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The power sliding door cable on my 2011 Seinna was broken, the repair fee is more than $1000. Toyota Canada replied that they use best material. I don't why best material can only work for 7 years. Now I can only manually open & close the door. 7 years will it be possible ?
Please put into your consideration.
 

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Maintenance is the key to long life. I just got done with a two day care session to get the doors on my 3 year old van to run right again. Track cleaning, back of door cable take-up and dispense reel lubrication, roller lubrication, rubber seals cleaning and dressing, etc.

If you don't take care of it (either yourself or periodically pay someone to take care of it), it will eventually break. The cost of maintaining is far less than the cost of rebuilding it.
 

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It also depends on your usage, how often you open/close it.


Not sure if there's any merit but I let the door slide all the way when opening or closing. I would think the cable would take a beating when interrupting it midway going in the opposite direction.
 

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Maintenance is the key to long life. I just got done with a two day care session to get the doors on my 3 year old van to run right again. Track cleaning, back of door cable take-up and dispense reel lubrication, roller lubrication, rubber seals cleaning and dressing, etc.

If you don't take care of it (either yourself or periodically pay someone to take care of it), it will eventually break. The cost of maintaining is far less than the cost of rebuilding it.
Can you share how you did the maintenance on the doors?
 

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My observations and methodology - Not factory backed!!!

Basically.... We have three sets of tracks and rollers (two in front - top and bottom) and one in the rear at the center just below the rear window. We also have latches at the front and at the rear.

The top/bottom rollers/tracks at the front just follow their guides and support the weight of the door. Keep the tracks clean and lightly greased, and spray the bearings in the rollers so that they move freely.

The assembly at the center rear of the door is more complex. This guide roller set is hard to lubricate without a very long straw on your spray can. It also has a spring loaded hinge that navigates the final turn to help pull the rear of the door into the body. I found that stiffness in that hinge was keeping my door from closing 100% (would stop and reverse at 90% closed). Lube this hinge well. This assembly also contains the take-up and play-out pulleys for the cable line that moves the doors along. My pulleys and the frame were rusting, and I really don't think they were moving the cable along well.

NOTE: While I want to tell you to lube this well too, there may be some risk to what I've been doing. The cable has a flexible plastic outer sheath, and some plastics can be damaged/weakened by some lube chemistry. So while mine now moves like new, it's possible that I'll pay a price a few years from now when the plastic breaks down! Maybe someone can offer some advice here?

In addition, use rubber seal dressing on all the gaskets. If they are not dark black and supple, the doors won't seal well, or be held in place when closed. Those seals keep the doors from rattling like crazy when you drive. But you don't want them to be overly 'tacky', or you'll strain the motor when trying to open the door.

I also carefully spray a little lube into the latch assemblies to keep them moving freely.

Hope this helps.
 
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I just replaced my cable assembly today due to a faulty reinstallation after the door had been removed by a body shop after getting hit in the quarter panel. This repair is a piece of cake, it took about an hour, and that was while wrenching with my 7-yr-old daughter and having her undo and retighten most of the fasteners. Here's the part(s) you'll need:

Driver's side:
85016-08011 Cable Sub-Assembly Powe
Passenger's side:
85015-08011 Cable Sub-Assembly Powe

both pieces were $27.98/each at the site I usually buy parts from.
I used this video walkthrough on youtube:

This was such an easy repair, you only need a 10mm socket with a short extender, a phillips screwdriver and a panel detachment kit (if you care about neatly removing the single clip and the door panel, otherwise you can just use a screwdriver and f-up your paint).

Watch the video in its entirety before even ordering parts to get a feel for the "difficulty" of the project. I'd also recommend detaching the end cap shown around time marker 5:17 before you order the replacement cable assembly to see if you break yours like the guy in the video broke his (I broke mine also). This will save you on having to order the piece separately in the future and paying shipping on it (like me haha).

Molding:
68374-08020 - Driver's side
68373-08020 - Passenger's side
 

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I cleaned the tracks on my 2013 Limited AWD as recommended by fibber2 in post 6. I confirm the door does seem to operate quieter, don’t think it’s in my head! There is no way a car wash gets up in the track so I am sure this is the first time they have been cleaned. I used Spray Nine which is sold at the big box stores. In terms of lube, I did not lube the tracks like fibber2 did as I don’t think it is the right way to go but it would be great if someone has a factory service manual and could correct one of us. My theory is that the wheels are nylon like, just like newer garage door wheels, and with garage doors you should never lubricate the track the wheels roll on as it does not make sense to create a slippery roadway for the wheel to roll on. I didn’t lubricate the hinges as I don’t have any lube or a tool for lube or know exactly where to apply it but that does seem to make a lot of sense. I did notice two unusual things with my doors when doing this project but will start a new thread so I don’t hijack this one.
 

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2011 LE, 3.5L FWD at ~140K.

For the OP: yep, 7 years is all I got, too. I did a little failure analysis, and yes- the plastic wrapper got scuffed, and then the cable corroded, unraveled a bit, then parted. BUT:

"This repair is a piece of cake, it took about an hour..." +1 for Graure, that's about how long it took me (and also how much it cost me for the part). I used that same video as my guide. Get a set of nylon clip removal tools (e.g. $7 from Harbor Freight), as they will help a lot with door panel and rear cover removal. I did not break the clip on either side.


Dolph: "...theory is that the wheels are nylon..." They are are a stainless steel roller bearing with a thin nylon tire. After 7 years PA road salt et al and no track cleaning program, the track on mine was remarkably clean. Adding grease to that track would only attract dirt and problems IMO. A spritz of WD40 on the roller bearing itself would be fine, but apply surgically, not liberally.

Speaking of the nylon tire- I also had to replace the middle/aft hinge, as the bearing there had sagged, causing the entire door to sag and not seat properly. In the process of doing so, the door dropped (OH NO!) and the upper bearing got into a side-load bind, which essentially gave the roller a 'flat tire.' (GAAAAHHH!!!) The door worked, but with a 'thudthudthudthud' while moving. Using the same part source as above for the cable, and after reviewing the parts diagrams there, I just bought a new roller bracket (I think it was <$20) and installed in maybe 15 minutes. Use a magic marker to outline the old part before removal, and put the new part in the same location. Easy-peasy.

Dealership prices for fixing doors (~$1000+) can make you think black magic and animal sacrifice is needed for any fix. It's not (or at least it's not required :) ). You can do this with some pretty basic tools and skills.
Hope this helps.

FWIW, the Chilton manual subscription (for doors and everything else) can be both a help and hindrance- the instruction layout is awful, but the diagrams help.
 

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The power sliding door cable on my 2011 Seinna was broken, the repair fee is more than $1000. Toyota Canada replied that they use best material. I don't why best material can only work for 7 years. Now I can only manually open & close the door. 7 years will it be possible ?
Please put into your consideration.
I know I am two years too late to this discussion, but I wanted to point out to anyone who reads this thread later when trying to find a solution for a broken slider cable on a 3rd gen Sienna that if you are even halfway handy you can get the parts to fix this yourself for under $50 and it takes under 2 hours to complete. The dealer price is ridiculous. I own two Siennas, a 2006 and a 2011. The older one had both cables broken and a latch motor burned out and I fixed it all for about $160 CDN using YouTube tutorials. Recently my 2011 suffered the same fate on the driver's side slider. The redesigned cable drive on the 3rd gen is even easier to replace and you can find the whole assembly required online for under $30 US. Unless you are completely clueless with tools there really is no excuse to pay a dealer $1-2000 to fix this issue.
 

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How to remove the rear window trim piece without breaking it?
Also what the part number is in case I break it during the installation.

Thank you
 

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"Sliding door cables are under excessive stress when fully opened because the rubber stopper was installed at incorrect position at factory."
 

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About to tackle this job on my 2011 Sienna with 143k miles. The driver side cable snapped about 2 weeks ago. I placed an order for the part and initially was delayed till around Christmas time but the part arrived early. I agree that trim piece at the rear of the window is a PITA to remove. The back end popped off but the front won't come loose, had to break it. Thanks for the part number on that molding piece. Suppose to push the part forward to loosen but it won't budge.
 

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Are you all beyond 10 years from in-service date? Hinges, cables & latches all have extended coverage programs. Even if you are, call Toyota first and ask for coverage.
 

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I am beyond 10 years at 143xxx mileage. It wasn't too bad, spent a long time cleaning the door panel. Not sure if it matters but I needed to install the rear cables first then install the front cable. I am ready for the other side to snap :confused:
And the part is surprisingly inexpensive. $35 shipped.
 
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