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Hello and thanks for any advice..i will be doing DIY replacement work on my 06 sienna with 190,000 miles. I have all the parts already...my question is what order do i do this work?...home mechanic.....have all the proper tools...including press and kwik lift etc

1. new oem rack and pinion with new tie rod ends
2. both sides control arms, new ball joints
3. both sides half shafts, axles...cordone brand
4. motor mounts
5. wheel bearings..
6. new back kyb shocks

any other suggestions would be appreicated
 

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I don't know about the motor mounts. :( But having done all the rest on my 2006 EXCEPT the wheel bearings, I can comment on the rest:

Put it up on some good jack stands, and make sure you locate them near the front so they are out of your way. Do yourself a favor and get some 6 ton jack stands. Yes, the 3 ton stands will take the weight safely, but the 6 ton stands will let you put it up higher, and that can make a big difference.

Pull the wheels and the windshield cowl so you can get to the top of the struts.

Pull the struts, half axles, and the control arms. The more room you make for the rack and pinion the better! You are probably going to have to cut the sway bar links off with a grinder, so plan on replacing them. Not expensive.

Then you can tackle the rack and pinion.

Assemble in reverse order.

Consider doing the full strut assembly, instead of just the shocks. That bearing at the top is probably shot, or close to it. (See my post on that.) It would be a shame to do all that work, and then have to go back again to do the strut because the bearing gave out.

I think the wheel bearings can probably go anywhere in the process. I'd probably plan to do them last. That way as you go, you can see if you need to tackle them sooner. I hope others can comment from experience.

By the way, here is a tip for dealing with the steering wheel shaft. Lining that up can be a bit of a pain, requiring some trial and error of taking it off, moving it one spline, and testing the alignment again. I "built" a tool to make it easier to get it off the splined fitting.

That whole thread might be useful to you.

(y)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't know about the motor mounts. :( But having done all the rest on my 2006 EXCEPT the wheel bearings, I can comment on the rest:

Put it up on some good jack stands, and make sure you locate them near the front so they are out of your way. Do yourself a favor and get some 6 ton jack stands. Yes, the 3 ton stands will take the weight safely, but the 6 ton stands will let you put it up higher, and that can make a big difference.

Pull the wheels and the windshield cowl so you can get to the top of the struts.

Pull the struts, half axles, and the control arms. The more room you make for the rack and pinion the better! You are probably going to have to cut the sway bar links off with a grinder, so plan on replacing them. Not expensive.

Then you can tackle the rack and pinion.

Assemble in reverse order.

Consider doing the full strut assembly, instead of just the shocks. That bearing at the top is probably shot, or close to it. (See my post on that.) It would be a shame to do all that work, and then have to go back again to do the strut because the bearing gave out.

I think the wheel bearings can probably go anywhere in the process. I'd probably plan to do them last. That way as you go, you can see if you need to tackle them sooner. I hope others can comment from experience.

By the way, here is a tip for dealing with the steering wheel shaft. Lining that up can be a bit of a pain, requiring some trial and error of taking it off, moving it one spline, and testing the alignment again. I "built" a tool to make it easier to get it off the splined fitting.

That whole thread might be useful to you.

(y)
Thanks Mark...really appreciate your input and thanks for the link....very helpful....i would like as much room as possible for the rack as you suggest, but wondering if anyone knows if there is any problem removing both axel/shafts at the same time, as i know on fords this can be a problem...i bought a kwik lift on craigslist a while back, and have already used it to help rebuild the suspension on and old alfa i have...really nice to have

if someone could give some input on when in the process the to tackle the motor mounts i would appreciate it...gonna use this old sienna to drive from California to Yellowstone
 

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Thanks for that KwikLift link! I'm going to have to look into that!

wondering if anyone knows if there is any problem removing both axel/shafts at the same time, as i know on fords this can be a problem
Dunno on that one. I did my one side at a time.

Enjoy Yellowstone! I just drove from east coast to west coast with my 2006, with 232k on the clock when we started. Nary a problem, and it climbed the Rockies (I-80) on cruise control at 70-80 mph, passing everybody. :)
 

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Thanks Mark....look for them on craigslist or offerup for best deal...has paid for itself already, plus i can park on it when in down position when not in use.....fyi i am doing the back shocks..not the front...bought some kyb on amazon market place for about 13 bucks each....i will also be doing the timing belt/water pump on the van before i go...did that once before about 90 thousand miles ago, and have all the correct tools...
 

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Generally speaking, I would typically do the hardest thing first. You basically have to do half this work just to get at the control arms, so I would probably start there. That said, if you're going to do a timing belt soon, you should throw an ASIN timing belt kit plus a seal kit into the mix too, plus the serpentine belt and accessory belt, since they have to come off anyway. Although, if you only did the timing belt at 90k, you're probably a bit early for that. You should have no problems getting 100-120k out of a timing belt without much risk. My '06 with fewer miles needed a passenger half-shaft. The carrier bearing was fused into the carrier bracket, thanks to more than a decade of New England winter/roads, and the ONLY way it could be removed was destructively cutting apart the bracket. Oh and since you're doing everything else, it would be a shame to leave the sway bar bushings untouched. If you haven't done it in a while, I would drain and fill the trans fluid and, if it were me, I would probably give it a fresh oil change just so the oil change light doesn't turn on part way through the trip. If it's a DIY job, you're probably looking at 15-20 hours of work to do all this though.
 

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Sorry if it was mentioned before , but , don't overlook the axle seals . Ask me how I know!! Since you are doing the drive shafts it is cheap insurance to change those seals.
 

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I think you should do the front struts unless they have been replaced before. It will ride like a new car with all those new parts.
 

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Sorry if it was mentioned before , but , don't overlook the axle seals . Ask me how I know!! Since you are doing the drive shafts it is cheap insurance to change those seals.
thanks..i would have forgot those...will source some out
 

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Generally speaking, I would typically do the hardest thing first. You basically have to do half this work just to get at the control arms, so I would probably start there. That said, if you're going to do a timing belt soon, you should throw an ASIN timing belt kit plus a seal kit into the mix too, plus the serpentine belt and accessory belt, since they have to come off anyway. Although, if you only did the timing belt at 90k, you're probably a bit early for that. You should have no problems getting 100-120k out of a timing belt without much risk. My '06 with fewer miles needed a passenger half-shaft. The carrier bearing was fused into the carrier bracket, thanks to more than a decade of New England winter/roads, and the ONLY way it could be removed was destructively cutting apart the bracket. Oh and since you're doing everything else, it would be a shame to leave the sway bar bushings untouched. If you haven't done it in a while, I would drain and fill the trans fluid and, if it were me, I would probably give it a fresh oil change just so the oil change light doesn't turn on part way through the trip. If it's a DIY job, you're probably looking at 15-20 hours of work to do all this though.
Thanks Bill...am not going to yellowstone until july of next year, and retiring 12/31 so i have enough time to do the work hopefully here in southern cal, the shaft is not fused..no salt here....I know you are correct about the belt, and may not do it...but having done it before i may do it a month or so before the trip....but for now looks like i have enough work for while....please keep the suggestions coming...i appreciate it.......have you guys seen this video of a 06 sienna with over 500,000 miles on it!

 
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