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Hopefully, somebody can help me with an easy fix. I've had this issue with this van for a while and every time it happens, after the initial shock, I think about driving this van off a cliff....For some reason, usually, unexpectedly, this van will apply the breaks when not needed...theres a few spots in town where I know this is going to happen and brace for it but sometimes its a surprise..the first time it happend was on a bridge/onramp that has a turn in it and the van came off the ground almost on two wheels...it also makes it so I cannot accelerate...recently took a trip to yosemite with the family...the van was doing this with chains on the tires in the snow....this is very very dangerous..for it to break in the snow on a turn can easily cause us to spin out...when this first happened I emailed toyota and they had me take it to a dealership where they looked at it and couldnt find the problem....one "fix" I have had (kinda) has been accidental...ive had oxygen sensors that have went out in my van which for what ever reason, disables the automatic breaking feature...ive actually waited a whole year to fix the sensors until the very last minute when I had to smog the van just because it is nice having this feature disabled.

so to make a long story short, has anybody else experienced this breaking and acceleration problem and does anybody know how to disable it?..... I haven't found anything online.. I wanna go purposely break my sensors but that fix is super expensive..I'm hoping a fuse or something could solve this...any ideas?
2005 toyota sienna xle
 

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First off, the things that stop you are called "brakes". "Breaking" (as in your van might be broken) is also likely true. But I digress. I fixed the title.... I'm too lazy to chase down all the rest.

What you are likely experiencing is the stability control falsely believing that the van is not following the steering arc (understeer typically), and selectively activating one or more wheel brakes to try and correct what it thinks is a skid. This happens when the yaw sensor and the steering angle sensor are not in agreement on the path the van is taking.

Normal wear in steering components or a recent wheel alignment can set up this problem. The performing of a Zero Point Calibration can often fix it. Any shop that does alignments can help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First off, the things that stop you are called "brakes". "Breaking" (as in your van might be broken) is also likely true. But I digress. I fixed the title.... I'm too lazy to chase down all the rest.

What you are likely experiencing is the stability control falsely believing that the van is not following the steering arc (understeer typically), and selectively activating one or more wheel brakes to try and correct what it thinks is a skid. This happens when the yaw sensor and the steering angle sensor are not in agreement on the path the van is taking.

Normal wear in steering components or a recent wheel alignment can set up this problem. The performing of a Zero Point Calibration can often fix it. Any shop that does alignments can help you.
Haha..thanks for fixing that..and thanks for the response. I will look into that...funny how the Toyota technicians couldn’t give me that answer
 

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the van downshifts, you lift your foot and it's free brake-material free... it's an automated boomer technique to save your brakes from boiling or loosing it's braking material. Econolines use to brake overheat all the time, especially at Northern Yellowstone. You can see the signs around the Oregon California border tell big rigs to downshift. Mill Creek, WA has a big hill coming from the Freeway, also from Seattl HIll Rd to Snohomish Valley. I use it all the time.

Engine Braking also doesn't consume gas.

 

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the van downshifts, you lift your foot and it's free brake-material free... it's an automated boomer technique to save your brakes from boiling or loosing it's braking material. Econolines use to brake overheat all the time, especially at Northern Yellowstone. You can see the signs around the Oregon California border tell big rigs to downshift. Mill Creek, WA has a big hill coming from the Freeway, also from Seattl HIll Rd to Snohomish Valley. I use it all the time.

Engine Braking also doesn't consume gas.

I think you posted this in the wrong thread
 
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