Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

We’re shopping around before we move back to the Midwest and we’re going to get a used Sienna. After doing some research I’ve stumbled on two road blocks that I wanted to get opinions on from people who actually have Sienna’s.

Is the direct injection engine (2017) the best way to go or is the older 2016 engine more reliable in the long run? We plan to keep it for as long as it’ll run, granted it’ll be used (under 50K miles at the most), but we really want to get the most out of it.

Also, being that we’re going to the Midwest, is it better to get AWD or will it really not matter for the extra price hike associated with it? The big fear I have is not having a spare tire and run flats are expensive to replace (I know it rarely happens but I’d rather be safe than sorry), but AWD seems like it would be smart, unless they are prone to more problems than FWD (any feedback from this?).

Any info helps, simply looking for input and feedback. Thanks everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Also, being that we’re going to the Midwest, is it better to get AWD ... seems like it would be smart, unless they are prone to more problems than FWD (any feedback from this?).
The Midwest has micro climates. AWD makes sense down wind from a great lake or living in a swamp but not so much everywhere else. Keep in mind AWD doesn't like different size tires (it breaks), even if the difference is from your slacking at tire rotation. Snow tires (I've never needed) make more sense 99.99% of the time.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
The powertrain in the 2016 is bulletproof. The Atkinson cycle DI engine coupled to the 8 speed seems to be 'smoothing out' now (2019) in terms of reliability and driveability (it only took a few TSB's for software updates and a rebuild program for problematic units to get there....). But you are looking at a 2017 (first year) so you'd better be sure it performs well and has had all of it's juvenile shots, or walk away.

Corrected statement thanks to Geezer1: You would have to move up to a 2018 to get Toyota Safety Sense as standard equipment. Previously I said the 2017 had this system.

Be very picky when you drive a 2017 and select very carefully. Ask for a print from the service department to see what issues the previous owner had and what repairs were done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
The 2GR-FKS in the 2017 and above Sienna has been in service since 2015 in the Lexus GS and RX with very good track record. The issues mostly faced are with the coupling to the 8spd, but as mentioned, TSB have pretty much got all the bugs out. I do agree that if you are looking for a 2017, just make sure it has all the latest updates performed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
On the plus side, the 2017's came equipped with Toyota Safety Sense as standard equipment.

Net: 2017's are safer if you land a good one. Be very picky when you drive a 2017 and select very carefully. Ask for a print from the service department to see what issues the previous owner had and what repairs were done.
Unfortunately, 2018 was the first model year that the Sienna got standard Safety Sense. You can view the brochures for previous model years at http://www.auto-brochures.com/toyota.html

The 2011-2017 Sienna Limited FWD with the Advanced Technology Package had several of the Safety Sense features but the automatic emergency braking is an older version that doesn't sense pedestrians and there is no lane keeping assist. (A 2011-2017 Limited with ATP can be difficult to find.)

The 2018 was quite an upgrade for all Sienna trims. Hill Start Assist Control which was previously only available in the advanced tech package became standard - cool feature that keeps the brakes on after you move your foot to the gas pedal. The 2018 can also be upgraded to Apple CarPlay by a Toyota dealer ... it became standard for 2019.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the help! I’ll definitely keep all of this in mind and see what’s available in the area as we get out there!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
I keep Geezer1 around to keep me focused and on track. Without him correcting my mistakes, this board would be a real mess!

Sorry about that. Safety Sense = 2018 and up.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
I was wondering how I managed to get that wrong, so I went back to the shopping experience we had this past year. Sure enough, TSS-P (PCS w/PD, LDW w/SA, AHB, DRCC, etc.) were all introduced as standard equipment on all models of the 2017 RAV4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
I have a 2018 AWD, and I really like the engine / transmission combo, but as others have mentioned there were issues in the earlier production units (2017 into early / mid 2018, I think)

As for AWD...I have it, it works pretty well, and with snow tires i can go just about anywhere that clearance isn’t a factor. BUT...I’m not convinced it is necessary. If you think you “need” AWD, then you probably need snow tires (AWD doesn’t help you stop)...and if you have snow tires, you probably can get away without AWD in almost all situations.

Don’t get me wrong, AWD helps, but it comes at a cost. More expensive to buy, more expensive to drive (not a lot, but fuel economy does suffer some), more expensive to maintain, and it also eats up 100 lbs (or so) of cargo carrying capacity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I have a 2018 AWD, and I really like the engine / transmission combo, but as others have mentioned there were issues in the earlier production units (2017 into early / mid 2018, I think)

As for AWD...I have it, it works pretty well, and with snow tires i can go just about anywhere that clearance isn’t a factor. BUT...I’m not convinced it is necessary. If you think you “need” AWD, then you probably need snow tires (AWD doesn’t help you stop)...and if you have snow tires, you probably can get away without AWD in almost all situations.

Don’t get me wrong, AWD helps, but it comes at a cost. More expensive to buy, more expensive to drive (not a lot, but fuel economy does suffer some), more expensive to maintain, and it also eats up 100 lbs (or so) of cargo carrying capacity.
That’s exactly what I was wanting to know from other owners, I like the AWD feature but from what I’ve heard it’s not necessary if I go with a good set of snow tires and don’t go anywhere crazy, which I don’t plan to do since we’ll be in the Midwest and not back in CO where we used to live (saw you’re a Denver guy!). Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Well I had your exact same decision when I was buying new and I made sure I got a 2016, specifically because of direct injection.

When talking about direct injection, Consumer Reports say "Cars with this technology might end up in the repair shop more frequently."

From extra carbon deposits to LSPI, the improvements DI gives were not worth it to me. Just google "direct injection LSPI" and read some of the mountain of information out there about it.

Maybe Toyota walks on water. Maybe they always get it right. Hey, I bought my Toyota for a really long life. A really long BORING life. I'll survive without the extra HP's. I understand why it could be better though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
This is exactly why I’m leaning towards 2016, wanted to see what everyone thought ofnthen2017 and if the DI was worth it but after reading more into it and hearing back from owners the 2016 is the way we’re going. Thank you for your input!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Okay, let’s clear this myth up. Toyota’s implementation of direct injection does NOT suffer from carbon build up. Again it does NOT have carbon build up like other manufacturers. The reason for this is that their direct injection still also has port fuel injection as well. It is a dual injection system, unlike the single only direct injection system of other manufacturers. The fuel from the port injection part of the system still cleans and removes the carbon build up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,466 Posts
This is exactly why I’m leaning towards 2016, wanted to see what everyone thought ofnthen2017 and if the DI was worth it but after reading more into it and hearing back from owners the 2016 is the way we’re going. Thank you for your input!!
Don't exclude the 2018 if one falls into your lap. The additional standard safety technology in the 2018 is totally worth it and the 2018 can be upgraded by the dealer to CarPlay. The OP in a recent thread bought an ex-Hertz rental 2018 Sienna: https://www.siennachat.com/threads/2018-sienna-cannot-change-clock-manually-nor-does-it-display-time.62615/

Some people seem to be scared of buying ex-rental vehicles but I've never understood why. I've never abused a rental car and have never known anyone who has. Rental cars are at least maintained according to the maintenance schedule which is more than many privately owned vehicle are.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
541 Posts
don't forget the $2500 awd pinion bearing seal repair issue that has been discussed here ......FWD sienna with a good set of snow tires will take you anywhere....I run a set of snow tires from late oct-april I am up in jersey and am pretty happy with the setup...

javvy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Wow...this is a very knowledgeable group...I am very limited in my car knowledge but have narrowed my next car purchase down to a 2018 - 2020 sienna SE Fwd drive and would like to purchase relatively soon. I am curious reading about direct injection and transmission shifting if newer is or isn’t better. Keep in mind I have a current 2010 Toyota with enough technology to listen to music and make calls via blue tooth. I drove a 2019 sienna and while I liked the lane keeping assistant which seemed to warn and gently correct line crossing and the blind spot warning seemed worth it’s weight in gold...no more second guessing what’s next to you, I worry I could be getting a little too technical and setting up for more issues to worry about breaking down the road compared to an older vehicle. Anyone want to comment on the potential pluses and minuses of the latest Siennas and if it’s a wise decision to trade in the good and faithful, lower technology 2010?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,427 Posts
.......The OP in a recent thread bought an ex-Hertz rental 2018 Sienna.......... Some people seem to be scared of buying ex-rental vehicles but I've never understood why. I've never abused a rental car and have never known anyone who has. Rental cars are at least maintained according to the maintenance schedule which is more than many privately owned vehicle are.
We just took that plunge while assisting our kid this summer to get a car. We ended up with a 2018 Toyota RAV4 XLE with the Extra Value Pkg. About 10 months old with 20,200 miles in superb condition for around 68% of it's original MSRP. It had been a rental fleet vehicle.

Now I will admit that I tend to drive rental cars harder than I would my own, but cars are tough to kill these days. But still, we drove quite a few RAVs this summer before finding the 'best of breed' to actually buy.

About rentals: Toyota has a program called H6 Fleet Rental that outlines their sales and buyback T's & C's. They are pretty careful about what they take back, servicing requirements, reconditioning (like brakes), warranty to subsequent buyers, which dealers in your district get an opportunity to buy & sell them, etc. Frankly, after looking at similar cars sold by a Toyota store about 50 miles from me vs. what the Rental Car companies were selling, it was pretty clear that buying a Toyota repurchase was less expensive, looked and felt better, and had a better warranty. The best of them become Toyota CPO vehicles, so you get a number of warranty enhancements over even buying new.

We'll see if theory holds......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hey all,

We’re shopping around before we move back to the Midwest and we’re going to get a used Sienna. After doing some research I’ve stumbled on two road blocks that I wanted to get opinions on from people who actually have Sienna’s.

Is the direct injection engine (2017) the best way to go or is the older 2016 engine more reliable in the long run? We plan to keep it for as long as it’ll run, granted it’ll be used (under 50K miles at the most), but we really want to get the most out of it.

Also, being that we’re going to the Midwest, is it better to get AWD or will it really not matter for the extra price hike associated with it? The big fear I have is not having a spare tire and run flats are expensive to replace (I know it rarely happens but I’d rather be safe than sorry), but AWD seems like it would be smart, unless they are prone to more problems than FWD (any feedback from this?).

Any info helps, simply looking for input and feedback. Thanks everyone!
I will go for the 2017 or higher since the 2017 engine has more power. I have been driving the 2019 XLE AWD for almost a year and I do not see any engine issue. I own two Honda Odyssey in the past and they are great. I ditched Odyssey because they do not offer AWD and their new style just not my type.
You are right, run flats are sucks. After 17K miles, two RF toasted at the same time. I drove 40 miles to the nearest Costco and the driving experience was terrible. I don't think I can drive any further because the car start shaking and very noisy. I replaced all 4 with Michelin Premier A/S at Costco. The ride comfort was day and night, the regular tires are 20% more comfortable than the RFT in my opinion. Now I have to look for a full size spare since I will be driving to the West soon.
BTW, my previous Odyssey drove over 250K miles, I expect the Sienna to do the same base on my research.😏
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top