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Hey everyone. I am frustrated with my wifes 2014 Sienna AWD that has run flats. It's a great ride except for the run flats. We currently have the Bridgestones run flats and they are awful tires. This is our third set and they wear so fast. I am really thinking about what I can do to ditch the run flats and go with regular tires. I know some of you have done away with run flats and I would like to know what conventional tires you went with and would a skinny spare that has the same diameter work? Also for the spare did you put a pressure sensor in it as well? Please tell me your setup. Thanks for all your help.
 

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Welcome. I ditched the runflats on my 13 Limited AWD and am glad I did. I am going to suggest you read through the Gen 3 General Discussion sticky on this subject as that will provide many options for you. It’s the second topic listed.
 

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Went with Conti TrueContact touring tires on my 2018 AWD. Great all-around tires. Haven’t tried them in the snow since I have a set of dedicated snow tires. Don’t use or have a skinny spare. Have AAA, a can of fix-a-flat, and a compressor for any potential flats.

If you do go with a spare, no need for a TPMS sensor as you would have to reprogram the OBD system to recognize the sensor anyway. That’s more hassle than you need to just get to a shop to repair the flat tire. Just deal with the TPMS error light in the short meantime.


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The sticky has everything you ever wanted to know about getting a spare for your Sienna. But basically, yes you can get non-RFTs for your Sienna and if you want to carry around a spare tire/wheel, there are a few options that people have tried that are discussed in the stick thread. It boils down to:

1. Donut spare (from the FWD Sienna or another brand/model). Have to get a tire with as close to the rolling diameter of the AWD tires or you could get damage to the AWD system.
2. Full size spare.
3. Vredestein (collapsable spare). Typically you source this from a luxury car that uses it and so this tends to be the most expensive option. Also requires a custom fabricated adapter that costs over $100, but this is the most compact solution that will almost lie flat in the space behind the 3rd row, but does lie flat on top of the cargo organizer that fits in that space.
4. No spare, use an inflator (I can't remember the actual name) or tire patch kit but have to be careful as some can prevent tire repair.
 

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Because most temporary spares also require high pressure to carry the load (60 psi), a TPMS sensor is not practical or recommended. You'll just have to put up with the dash light until you replace/restore the flat tire.
 

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Wow. You people are great! Thanks for all the advice. I just saw the sticky so I jumped the gun a little before looking around the site. I have a lot to read about the 3rd gen Sienna.
 

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Hey everyone. I am frustrated with my wifes 2014 Sienna AWD that has run flats. It's a great ride except for the run flats. We currently have the Bridgestones run flats and they are awful tires. This is our third set and they wear so fast. I am really thinking about what I can do to ditch the run flats and go with regular tires. I know some of you have done away with run flats and I would like to know what conventional tires you went with and would a skinny spare that has the same diameter work? Also for the spare did you put a pressure sensor in it as well? Please tell me your setup. Thanks for all your help.
2012 Sienna here, on our fourth set of tires. But, my friends, I believe this set is going to last for more than 15k miles. Bridgestone DriveGuard run flats, with a 60k mile warranty that they'll honor, and they are repairable (Firestone pulled a nail out and patched one last week for us).

They drive better than our prior sets, too. It's still a run-flat, but it's miles better (get it) that what we had. This set of tires, plus the lifetime alignment at Firestone, is turning out to be a pretty decent bet. No idea why Toyota can't do better on the OEM tires, or why the alignment on a Sienna comes and goes with phases of the moon. Or why the rear trunk leaks. But at least I think I have our tire situation handled.
 

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Hey everyone. I am frustrated with my wifes 2014 Sienna AWD that has run flats. It's a great ride except for the run flats. We currently have the Bridgestones run flats and they are awful tires. This is our third set and they wear so fast. I am really thinking about what I can do to ditch the run flats and go with regular tires. I know some of you have done away with run flats and I would like to know what conventional tires you went with and would a skinny spare that has the same diameter work? Also for the spare did you put a pressure sensor in it as well? Please tell me your setup. Thanks for all your help.
I have used the Bridgestone run flats on my 2007 Sienna for years. Granted they do not get the mileage that regular tires get but I have averaged between 30-40K miles between sets and they ride smoothly. My latest tires are new Drive Guard tires by Bridgestone warranty for 60K miles. Since it is your wife's car I would rather have the piece of mind as to her not having to change a tire in case of loss of pressure. I have had a run flat tire with only 10 lbs of pressure in it with no noticeable degradation of driving (obviously at 50-55 MPH).
 

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I would just stick with conventional tires (Goodyear, BF Goodridge, etc). Go to Tirerack.com and read the ratings on the tires that you might consider in getting.
 

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2014 AWD sienna here. I just purchased tires last week and ran with Michelin Premier tires, non run-flat. Couldn’t handle the run-flat characteristics. I carry two cans of fixaflat and my AAA card.


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I got rid of my run flat tires at about 15k miles. I could have stretched them to 20k, but they were so terrible I ditched them. I went with Continental pure contact based on reviews and availability - they are great. Only downside for me is that they are directional, making rotation of a 5th tire (full size spare) difficult.

One option that I didn’t see mentioned for carrying a spare is a hitch mounted spare tire carrier. There are pros and cons, for sure, but it might make sense depending on your situation. I think a roof mounted spare tire carrier is another option worth considering...
 

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One option that I didn’t see mentioned for carrying a spare is a hitch mounted spare tire carrier. There are pros and cons, for sure, but it might make sense depending on your situation. I think a roof mounted spare tire carrier is another option worth considering...
That's a good point and something for people to consider as well. There is a link to one of the smaller companies making nice spare wheel hitch mounts (like an old school Pathfinder) in that sticky thread.

I also considered the safari look with a roof rack with a spare wheel mounted on it (Yakima I think used to have an spare tire mount attachment for one of their roof racks) and for the first time saw one in my neighborhood in Seattle -- a 3rd gen Sienna with a large roof rack with what appeared to be a full size spare mounted on it and I have to say it looked fairly ridiculous. Maybe an option when you're driving in the outback in Australia or Alaska but I would not want to drive around town with that thing on top.
 

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Yeah, I can understand not wanting the tire on the roof...it would be hard to safely take it down, for one. But when I see a sienna driving around with a roof tire, I don’t see something ridiculous, I see a kindered spirit. :)

I sure hope the next gen sienna has an AWD option that can somehow incorporate a full sized spare.
 

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Wow. You people are great! Thanks for all the advice. I just saw the sticky so I jumped the gun a little before looking around the site. I have a lot to read about the 3rd gen Sienna.
 

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Same here with our 2011. I love the run-flat idea but that's a lot of $$$. So ours went to "normal" tires and I keep an inflator and a plug kit in there. There's probably a can of fix-a-flat in there as well, but not sure. That stuff is kinda on the "well, I don't really want to use this stuff. but right now it might be the easiest option."
 

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I didn't take the time to watch that whole video, but based on my personal experiences:
-I believe most of the products are theoretically not flammable these days. Older stuff was.
-It makes a mess inside the tire. Definitely a good chance you'll need to replace the TPMS sensor.
-Sidewall problems are quite unlikely to hold (or be safe no matter what you use)
-As far as "a nail in the tread" problem... The sealants "may" work, or "may work (very)temporarily".

Like I said, I'd rather not use them, but sometimes it's the option I might choose. Last time was in my old Ford C-Max which comes with an inflator with a can of sealant. Which I then found out was used by the previous owner and not replaced. I was about 60 miles from home. Used the inflator(just air) the first time, but that didn't look like it was going to make it very far. Really didn't feel like laying in the parking lot and trying to plug the tire on the car(the car doesn't come with a jack or lugnut wrench either, though I had put some in there for possible emergency situations but less than ideal). These were also winter wheels without TPMS, so I got a cheap can of Fix-a-flat and it at least made it another 45 minutes to home where I plugged the tire.

But I've also had times on vehicles where I tried the inflator, flat in 5 minutes, then put in the fix-a-flat, still flat in 5 minutes and then had to pull out a spare in some form(like possibly having someone bring me another wheel/tire that was in the garage) anyway.

for those who have "Fix-a-Flat":
 

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Yeah, I would never use it to "fix" anything. It's like a cheap band-aid that might fall off. If you get a nail in your tire away from home, you leave the nail in, use the can of fix a flat and you "may" make it home to plug it properly. Or it might not.
You have to weigh your options at the time. Best bet is to just plug the tire, but if I'm away from home, I'm usually not dressed in clothes I want to be messing around on the ground in dirt/parking lot/etc. I could, but I'll probably try the $5 can first to see if it will band-aid long enough...

The video shows that Fix-a-flat is too runny and doesn't fix anything.
 

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OK, I found the minute of Fix-a-flat. Interesting, looks like in his video he screws in a screw then rips it out. Yeah, I wouldn't expect that to work. I didn't see it on his can, but they used to have a note to make sure NOT to pull out whatever caused the leak. But I can't think of a much worse damage than somehow getting a screw into your tire and then having it yanked back out... Where are you driving that has screw threads facing upright that are fastened to the ground?
 
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