (0.024"). Hardly adequate to support a latching mechanism on a large door.

Screw Washer Fastener Auto part Nut


Gauge Calipers Measuring instrument Tool


Gauge Measuring instrument Tool Calipers Watch accessory



This is probably more of an issue with manual doors where they are repeatedly closed with varying degrees of force.

Parts required for the repair:

T30 Torx bit to remove the old screws from the latching mechanism.
3 - Hex head screws (M6-1.00x20) 6mm bolts, 1.00 thread pitch and 20 mm long (the original bolts are too short for the repair).
3 - Flat washers (1" O.D. x 5/16" I.D) or (25.4mm O.D. x 8mm I.D.)
10mm wrench or socket to install the new screws.
Loctite 242 (blue) - thread lock compound to prevent the new screws from vibrating loose.

Note - When taking the old screws out of the door latch, keep the broken door material. They make perfect spacers to align the door latch when reinstalled!

I did not have to take the door apart to make this repair

1. Remove the top Torx screw from the door latch (save the broken door material).
2. Temporarily install one of the new screws in the top hole. This will keep the latch from falling down while you remove the remaining screws and start the repair.
3. Remove the bottom two Torx screws (save the broken door material).
4. Place the flat washer on the screw then add the piece of broken door material (this will help align the latch).
5. Add a few drops of Loctite to the screw threads.
6. Screw the screw into one of the latch holes - Do not fully tighten at this time.
7. Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 for the remaining two screws.
8. The three new screws should be installed at this time.

Warning - I believe the torque spec for these screws is only 44 in-lbf (in-lbs NOT ft-lbs). Do not over tighten or you will destroy the door latch. Then you will have to take the door apart to make the repair!

Text Diagram Auto part Automotive window part Parallel


9. Gently snug the three screws then gently close the door.
10. Open the door and tighten any screws that may have loosened.
11. Gently close the door.
12. Open the door and tighten all three screws to spec.

Note - There is adequate clearance between the head of the screws and the door frame - no scratched paint!

Button Metal


This should complete the repair!

Maybe we will get lucky and this will turn into a safety/recall issue. Until then, this fix will allow you to drive your Sienna without worrying about the door flying open at highway speeds!

I'm convinced it's not a matter "if" you are going to have to make this repair but "when."

I hope this helps.

Paul T. Dorris
Barboursville, WV
 

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2005 Sienna - Our latch on the back door was stuck in the closed position. As said on the other thread, have someone hold the handle for the door in the open position and use a screw driver to push the latch into the open position. The latch is supposed to flip open when pulling on the door handle. As the vehicle ages the grease on the latch can dry up causing the latch to remain in the closed position making it impossible to close the back part of the door all the way. This used to happen on my dad's car years ago. To help the matter it is wise to put a few drops of light oil on the latch. I damaged mine somewhat by repeatedly trying to close the door.
 

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Our 2004 Sienna had the problem caused by the door metal failing and allowing the latch to break free. I was lucky that only the two bottom screws had broken through and the top one was still intact so I the latch was still aligned fairly well. I followed the instructions posted above by ptdorris and completed the repair in less than 15 minutes. Thank You Paul Dorris for the detailed instructions and the pictures!! What a great person you are for taking the time to post your information to help others!
 

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Paul T Dorris, you are amazing. I only wish I would have found this thread 2-3 years ago!

My (former) Toyota dealer said that "the weld was broken and the door would have to be replaced." Um, no thank you was my reply.

Now on to that AC unit that stopped working on my drive from Atlanta to St. Louis in mid-August...
 

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Thank you ptdorris. I had the same problem that started last week. Took that to the dealer who told me to replace the whole door and gave an estimate of $3500. Brought the car back as it is and followed the instructions in this post today evening. Took me an hour to complete the whole thing. 10 min for the rear latch and extra time for the front one which needed some degreasing and lube as it was stuck. But what a relief.
 

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Thanks ptdorris. This is a design flaw, but I think it is also partially attributable to the poor design of the center hinge. As the center hinge begins to fail (and they will fail) the door will sag and unduely stress the rear latch.

I would suggest fixing the center hinges when they syart tshow signs of failure (i.e. noisy closing, door hitting frame when opening and closing, hinge scratching paint below the hinge rail).

The center hinge on the manual door and automatic door are very easy and easy to replace, respectively (good how-to videos are available on YouTube). This may help prevent or at least postpone the rear latch failure issue.
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna LE - Broken Side Door Latch (Metal Fatigue)

We experienced the same problem this weekend with our 2004 Sienna LE. The manual sliding door (driver side) failed to latch at the rear.

At first I didn't make sense. It looked like the rear latch was unbolted from the door but all three screws were still in the latch! This meant the metal on the door had failed allowing the latch to break free. After I took it apart my fear was confirmed.

View attachment 4000

I searched the web to see if there was a recall but I could not find one. I did however, find a post were another individual described the fix - Thank You! However, there were no pictures or details so I've included the repair information here to assist others with the repair.

This is definitely a design flaw. Obviously, when the doors were stamped out at the factory there was not enough structure to secure the latch to the door. It was only a matter of time before the door failed. As you can see, the metal is less than 0.6 mm thick (0.024"). Hardly adequate to support a latching mechanism on a large door.

View attachment 4001

View attachment 4002

View attachment 4003


This is probably more of an issue with manual doors where they are repeatedly closed with varying degrees of force.

Parts required for the repair:

T30 Torx bit to remove the old screws from the latching mechanism.
3 - Hex head screws (M6-1.00x20) 6mm bolts, 1.00 thread pitch and 20 mm long (the original bolts are too short for the repair).
3 - Flat washers (1" O.D. x 5/16" I.D) or (25.4mm O.D. x 8mm I.D.)
10mm wrench or socket to install the new screws.
Loctite 242 (blue) - thread lock compound to prevent the new screws from vibrating loose.

Note - When taking the old screws out of the door latch, keep the broken door material. They make perfect spacers to align the door latch when reinstalled!

I did not have to take the door apart to make this repair

1. Remove the top Torx screw from the door latch (save the broken door material).
2. Temporarily install one of the new screws in the top hole. This will keep the latch from falling down while you remove the remaining screws and start the repair.
3. Remove the bottom two Torx screws (save the broken door material).
4. Place the flat washer on the screw then add the piece of broken door material (this will help align the latch).
5. Add a few drops of Loctite to the screw threads.
6. Screw the screw into one of the latch holes - Do not fully tighten at this time.
7. Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 for the remaining two screws.
8. The three new screws should be installed at this time.

Warning - I believe the torque spec for these screws is only 44 in-lbf (in-lbs NOT ft-lbs). Do not over tighten or you will destroy the door latch. Then you will have to take the door apart to make the repair!

View attachment 4005

9. Gently snug the three screws then gently close the door.
10. Open the door and tighten any screws that may have loosened.
11. Gently close the door.
12. Open the door and tighten all three screws to spec.

Note - There is adequate clearance between the head of the screws and the door frame - no scratched paint!

View attachment 4004

This should complete the repair!

Maybe we will get lucky and this will turn into a safety/recall issue. Until then, this fix will allow you to drive your Sienna without worrying about the door flying open at highway speeds!

I'm convinced it's not a matter "if" you are going to have to make this repair but "when."

I hope this helps.

Paul T. Dorris
Barboursville, WV
You are a F*#%ing HERO!!! Thank you so much for your wonderful post.
 
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