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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put in my new airlift bags last night, it was an easy install. I ran the hose from the right side straight across and joined the left side with a T and then ran straight back. I have the fill valve attached to the top of the hitch for now with a zip tie, I expect I'll mount it with a hole through the lower bumper plastic over the hitch. I am running about 20lbs and they really help cushion the shocks of our hacked up roads. I expect to run them right up to 35 when towing.

The only problem I had was getting the hoses to slide all the way on the barbed connectors, if I have leaks I'll use some soap water.
 

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I installed ours about a year ago. I keep them at 10-15psi most of the time and it keeps the rear end from squatting. They were especially nice on a two week trip to the west coast/Vancouver island. We had that van racked full of stuff and a couple of bikes on the back hitch rack. Now that we bought a travel trailer a couple of months ago, they will help towing that around. Even with the weight distributing hitch, they are a nice addition to the van when towing.

I ran the hose to the back and installed the valve through the lower black plastic trim. Easy to check and fill that way. I've never had a problem with leaking but I did warm the hoses a bit before putting them onto the fittings and a bit of silicone spray helps lube everything along.

jroden said:
I put in my new airlift bags last night, it was an easy install. I ran the hose from the right side straight across and joined the left side with a T and then ran straight back. I have the fill valve attached to the top of the hitch for now with a zip tie, I expect I'll mount it with a hole through the lower bumper plastic over the hitch. I am running about 20lbs and they really help cushion the shocks of our hacked up roads. I expect to run them right up to 35 when towing.

The only problem I had was getting the hoses to slide all the way on the barbed connectors, if I have leaks I'll use some soap water.
 

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I ran mine to the gas tank fill door. I just didn't have the nerve to drill thru the bumper cover, but also didn't want to have to crawl underneath to adjust pressure. Mine is an '01 and it JUST fit so the door would close properly. I think I have a pic. . .


Edit:
Hard to tell what is it in this one



Here is without the cap on it


 

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I like the gas door hook-up. sweet!!! YUP drilling into the bumper? I can't do it!! I just put a new one on(bumper) It cost me over $500.00. I am not a big "nitrogen" fan but i may just run nitrogen just for this.(maybe?) I will see how all the lines sit and go from there. "WE" have some cold winters and im thinking moisture may cause a problem? IDK.
 

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I doubt the nitrogen is necessary. Been through a Calgary winter with them and they held up great. Checked the pressure at -25C and it was the same as where I left it. Unless you have nitrogen available every time you change the pressure with the load, it'll be getting air anyway. regular air is 78% nitrogen anyway.

Notice how nice and clean my van is!!

robo5 said:
I like the gas door hook-up. sweet!!! YUP drilling into the bumper? I can't do it!! I just put a new one on(bumper) It cost me over $500.00. I am not a big "nitrogen" fan but i may just run nitrogen just for this.(maybe?) I will see how all the lines sit and go from there. "WE" have some cold winters and im thinking moisture may cause a problem? IDK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I finally got around to finding the little leak I had. I filled up to 35psi and sprayed some windex on everything, sure enough the one side of the t-fitting I did not bother to put the metal clamp on was leaking. I used some silicone of the fitting to help get the hose on. By far the biggest time waster of this install is those crummy metal clamps, if I were to do it over I'd buy a different design that goes on quicker
 

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My Coil-Rite kit used all push-on connectors: no barbed fittings, no clamps. I did have some trouble with leakage at fittings, since these push-on connectors are sealed by O-rings and are very sensitive to having a cleanly cut end and fully inserted tube.

If someone who has installed the Air Lift kit has readily available photos of the fittings used in that kit, I would interested in seeing them... but it's not a big deal for me as my bags and plumbing are installed.
 

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brian_bp said:
If someone who has installed the Air Lift kit has readily available photos of the fittings used in that kit, I would interested in seeing them... but it's not a big deal for me as my bags and plumbing are installed.
I don't have pics of the fittings right now but they look just like the vacuum line fittings you see at any auto parts store. The lines are a hard-ish plastic and "slide" right onto the fittings. I was a little disappointed in the quality of the fittings but there are no leaks. If one was really concerned about it you could probably use the brass compression couplers that you can find and Home Depot. I wasn't that concerned though.
 

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Rust Heap said:
...I don't have pics of the fittings right now but they look just like the vacuum line fittings you see at any auto parts store. The lines are a hard-ish plastic and "slide" right onto the fittings.
Thanks, that description is clear.

Rust Heap said:
...If one was really concerned about it you could probably use the brass compression couplers that you can find and Home Depot.
I agree, and I would have used those fitting except that the push-on fittings in the Coil-Rite kit are built right into the bags and the valves.
 

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I just bought these from Amazon.com for $68 shipped. Most other places were selling them for $80+ and did not include shipping. Anyway, I just bought and installed the Hidden Hitch from ETrailer.com, as well as the wiring harness. The hitch installed fairly easily, but when backing out of the driveway....SCRAPE! I can avoid the scrape by backing out at an angle, but that's with an empty van -- I'll probably always get the scrape when loaded with gear or people. So, I decided it was time to go all the way and get the air lift bags as well. I'm hoping they are as easy to install as the hitch and wiring harness was!

Thanks for the suggestion to run the air line over to the left and then back. I'm probably going to attach the valve end to the hitch where there's a little "platform" for the trailer harness with just the right amount of room for the valve line next to the harness plug. I do like the idea of the fuel door install, but how the heck did you reach all the way up there? ;)
 

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It was easy to get to when I removed the interior panel on that side. I had it off previously when I was running the wiring for my 7pin and repairing a rear hatch water leak. The hardest part for me is drilling the holes. It is hard to fix a hole drilled in the wrong spot so I quintouple check when it is time to drill.
 

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...and make sure the wife isn't at home... :eek: :mad: ??? ;) ;D ::) ;D ;D
 

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Going to be doing this soon as well.. I bought the kit from Amazon. Not easy finding the right floor jack around here tho'. They want to much for shipping, if I buy online. Maybe I want too much out of a floor jack! Any ideas/recommendations on a 2-3 ton hydraulic jack that will get under my AWD and yet still lift it high enough? Really hoping not to spend 200.00 bucks, nor have it be LARGE...
 

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jake696 said:
...Any ideas/recommendations on a 2-3 ton hydraulic jack that will get under my AWD and yet still lift it high enough? Really hoping not to spend 200.00 bucks, nor have it be LARGE...
I like floor jacks to be large, so they have a long arm and lift more vertically. I have a couple, both in that capacity range, and both fit under the 2WD front and rear central jack points with room to spare... is the rear diff that much lower?

Some of the aluminum (or partially aluminum) designs are quite low; however, they are also expensive. This is the type of item I buy at Costco or discount auto/tool stores.
 

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I finally got my "airlift 1000". Installed it yesterday. Nice and easy. Took me about an hour to install.

I ran the inlet up on the passenger side by the exhaust and into the cabin via the drainplug in the right rear(by the jack and rear A/C) I just leave the inlet inside the "jack" compartment so i did not drill into anything(it's hidden away)

"WHY" did i run it by the exhaust? It was easyer to access the cabin that way. It is far enough away from the exhaust pipe at the back. Clearance between the pipe and hose is 3 inches. I don't see any problems arising. Did not have my camera handy at the time but i will try to take a pic just to give you an idea.
 

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Thanks to the old forum and now finding this one, I decided to tackle the Airlift 1000 installation last night...

I purchased the Airlift 1000 Model 60732 from Amazon.com and it was $68 shipped.

I took the suggestion for installing the fill valve inside the gas filler door on our '07. Although it was a bit more time consuming to do it this way, the end result turned out very good. After removing the wheel well liner, I was able to access where I had to drill a hole in the wheel well and run the airline following the gas filler lines. You have to drill a hole inside the filler door AND inside the rear wheel well to run the air line.

I took the suggestions to install the airbags with the barbed fitting up as it gave a much cleaner install for routing the air lines.

I was a little bit surprised with the total lift of the back end at the hitch. With the airbags at their recommended max of 35 psi, the total lift was just under an inch unloaded. (I'm running the Curt 13256 which I installed pretty easily. For me, the trick was to get each bolt just started and then start tightening them up after they were all threaded in.) Before I installed the airbags, the bottom of the hitch was at 8.5", now it is almost to 9.5" with the airbags fully inflated. What is the ground clearance for anyone else?
 

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I would suggest caution evaluating the air bag installation by the amount that the van is lifted when not loaded. The idea of the air bags is to maintain original ride height (or reduce the drop) as load is added. When the Sienna is empty, the air bags should be at minimal pressure (5 psi is usually suggested). As rear passenger, cargo, and/or trailer load is added the bags should be pumped up enough to reduce or eliminate the drop from the unloaded condition.

The bags are of limited length, and if you attempt to push the van up with more bag pressure, you can only get so far before the bags are at their full extension. If the van is lifted (such as for service), the suspension moves enough that the bags can't even fill the length of the springs, and the bags' ends not longer bear on the mounts. This is okay, but only at minimal pressure; if this is done at 35 psi, I would be concerned about rupturing the ends of the bags.

I find that with cargo and trailer load pushing the total axle load right to the Gross Axle Weight Rating, a reasonable amount of air in the bags can keep the suspension (and thus hitch) height nearly up to the stock height.

In other words, if the clearance to the bottom of the hitch is 8.5" without the bags and unloaded, then I would be happy to maintain that; the benefit comes from keeping 8.5" of clearance even under load, by adding air.
 
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