Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i read somewhere that our "All electric AC compressor" is not as powerful as the pulley driven counterparts. To me that means "less cooling". Since I have a dark blue Sienna i felt i needed to improve AC efficiency. So added insulation on the AC cooling pipes to prevent heat soak during traffic or very hot conditions.

Before insulation
Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive design Computer hardware


After insulation
Vehicle Hood Car Automotive tire Motor vehicle

Motor vehicle Car Product Automotive design Automotive air manifold


I bought the insulation from Lowes for $5. Remember every degree of heat absorbed in these aluminum pipes translate to the same amount of heat added inside the cabin. Heat loss = heat gain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input/s - thats why I like these forums. Yes i used the same insulation material for at least 10 years on all my vehicles with great success. Especially in the WRX / STi where the Turbo sits inches from the AC cooling lines (so far no fires) - I will have to check what is the fire rating of this insulating material from home depot / Lowes. Too bad I do not have my 2007 Mercedes Benz with me right now because my son drove it to North Carolina for his internship (cant take pics). I have insulated that too with great success.

Thank you for the link - Jetstreamblue. There are really a lot of opposing opinions even if you read through that 1 link you gave. So use your own judgement and use/do at your own peril (Disclaimer). One thing i can say is - Toyota Engineers designed this whole system to work in all sorts of weathers/climates. Customers from frigid Alaska to hot Arizona have the same Toyota Sienna A/C systems (no variations that I know of). So worrying about additional insulation and getting too cold that it might freeze the lines is a concern if you live in Alaska (but im sure Toyota has considered that eventuality too). I do not see any downside for customers in say Arizona, Texas, Florida other than melting the insulation because it is too hot. So far ambient temps here is at most 105 Fahrenheit.

The whole AC system (a/c lines, compressor, evaporator) works to move heat from the passenger compartment into the front mounted condenser. The lines i insulated is the lower pressure pipe that carries refrigerant from the inside compartment (evaporator) in gas form. Moving from higher pressure (liquid) to lower pressure (gas) creates that cooling effect. So why insulate that ? so that it does not get too hot - making the refrigerant easier to compress into liquid again.

Also, modern AC compressors are thermally protected against freezing (otherwise we cannot use these for defogging our windshields during winter).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know some GMs had issues with corrosion in their A/C lines. You might want to check later under the insulation to make sure it's looking good and not holding moisture in.
Duly noted. I noticed these are all aluminum lines so it is less susceptible to corrosion. But i will still check every now and then. I already sold my 2004 wrx - never had ac issues with that. Too bad i couldnt check for corrosion.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top