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2009 Sienna LE
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had the TMPS light come on in my 2009 so it was high time to replace all four. I thought that doing this by myself was out of the question and it was some dark arts reserved for the "pros" at my tire shops.
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Then, got a quote for $800.00 from a local shop............. after I stopped laughing I headed to Rock Auto to order four TPMS172K (Alloy Wheels) ACDELCO Sensors. Programmed.
When they arrived it was time to break a tire bead. The solution was to use the Sienna jack under my tow receiver hitch on my SUV to break only the bead around the sensor. I had to keep one foot on the free side of the rim to keep it from moving up as the weight of the SUV started down on the sidewall. Nothing major here.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Crankset Bicycle tire

Worked like a charm. The base of the jack is almost a duplicate of the ones on "real" bead breakers.
Next, I dropped a dog-toy tennis ball on each side of the bead to hold it away from the rim. Setting the tire on its side as shown keeps gravity from causing bad thing to happen (like the old sensor falling into the tire - $25.00 to remove it. :rolleyes: Ask me how I know.) Get the tire stem holder/ fishing line from your local auto store..... it's cheap insurance.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle

Keep track of the sensor number found on each one plus its location on the car and photograph it or make sure you carefully write down the number. Its the ID number.....
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior Fender

Carefully remove the old one. Keep the washer from the outer side. Install the new sensor, flip the washer over and tighten the stem to 8 N-m. Remove the tennis balls and refill with air to 35 PSI. The bead really wants to re-seat itself so getting it to re-inflate was no problem here. Valve stems were not removed. DO CHECK THEM, HOWEVER. I did not use ANY window cleaner, soap, etc.....around the rim or tires.
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Next, get the ATEQ OBD3-0000 Quickset Light TPMS Reset Toolfrom eBay for about $85.00. It works for the 2nd Generation alloy wheels. It did not seem to want to program for steel wheels for this year of car. Maybe they were not available with steel rims?
Gadget Communication Device Font Telephone Electronic device

Follow the included instructions and program the correct code of each sensor to the location shown in the software. I only have one set of tires so I programmed my four as my Summer set and unchecked the winter and spare settings boxes. After you press "Write to Quickset" it flashes the codes very quickly into the unit so don't think it did not work properly. Remove the unit from your computer and move out to your car. Move the key to the "RUN" position, connect the ATEQ. Make sure the green light is steady "ON". Press the "summer" icon/button on the device. Wait a moment for the green light to return from flashing to steady. Remove the ATEQ. The check tire light will go off in a block or two of driving if not sooner. If it does not go off, re-check your IDs. After this, ignore the sensors for another decade.
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Total cost? Sensors - $ 149.00. ATEQ Tool - $86.00. Valve stem fishing line - $5.50. Cost to retrieve dropped sensor from tire - $25.00 or $ 265.50. Savings? $550.00
 

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2006 LE
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2,178 Posts
You got skills !!! Nice job! For those of us who don't want to deal with it this way , if you are a Costco member , they will do this at a reasonable cost. Not sure about BJ's though , just sayin. $800 would be , in my book, too much.
 

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2009 Sienna LE
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Thank you for the excellent write-up. I recently did some research on this and it was hard to find details like yours. Your post will help others in the future. I opted to buy 4x Autel sensors and a used Autel TS508 programming tool, and since my tires are almost ready for new ones, I will ask the shop to replace my sensors when I buy new tires from them.
 

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2009 le awd
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441 Posts
Thats what I did too, the costs were pretty much just buying the sensors. I love the ingenuity of the o.p. though , well done. That's the kind of stuff I grew up watching my dad do. It of course taught me well.
The only reason I take my car in now is for tires only.
Thank you for the excellent write-up. I recently did some research on this and it was hard to find details like yours. Your post will help others in the future. I opted to buy 4x Autel sensors and a used Autel TS508 programming tool, and since my tires are almost ready for new ones, I will ask the shop to replace my sensors when I buy new tires from them.
 

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😂😂😂 $800 must be the stealership.

I bought my set for my gen 3, for 35 bucks oe eBay. Took it to discount tires to have my winter tires installed and they installed the tires and reprogram tpms for $140.

I have two sets of tires and rims with tpms now.

Good job though.
 

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2014 Sienna LE
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This post is simply amazing for those wanting to do this with a limited budget.

If money allows, a tool like the Quickset X would require no computer and no recording IDs. Simply scan the new sensors (from outside the tire) to put the IDs into the tool, then after scanning all four, plug it into the OBD connection to upload the TPMS IDs. For the record, I don't have the Quickset X, I bought the original Quickset before the X was released, followed later by the ATEQ V31 to activate and get ID codes from TPMS sensors. The Quickset X combines both of these tools into a single tool, which is much more useful overall.

😂😂😂 $800 must be the stealership.

I bought my set for my gen 3, for 35 bucks oe eBay. Took it to discount tires to have my winter tires installed and they installed the tires and reprogram tpms for $140.

I have two sets of tires and rims with tpms now.

Good job though.
I had a 4 wheel camper, and a truck at the time that had trailer TPMS. I took my camper to Discount Tire along with sensors I bought from Chevy ahead of time, and for a mere $15 per tire (in 2020) they removed, demounted, installed TPMS sensors, remounted, spun balance the tires and installed them back on the camper. All I had to do was park outside the shop and put the parking brake on, they jacked up the camper and took care of everything else. They'd certainly sell you the sensors too, but all I knew is that trailer TPMS systems were very new (Chevy added trailer TPMS in 2019), so they probably wouldn't know about it or which sensor(s) were compatible, so I just pre-bought the correct sensors. After the install I just used the truck's screen to bring up trailer TPMS registering, and the employee walked around the trailer and triggered each sensor in the order the truck specified, the truck beeping the horn automatically after each sensor was triggered to indicate it was registered. Took two minutes to register the TPMS sensors and was included in the cost of installing TPMS sensors.

For those who don't want to DIY TPMS sensors, I'd assume the cost would be the same for regular automotive wheels too, or $60 for all 4 wheels plus cost of sensors, and registering to your car would of course be included in the price. May have gone up slightly due to inflation, but Discount Tire probably cannot be beat in their cost for work like this short of a very motivated DIY person like the OP.
 

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2008 Sienna LE
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Discount Tire will replace a single TPMS sensor on these vans for $65, out the door. Ask me how I know 😅 That's $260 out the door for all 4, programmed and everything.

Look, I'm all about DIY; but tires are something I don't fuck with, without proper mounting equipment and something to contain the tire when seating the bead. Seen enough of them pop in my tire-slinging days, I'd rather not deal with that anymore.
 
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