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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't think of taking photos when I did this today, but did want to post here in case anyone was wondering like I did.

I purchased a kit from MIT accessories on eBay - https://www.ebay.com/itm/TOYOTA-SIENNA-2x-Dual-USB-port-phone-charger-2-1A-Power-Adapter-switch-2011-2017/142192754179?hash=item211b593e03:g:oMAAAOSwNRdX9lKV

The kit provides 2 2 port usb chargers, that are installing the lower panel behind the sliding doors. As far as random packages being shipped from china go, it's a pretty complete kit - includes the drill bit needed to cut the hole for usb sockets, and the connectors to tap into power. Installing on the drivers side is straightforward, but I wanted to post the easy way I found to run the power cable from the driver's side dash to the passenger door.

If you open the spidering cupholders, you can gently pop the panel holding the seat warmer controls and 12v socket free. This will let you reach into the center console and feed the power line from under the dash molding into the console. Then, opening the top glove box, remover the long faux-wood trim piece and you can run the line all the way over without difficulty. Obvious once you see it, but dude, it' was stressing me out how to get the line through without taking the dash apart.

It's handy having the power in the rear, it's controlled by a fused pushbutton switch that fills out the blank space my Sienna had, so that's always nice, and being able to independently power them on is great. If you want them to run while the car is off, you can wire it up that way, or have it connected to an accessory wire.
 

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If they're connected to an accessory wire anyway, why would you need to turn them off with the button? Is there some issue with USB ports sitting idle?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not really - I wired it this way so I could easily turn off the Christmas lights that are going to be plugged in there every December and as a threat to my kids if they act up - no power until morale improves!:)
 

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Thanks for posting. I've been eyeing this kit for awhile, but didn't want to be the first :). Did it come with instructions? What is the power source for the kit - an empty fuse spot or is it tied to some other accessory?
 

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At US $59.00 that kit's pretty expensive, but I guess you do get a switch that fits in the factory location, if that's what you're looking for.

I just got a $15 cigarette lighter/dual USB set from Amazon and wired it up using wire, 10 amp fuse, 30 amp relay, and etc. that I had in the garage. I have a 100 watt soldering iron I use on all permanent connections and used crimp on connections where necessary to spade terminals like on the relay. I connected my fuse straight to the battery, but have the power switched through a relay that I wired in to the existing cigarette lighter circuit. That way the power goes off when I turn the car off, but I'm also not overloading the existing cigarette lighter circuit.

YMMV depending on your experience. The kit above would be good for someone with less experience if it comes with instructions.
 

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At US $59.00 that kit's pretty expensive, but I guess you do get a switch that fits in the factory location, if that's what you're looking for.

I just got a $15 cigarette lighter/dual USB set from Amazon and wired it up using wire, 10 amp fuse, 30 amp relay, and etc. that I had in the garage. I have a 100 watt soldering iron I use on all permanent connections and used crimp on connections where necessary to spade terminals like on the relay. I connected my fuse straight to the battery, but have the power switched through a relay that I wired in to the existing cigarette lighter circuit. That way the power goes off when I turn the car off, but I'm also not overloading the existing cigarette lighter circuit.

YMMV depending on your experience. The kit above would be good for someone with less experience if it comes with instructions.
I haven't looked at the fuse box much, but why go through the trouble of tapping into existing wiring instead of just using an add a fuse from a switched fuse for the relay?
 

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I haven't looked at the fuse box much, but why go through the trouble of tapping into existing wiring instead of just using an add a fuse from a switched fuse for the relay?
Just a personal preference. I just don't like the "add a fuse" solution. I was already cutting holes in the center console, so didn't mind tapping into the existing wiring, which was "right there". If I remember right, that connection was cut, stripped, soldered, and covered in heat shrink tubing since I hate crimp on circuit taps even more than an "add a fuse".

Of course the downside to my solution is blowing the fuse for the socket in the dash will disable the socket and USB connections in the back of the center console.
 

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Just a personal preference. I just don't like the "add a fuse" solution.
I haven't looked at the Sienna's under-dash fuse box but I've never been able to use an add-a-circuit fuse tap in under-dash fuse boxes in other vehicles made by Toyota unless I was willing to leave the under-dash fuse box cover off which I am not willing to do. Because of that, I've always tapped into wires leading to a 12V port or cigarette lighter. I have, however, used fuse taps in engine compartment fuse boxes where there is far more room and they don't interfere with the fuse box cover.

Another way to tap an under-dash fuse that may not interfere with the fuse box cover is to use a simple metallic spade pushed into the "cold" side of the fuse receptacle so that the same fuse protects both the original circuit and the add-on device(s). I don't like this method due to the damage it can cause. I had a cell phone system installer use this method 30 years ago and I had to repair the fuse receptacle when I uninstalled the phone system.
 

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I haven't looked at the Sienna's under-dash fuse box but I've never been able to use an add-a-circuit fuse tap in under-dash fuse boxes in other vehicles made by Toyota unless I was willing to leave the under-dash fuse box cover off which I am not willing to do. Because of that, I've always tapped into wires leading to a 12V port or cigarette lighter. I have, however, used fuse taps in engine compartment fuse boxes where there is far more room and they don't interfere with the fuse box cover.

Another way to tap an under-dash fuse that may not interfere with the fuse box cover is to use a simple metallic spade pushed into the "cold" side of the fuse receptacle so that the same fuse protects both the original circuit and the add-on device(s). I don't like this method due to the damage it can cause. I had a cell phone system installer use this method 30 years ago and I had to repair the fuse receptacle when I uninstalled the phone system.
The cover does have to come off in the Sienna - which I learned 2 years ago when I installed under dash led strips. I just like the "simplicity" of the add-a-fuse.
 

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Just a personal preference. I just don't like the "add a fuse" solution. I was already cutting holes in the center console, so didn't mind tapping into the existing wiring, which was "right there". If I remember right, that connection was cut, stripped, soldered, and covered in heat shrink tubing since I hate crimp on circuit taps even more than an "add a fuse".

Of course the downside to my solution is blowing the fuse for the socket in the dash will disable the socket and USB connections in the back of the center console.
Gotcha. I already have the USB 12V socket from Amazon and am planning a similar project soon. I'm hoping to somehow install it higher up near the 3rd row or even inside the little arm rest compartment, but if not it'll be installed at the little lower access panel next to the 2nd row as you and the original poster have done.
 

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So was there a good way to add the outlets into their own fuse? I have a 2013 Sienna and would like to use the empty spots in my fuse box. I am unsure how to drop the fuse box down to find the wires coming out of the back.
IMG_20191002_105028.jpg
 

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So was there a good way to add the outlets into their own fuse? I have a 2013 Sienna and would like to use the empty spots in my fuse box. I am unsure how to drop the fuse box down to find the wires coming out of the back. View attachment 44722

I see you followed my link to this thread. Before you go any further and based on what your fuse box looks like, I'm wondering if the sliding door safety recall has been performed on your new-to-you Sienna. The recall work includes installing a new under-dash fuse box which has some altered fuse locations. I think you can check if the recall work has been done on your Sienna by entering your VIN at https://vinrcl.safercar.gov/vin/
 

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I looked up the recalls and only found one for the airbags. I added pictures of my actual fuse box in my initial post.
 
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