Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

21 - 40 of 71 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
As for abysmal FCA reliability, FCA is the leading seller of minivans. If it really was that bad, no one would be buying them.
I love the looks of the Pacifica. I just cant get over the fact that its a Chrysler. I just dont trust them. FCA sells a ton of Dodge Caravans because they are the cheapest option in the segment but they are complete garbage.

Kia on the other hand is a good option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
There are vents, but low mounted. One of the best things about minivans are the roof vents. As for abysmal FCA reliability, FCA is the leading seller of minivans. If it really was that bad, no one would be buying them. Anyway, what's it hurt to check it out? I'm in the market and I'm checking out all the minivans. Even the Kia Sedona when it comes out.
I wish that logic was true, but people buy bad vehicles (and other things) all the time. FCA sells because they are often the cheapest option and look good on day one. But show me a Journey, Caravan or 300 owner and I’ll show you a person not familiar with long-term decision making. For me the evidence is just look at 10 year old Sienna vs Caravan used asking prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
I've watched the Kia Carnival videos from Korea and it looks high tech! Hope the Sedona is like that when it comes to the USA. Anyway, I'm brand agnostic, I don't buy the brand I buy the model. Its serve me well so far. And you know what they say, variety is the spice of life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I get that. Everyone is going to have their own requirements. I’m coming from an Outback. I’m going to have more cargo room even without taking out the 2nd row. My father in law has a Pacifica if I need to haul something larger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Fair enough. The more I think about it, the more the non-removable second row is annoying....
I get that that’s a deal-breaker for some. The Chrysler (preferably used) with the stow-and-go seats is the solution for those with those kind of cargo needs.

However, the 2nd row seat bottoms do flip up (on most models?) and slide forward getting out of the way well enough for most.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,275 Posts
Kia on the other hand is a good option.
Not if you want to survive driving at night. All available headlight systems on the Kia Sedona were given the lowest "Poor" rating by the IIHS: 2020 Kia Sedona Minivan

We rented a Kia Sedona at the Seattle airport in January 2019. It was incredibly scary to drive at night which was even more difficult due to the constant rain. Granted, my night vision has likely declined. I was having to do things like drive 15 to 20 miles per hour in 35 mph zones in order to avoid hitting medians and to see lane lines and road edges..

After a couple of harrowing days/nights, we returned the Sedona to the rental agency for a replacement. This time I checked the IIHS headlight ratings on my cell phone for each replacement vehicle I was offered. I was offered several vehicles before I was offered one that had higher than a "Poor" or "Marginal" headlight rating. I accepted the first one I was offered that had an "Acceptable" headlight rating - 2019 Toyota Camry LE. The Camry headlights were just that - Acceptable and I could see fine with those.

Maybe Kia will improve the Sedona headlights during an upcoming model refresh. I sure wouldn't touch a Sedona if there is no improvement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Not if you want to survive driving at night. All available headlight systems on the Kia Sedona were given the lowest "Poor" rating by the IIHS: 2020 Kia Sedona Minivan

We rented a Kia Sedona at the Seattle airport in January 2019. It was incredibly scary to drive at night which was even more difficult due to the constant rain. Granted, my night vision has likely declined. I was having to do things like drive 15 to 20 miles per hour in 35 mph zones in order to avoid hitting medians and to see lane lines and road edges..

After a couple of harrowing days/nights, we returned the Sedona to the rental agency for a replacement. This time I checked the IIHS headlight ratings on my cell phone for each replacement vehicle I was offered. I was offered several vehicles before I was offered one that had higher than a "Poor" or "Marginal" headlight rating. I accepted the first one I was offered that had an "Acceptable" headlight rating - 2019 Toyota Camry LE. The Camry headlights were just that - Acceptable and I could see fine with those.

Maybe Kia will improve the Sedona headlights during an upcoming model refresh. I sure wouldn't touch a Sedona if there is no improvement.
Interesting. How did you like it other than that? I suspect they will address this in the 2022 refresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,275 Posts
Interesting. How did you like it other than that? I suspect they will address this in the 2022 refresh.
The awful headlights really colored my opinion of the Kia Sedona. It was otherwise probably OK enough. It was a base model so its interior was plain and it didn't have many of the convenience and safety features that my fully optioned 2014 Sienna Limited has. I particularly missed adaptive cruise control since we haven't owned a vehicle without it since 2014. I was REALLY happy to get the Sedona replaced with the Camry since the Camry had TSS-P which is mostly like the advanced tech package on my Sienna.

We didn't carry others in the Sedona - only my wife and me - so I can't comment on how well it works for that. I rented the Sedona thinking it would be nice for transporting five other family members so we could go to restaurants in one vehicle but nothing could beat dining at the nephew's house overlooking Puget Sound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
I get that that’s a deal-breaker for some. The Chrysler (preferably used) with the stow-and-go seats is the solution for those with those kind of cargo needs.

However, the 2nd row seat bottoms do flip up (on most models?) and slide forward getting out of the way well enough for most.
Oddly enough, I have had the specific need to transport a full sized sofa on 3-4 occasions, and anticipate it again soon lol. I thought no way, but the dimensions on paper said yes (2011 Odyssey) and turns out the numbers don’t lie - was just barely possible with second row out. Came in very handy, no need to borrow a truck and use tarps or other element-related considerations.

It’s just one thing, but was relevant. We are building a new house, and I’m seeing many trips moving mid to large sized objects in the near future.

Pacifica looks nice and has some cool features. But I can’t roll the dice with FCA given their record.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Not if you want to survive driving at night. All available headlight systems on the Kia Sedona were given the lowest "Poor" rating by the IIHS: 2020 Kia Sedona Minivan

We rented a Kia Sedona at the Seattle airport in January 2019. It was incredibly scary to drive at night which was even more difficult due to the constant rain. Granted, my night vision has likely declined. I was having to do things like drive 15 to 20 miles per hour in 35 mph zones in order to avoid hitting medians and to see lane lines and road edges..

After a couple of harrowing days/nights, we returned the Sedona to the rental agency for a replacement. This time I checked the IIHS headlight ratings on my cell phone for each replacement vehicle I was offered. I was offered several vehicles before I was offered one that had higher than a "Poor" or "Marginal" headlight rating. I accepted the first one I was offered that had an "Acceptable" headlight rating - 2019 Toyota Camry LE. The Camry headlights were just that - Acceptable and I could see fine with those.

Maybe Kia will improve the Sedona headlights during an upcoming model refresh. I sure wouldn't touch a Sedona if there is no improvement.
Seems like all I ever get when booking a minivan is the town and country.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
My personal list, trying to isolate differences please help me add to it:

Sienna
  • AWD
  • Far better mileage
  • New generation
  • Better aesthetics
  • Likely better resale
  • ‘Sport’ trim option
  • Front seat/console setup more attractive
  • Bird’s eye view
  • Higher ground clearance

Odyssey
  • Mid-cycle = gremlins worked out
  • More horsepower
  • Better driving dynamics
  • V6
  • Super smooth 10 speed transmission
  • Honda sensing a little better
  • All 2021 trim levels are available in Canada (Sienna Platinum not available)
  • Second row seats are removable
  • Wireless charging
I have no Experience with the 2021 Sienna other than hearing that is feels underpowered with the Hybrid engine, however I purchased a 2020 AWD SE Sienna with the nightshade package in July. I live in the mountains of northern Colorado and recently put a set of Nokian Hakkepillita studded snow tires on it and the thing is a tank. Black leather interior, premium sound... I would recommend to anyone. It’s averaging about 25 mpg with 300 hp. I love this vehicle and think something similar would be great for Canada.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I’m in the middle of deciding between these two myself. Haven’t test driven either yet, planning on it early next month. On paper, I am leaning more toward the Sienna. I have previously owned a 2004 Prius, I loved Toyota’s hybrid system. I have also owned a ‘93 accord, loved the Honda feel.

I like how the odyssey looks better.
However, head on over to the odyssey boards and you will see some chronic, fairly major issues going on since the 2018 model year.

I’m keeping an open mind when I go for my test drives, but between AWD, mpg, and the reliability factor, it will have to be something significant for me to choose the odyssey.
From my personal experience and ownership of Toyota vs Honda vehicles, I'd choose Toyota over Honda for transmission reliability. According to Scotty Kilmer - Honda always have transmission problem. Currently, I own 05' RAV4 (285K+ mi) and Sienna(145k mi)[both were bought NEW in 2004/5 and 06' Highlander Ltd (91200 mi).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
My personal list, trying to isolate differences please help me add to it:

Sienna
  • AWD
  • Far better mileage
  • New generation
  • Better aesthetics
  • Likely better resale
  • ‘Sport’ trim option
  • Front seat/console setup more attractive
  • Bird’s eye view
  • Higher ground clearance

Odyssey
  • Mid-cycle = gremlins worked out
  • More horsepower
  • Better driving dynamics
  • V6
  • Super smooth 10 speed transmission
  • Honda sensing a little better
  • All 2021 trim levels are available in Canada (Sienna Platinum not available)
  • Second row seats are removable
  • Wireless charging
Sadly, with a hybrid drivetrain only, personally I would go with the Honda. If a hybrid fits your needs, I'd go Toyota. I love Toyota, but I don't want a hybrid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
My wife and I test drove a 2020 Odyssey and a 2020 Sienna, and liked the Sienna hands down. Such a better drive and feel. By this I feel it’s power, shifting and responsiveness was significantly smoother. Another thing we like is being able to push second row back enough that entering/exiting the van and putting kids in that row is comfortable and spacious. We didn’t feel Odyssey provided that. We are waiting to try the 2021, but if not worth the extra costs, we’d go to a 2020 Sienna and not even consider an Odyssey. The 2020 Sienna is superior, although is an older box model.
Our debate is, I’ve seen people in forums say they were able to buy 2020 Sienna bargain deals. As an example, an XLE Premium for 37k. The same would cost 47k (with entertainment system) for a 2021. That’s 10k! If you drive 10-12k miles a year It’d take you over 20 years to break even. We don’t know if the 2021 is worth it. I am still waiting to test drive it before making the ultímate decisión, but it better really impress.
 

·
Registered
2020 Predawn Mica Gray Limited
Joined
·
58 Posts
Sadly, with a hybrid drivetrain only, personally I would go with the Honda. If a hybrid fits your needs, I'd go Toyota. I love Toyota, but I don't want a hybrid.
I’m not sure if you are referencing reliability or just a personal preference, but if it is reliability, Toyota hybrids are incredibly reliable.

My personal experience with having a 2007 Prius I recently sold with 348k on it (original trans & engine, just did oil changes every 10k and trans drain & fills every 50k) - hybrid batteries lasted 200k (1st) and 120k (2nd, remanufactured battery pack).

We also traded in our 2008 Highlander hybrid which had 219k on the original battery pack (same maintenance and I did the timing service at 140k)

Both ran great, and we took cross country family trips up until we sold/traded in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
My wife and I test drove a 2020 Odyssey and a 2020 Sienna, and liked the Sienna hands down. Such a better drive and feel. By this I feel it’s power, shifting and responsiveness was significantly smoother. Another thing we like is being able to push second row back enough that entering/exiting the van and putting kids in that row is comfortable and spacious. We didn’t feel Odyssey provided that. We are waiting to try the 2021, but if not worth the extra costs, we’d go to a 2020 Sienna and not even consider an Odyssey. The 2020 Sienna is superior, although is an older box model.
Our debate is, I’ve seen people in forums say they were able to buy 2020 Sienna bargain deals. As an example, an XLE Premium for 37k. The same would cost 47k (with entertainment system) for a 2021. That’s 10k! If you drive 10-12k miles a year It’d take you over 20 years to break even. We don’t know if the 2021 is worth it. I am still waiting to test drive it before making the ultímate decisión, but it better really impress.
When you break even comes down to how much you drive - the more, the earlier. If the people reporting 40+mpg are truthful, going to that from the 22mpg 2020 sienna for us (who drive probably 18-20K miles per year) is like $1500-2000 savings in gas per years (we are in Canada where gas is more).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
I wish that logic was true, but people buy bad vehicles (and other things) all the time. FCA sells because they are often the cheapest option and look good on day one. But show me a Journey, Caravan or 300 owner and I’ll show you a person not familiar with long-term decision making. For me the evidence is just look at 10 year old Sienna vs Caravan used asking prices.
But the Pacifica isn't a Caravan, nor a Journey. If reliability is so important, why would you even get a 2021, get a tried and true 2020.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
But the Pacifica isn't a Caravan, nor a Journey. If reliability is so important, why would you even get a 2021, get a tried and true 2020.
The Caravan has terrible reliability in general, but in particular in the 2011-2012 era, but actually got decent by end of the run, 2016 - 2019. The Pacifica scores 'far below average' for every year so far. Of course it has many other modern advantages over the Caravan, but it's certainly poorly made along with everything else FCA except some years of the Grand Cherokee.

Far be it from me to tell anyone how to spend their own money, but there is no world where FCA makes a more reliable product to the equivalent Honda or Toyota. They certainly have some cool features than the others don't however. Automated third row folding seats, stow and go etc.
 
21 - 40 of 71 Posts
Top