Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just changed oil for my 2017 sienna. The oil filter from Walmart has two o ring come with it. One big one small. Guess the big is around the oil filter cap. However when taken off the old filter, didn't find any o ring on it.
Is it the new design?
I noticed my oil filter cap is made of plastic not metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
There should always be an o ring around the base of the oil filter housing at the end of the threads. The big one goes there. The little one is for the little cap in the middle of the bottom of the housing that is used to drain the oil filter housing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
There should always be an o ring around the base of the oil filter housing at the end of the threads. The big one goes there. The little one is for the little cap in the middle of the bottom of the housing that is used to drain the oil filter housing.
That's wjat I thought too. But I checked I this video here and didn't see when he replaced a o ring. Although he did mention, apply fresh oil around o ring.


I'm worrying if o ring shouldn't be there , it may cause space in the cap and slow leak.
Mine is a plastic cap btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
There should always be an o ring around the base of the oil filter housing at the end of the threads. The big one goes there. The little one is for the little cap in the middle of the bottom of the housing that is used to drain the oil filter housing.
So if it should put an o ring, can I put it on next 6000 mile oil change, since I didn't find any o ring in the old cap, and old cap runs fine so far without leak, and it's performed by a dealer mechanic in NJ half a year ago with a sticker on the windshield saying next oil change should be 5k mile later, the oil change I did is actually just 5k after last change. A bit premature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
You need to put on the o-ring or it can leak. Worst part is you don’t know when it will leak. It could start to leak while you are driving on the freeway without you knowing and cause damage to your engine. The engine is metal and the housing is plastic. They will expand and contract due to heat at different rates. Although it doesn’t leak now, but you will never know when it will leak. If it leaks while you are driving, you won’t know it. While Driving the oil PSI is around 30 to 40 PSI. Enough pressure to force all the oil out the leak very quickly at speed. You won’t know it while driving until the oil light comes on, which means it’s probably already too late to stop in time. That would most likely mean damage to your engine. It’s easy enough to just remove the filter housing now and add the o-ring. Then just refill what little oil that was in the filter housing. Why risk it until the next oil change? That video does show an o ring. I took a screenshot and circled the o ring. As for the dealer, The guys who does the oil changes are the ones that are unskilled to fix cars. The mechanics don’t do oil changes since it’s no money for them. The dealer usually hands it out to the unskilled teenager who’s has no other skills to change the oil. I wouldn’t go back.
45580
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You need to put on the o-ring or it can leak. Worst part is you don’t know when it will leak. It could start to leak while you are driving on the freeway without you knowing and cause damage to your engine. The engine is metal and the housing is plastic. They will expand and contract due to heat at different rates. Although it doesn’t leak now, but you will never know when it will leak. If it leaks while you are driving, you won’t know it. While Driving the oil PSI is around 30 to 40 PSI. Enough pressure to force all the oil out the leak very quickly at speed. You won’t know it while driving until the oil light comes on, which means it’s probably already too late to stop in time. That would most likely mean damage to your engine. It’s easy enough to just remove the filter housing now and add the o-ring. Then just refill what little oil that was in the filter housing. Why risk it until the next oil change? That video does show an o ring. I took a screenshot and circled the o ring. As for the dealer, The guys who does the oil changes are the ones that are unskilled to fix cars. The mechanics don’t do oil changes since it’s no money for them. The dealer usually hands it out to the unskilled teenager who’s has no other skills to change the oil. I wouldn’t go back.
View attachment 45580

Thanks hangman
If I jack up my car now and take oil filter off, only the engine oil in the filter will come out?
Not all the 5 quart in whole engine?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
The oil in the engine will be in the oil pan. I don’t know exactly how much oil will come out, but most of that oil will be in the oil pan. I would just have a few quarts of oil to refill just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
...I noticed my oil filter cap is made of plastic not metal.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
It's a matter of money and experience. They got your money and you got the experience. I think they all come with plastic housings. A metal one is available for about $23 on Amazon.
45582
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
The oil in the engine will be in the oil pan. I don’t know exactly how much oil will come out, but most of that oil will be in the oil pan. I would just have a few quarts of oil to refill just in case.
A really fruitful morning.
Took off the filter cap this morning, torque too much and heard crispy clear sound, I btoke it! Went to advanced auto get a metal cap, $26 after tax.
now this time it has both o ring pre installed.
Two lesson learned,
1. Original factory setting is plastic! Toyota tried every inch to save cost.
2. Dealer does not always do a proper job. That o ring should always be there.
45583
45584
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
It's a matter of money and experience. They got your money and you got the experience. I think they all come with plastic housings. A metal one is available for about $23 on Amazon.
View attachment 45582
I'm really starting to question if DIY is helpful or not. There's. Sunoco gas station around us offer "$8 oil change", I provide oil and parts. Don't think they can crack the cap like I did, if they crack, they gonna make up for it right. But again, how thr hell I know they put that o ring on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Sorry to read about the cracked plastic housing. I wished they had stayed with the metal housing instead of switching to the plastic housing. My 2011 and 2015 both comes with metal housing from factory. My 2020 however, comes with the plastic housing. First thing I did at 1000 miles was to replace the oil to get rid of any materials int he oil from the new engine and replaced the plastic one with the metal housing. Glad to hear that you were able to replace it with the metal housing and now have the proper o-rings in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
...changing oil on the Sienna almost requires a torque wrench!

Maybe there's hope: Toyota went back to the traditional "can" oil filter, from the housing/element design, on my '19 Prius. Good old FO-1 size.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
I'm really starting to question if DIY is helpful or not. There's. Sunoco gas station around us offer "$8 oil change", I provide oil and parts. Don't think they can crack the cap like I did, if they crack, they gonna make up for it right. But again, how thr hell I know they put that o ring on.
Well, I do DIY because I know it is done right. I have several experiences with bad oil changes that will never make me trust the dealer oil changes again.

In my 2011 Sienna, I always brought the van in to do oil changes that was covered under the free 2 year Toyota Care program. Under the program, Toyota does not change the Oil at the first visit @ 5000 miles. They only change it at the 10,000 mile and 20K mile visits. Well, I always change the oil of all my vehicles at the first 1000 miles to remove any shavings and then at 5000 miles again. Then I would bring it into toyota to change it at 10K miles since it is free. Then I would change the oil myself at 15K miles. Well, I found out that the dealer never changed the filter at the 10K mile oil change that they performed, even they state in the paperwork that they did. I know this for a fact because when I change the oil at 1000 and at 5000 miles, I used a K&N oil filter, not the OEM filter. If the dealer had change the filter like they were suppose to at 10K miles, they would have replaced that with an OEM filter. However, when I change the oil at 15K miles, my K&N filter was still in the filter housing! Proof that they never did change the filter at the 10K mile service.

In my Corvette, in the first visit to the dealer for its first scheduled oil change at 500 miles (Corvettes require first oil change at 500 miles), when I got home and parked the car, I saw a puddle of oil under the car. The tech did not screw in the oil filter tight and oil was leaking out of the filter. Good thing the dealer was only 1 mile from my house, so when I check the oil, it was only 1 quart low from the drive home. I went ahead and did another oil and filter change anyways just to make sure everything was redone correctly.

The second time I went in for another free oil change with the Vette, the tech was not familiar with dry sump engines and was unaware that my Vette has a dry sump engine, so he overfilled it by about 2 quarts of oil. Unsurprisingly, this is not uncommon so I was already aware that this may have happen, so I checked the oil level (according to the procedures for a dry sump engine) and sure enough it was over filled. Talk tot he service manager about how crappy their service was and made them drain the extra oil and I rechecked to make sure before I drove home. Extra oil is actually very bad for the car. In a dry sump engine, the extra oil can overflow into the intake and burn along with the fuel and foul the plugs and O2 sensors and make a mess of the engine. In a regular engine (wet sump) too much oil can cause the crank shaft to whip air into the oil and cause it to foam (like how you whip milk to make foam for coffee). This foam is then sent through the engine instead of actualy oil. Since the foam is made mostly of air, it causes oil starvation int he engine and destroy it.

After these experiences, I never trust dealers again...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Sorry to read about the cracked plastic housing. I wished they had stayed with the metal housing instead of switching to the plastic housing. My 2011 and 2015 both comes with metal housing from factory. My 2020 however, comes with the plastic housing. First thing I did at 1000 miles was to replace the oil to get rid of any materials int he oil from the new engine and replaced the plastic one with the metal housing. Glad to hear that you were able to replace it with the metal housing and now have the proper o-rings in place.
Yeah, not too bad a day, Metal is always better and never put 100% trust on dealer or mechanic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
the first-1,000-mile-oil-change is FAKE NEWS, it only became a thing after the Internet was created by Al Gore, before then, it was 3,000 mile oil changes. Toyota engineers are idiots when it came to my right side sliding door. But I'm not smarter than them when it comes to dependable engines. Just ask GM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
Metal or NonMetal, you will always have a hard time removing the oil-filter housing if it over torqued, more so on a cold engine. There is a reason we have torque specs. My Toyota manual (with metal housing) lists the Torque specs for an oil change as follows
  • Oil Drain Bolt - 30 ft-lbs (40 Nm)
  • Oil Filter Housing - 18 Ft-lbs (25 Nm)
  • Oil filter Drain Plug - 10 ft-lbs (13 Nm)
Invest in a decent Torque wrench, know these numbers (or double check your own manual).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I'm really starting to question if DIY is helpful or not. There's. Sunoco gas station around us offer "$8 oil change", I provide oil and parts. Don't think they can crack the cap like I did, if they crack, they gonna make up for it right. But again, how thr hell I know they put that o ring on.
I was going to say . What are you doing changing your own oil. Buying oil - doing job - disposal of oil.
Get coupons for jiffy lube, my buddy all ways getting a deal there.
i however am going to let dealer do mine. I just dropped off today for first change. By me that is. It’s a 2015
i don’t know how much its going to cost, maybe have attitude change after I see how much, but it’s all ways been dealer serviced so I figured I would try to keep it that way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
A really fruitful morning.
Took off the filter cap this morning, torque too much and heard crispy clear sound, I btoke it! Went to advanced auto get a metal cap, $26 after tax.
now this time it has both o ring pre installed.
Two lesson learned,
1. Original factory setting is plastic! Toyota tried every inch to save cost.
2. Dealer does not always do a proper job. That o ring should always be there.
View attachment 45583 View attachment 45584
Metal or NonMetal, you will always have a hard time removing the oil-filter housing if it over torqued, more so on a cold engine. There is a reason we have torque specs. My Toyota manual (with metal housing) lists the Torque specs for an oil change as follows
  • Oil Drain Bolt - 30 ft-lbs (40 Nm)
  • Oil Filter Housing - 18 Ft-lbs (25 Nm)
  • Oil filter Drain Plug - 10 ft-lbs (13 Nm)
Invest in a decent Torque wrench, know these numbers (or double check your own manual).
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top