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Hello:

I was using the entry key (my car battery was dead) and as I turned it, the plastic housing crumbled. This is a 2012 so I'm sure age was a factor.

Now I just have the actual key without no housing, which requires a pair of pliers to operate. Is there a way to get a replacement key cut without going to the dealer?

Thank you,
 

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Sure is. Go to your local locksmith. Might pay more for a blank from them but you will need them to cut it too so saves you some hassle. No reason they shouldnt have them but if they dont, just search on line for Sienna blank emergency key.
 

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I maybe should have read his question more closely. I assumed he meant one of those small keys thats inside your fob on cars that have push to start. Now that I think about it I'm not sure 2012's even had PTS.
If its the standard black key he's talking about thats a chipped key but my answer would stay the same. I would go to a locksmith. They usually carry chipped keys and can cut and program them.
Home Depot or the like might carry automotive keys but not sure they can program chipped ones.
 

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In my experience, Home Depot can do some chipped keys, but not all. I think we're all a little unclear on just what key he needs. If he just wants a basic key only to open the door lock, then a $3 metal key from the hardware store is fine. If he needs a chipped key to start the van, then I agree, a locksmith is probably best. I had to get a chipped key for my 18 Sienna, and it was over $100 even after shopping around.
 

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I maybe should have read his question more closely. I assumed he meant one of those small keys thats inside your fob on cars that have push to start. Now that I think about it I'm not sure 2012's even had PTS.
If its the standard black key he's talking about thats a chipped key but my answer would stay the same. I would go to a locksmith. They usually carry chipped keys and can cut and program them.
Home Depot or the like might carry automotive keys but not sure they can program chipped ones.
just a small "general knowledge post"
since Siennas MY11 to MY20 some trims came with PTS (a very cool feature to have in 2011) and the ones that did not have PTS had a traditional key (was to be expected)
Age difference started to show when MY18/19/20 some trims came with PTS and other trims came with a traditional key and a remote fob... not a KEYFOB like in the RAV4, but a 1990's style key with a remote control.
Thank God all siennas come with PTS starting 2021 no matter the trim
 

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My mom had a 2012 Sienna. I got her a new fob for $26 and new chipped key for $30. Programmed both for free with my buddies knock off tech stream and paid $5 bucks to have the key cut at a local locksmith place. And yes, it was a 4 button remote for the dual power sliding rear doors.
Those are Canadian prices, should be cheaper south of the border.
 

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My mom had a 2012 Sienna. I got her a new fob for $26 and new chipped key for $30. Programmed both for free with my buddies knock off tech stream and paid $5 bucks to have the key cut at a local locksmith place. And yes, it was a 4 button remote for the dual power sliding rear doors.
Those are Canadian prices, should be cheaper south of the border.
My chipped key was like $35 and $6 cutting fee at a Toyota dealer. Can’t remember fob price but I think it was like $80 or more. Now programming, well they charge like $135 just to program the key. I’d have bought the knockoff tool to program it myself, except the key, fob, and all programming was paid for by Carmax because the van only had one set when I bought it and they say you get two sets.
 

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If you don’t mind losing the security of the chip and don’t want to pay a cloning fee to someone you can pull the shroud to get to the receiver ring in the column and tape or hot glue the remnants of the broken key within range of the receiver and just use regular keys. Buy all you want for $4 ~ $5 at a good locksmith. When you have the programmed chip within range and you use a regular key the car will be reading the old chip key in the shroud.

Transponder keys are usually programmed 3 ways depending on the make and year

1 - unlock the computer with software to allow the car to recognize the new keys.

2 - clone the new keys so they put out the same signal as an existing programmed key. The car doesn’t know better

3 - on board programming. Some vehicles allow you to add additional keys by doing some tasks to program additional keys. Usually you have to have 2 working keys or know some crazy routine. Turn key on 3 times, push brake pedal 4 times, open door twice or something similar.

Be aware on our Toyotas that the lock cylinders use full spacing mixed with half spacing (not depths, just spacing) so a good key is more important than most. When you get a key made at “joe blows” they are just duplicating your key. Your not getting a “new” key just a tracing of your old worn out key.
I code cut every key I make. There are only 4 depths so it’s easy to read the key with your eye once you understand.

I’ve been a full time locksmith since 1983 (39 years). I’ve been involved in transponder technology since the beginning with PATS on fords to VATS in gm’s.
 

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If you don’t mind losing the security of the chip and don’t want to pay a cloning fee to someone you can pull the shroud to get to the receiver ring in the column and tape or hot glue the remnants of the broken key within range of the receiver and just use regular keys. Buy all you want for $4 ~ $5 at a good locksmith. When you have the programmed chip within range and you use a regular key the car will be reading the old chip key in the shroud.

Transponder keys are usually programmed 3 ways depending on the make and year

1 - unlock the computer with software to allow the car to recognize the new keys.

2 - clone the new keys so they put out the same signal as an existing programmed key. The car doesn’t know better

3 - on board programming. Some vehicles allow you to add additional keys by doing some tasks to program additional keys. Usually you have to have 2 working keys or know some crazy routine. Turn key on 3 times, push brake pedal 4 times, open door twice or something similar.

Be aware on our Toyotas that the lock cylinders use full spacing mixed with half spacing (not depths, just spacing) so a good key is more important than most. When you get a key made at “joe blows” they are just duplicating your key. Your not getting a “new” key just a tracing of your old worn out key.
I code cut every key I make. There are only 4 depths so it’s easy to read the key with your eye once you understand.

I’ve been a full time locksmith since 1983 (39 years). I’ve been involved in transponder technology since the beginning with PATS on fords to VATS in gm’s.
I'm not a locksmith but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express.....

As to your points 2 and 3. It is my understanding that you can not self program a working 3rd key if you only have an original and a clone to start with. As you mentioned the vehicle can't tell the difference between the original and the clone so it thinks you only have one key even though you physically have two.
 

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I'm not a locksmith but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express.....

As to your points 2 and 3. It is my understanding that you can not self program a working 3rd key if you only have an original and a clone to start with. As you mentioned the vehicle can't tell the difference between the original and the clone so it thinks you only have one key even though you physically have two.
Ours has no self programming on later years. But you can self program 98 ~ 2002 (if you have one working key that’s not a valet) Heres some good info. Ilco makes the keys for most all applications (even factory keys). Of course it depends on the years of each version.

Handwriting Font Parallel Monochrome Monochrome photography

Rectangle Font Wood Gas Parallel

Font Material property Output device Technology Electronic device


And an example of the spaces and depths with our keys.

Font Rectangle Gas Technology Electronic device


If you look at the cuts 31234322 (ignore what looks like the last cut, that’s part of the blank and how the valet key works, you cut that to a three to make a valet key) and the picture of the keys and remember there are only 4 depths you can see that after you understand how it works it’s pretty easy to “read” the cuts with your eyes.
A one is no cut and four is all the way to the groove so it makes two and three easy to figure.

Another thing cool about that software is if you either look at the key or put a micrometer to it and figure out the cuts, you can go to “find bitting” page and type in the cuts and it will give you the original key code.
 

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I'm not a locksmith but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express.....

As to your points 2 and 3. It is my understanding that you can not self program a working 3rd key if you only have an original and a clone to start with. As you mentioned the vehicle can't tell the difference between the original and the clone so it thinks you only have one key even though you physically have two.
Depends entirely on the manufacturer. Fords you have to have 2 working non cloned keys. On GM’s they originally had 15 different blanks with different resistors built in. On Toyotas that allow self programming, you only have to have 1 working non valet key.

Most people think the purpose of a valet key is to keep a shop (or whoever) out of the trunk or glove box and still enter and start the car, that’s partially true. On transponder keys you can program a key (above screen shot) that you can’t program off of. The purpose was if you take your car to a shop and give them a valet key they couldn’t sneak and copy the key/self program and come snatch the car later. That’s also the reason Ford requires 2 working keys to program more (up to 8)

Manufacturers have gone freaking nuts now so you can’t work on anything yourself (or make the equipment so expensive to non factory techs nobody can afford it)

That’s how they skirt the laws about they must allow people to work on their own stuff. They make the equipment so expensive. “What, it’s available just buy the machine”.
 

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Interesting. I never knew about not being allowed to clone a valet key, make sense, and I just learned something.
As a certified lock smith you might not be able to buy cheap knock off software and use it on customers cars, but the average joe can do it. Thats how I did my moms 2012 key and fob. 5 minutes in my buddies driveway.
I also learned that day that Sienna's can hold up to 5 keys in the memory.
 

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Interesting. I never knew about not being allowed to clone a valet key, make sense, and I just learned something.
As a certified lock smith you might not be able to buy cheap knock off software and use it on customers cars, but the average joe can do it. Thats how I did my moms 2012 key and fob. 5 minutes in my buddies driveway.
I also learned that day that Sienna's can hold up to 5 keys in the memory.
Toyotas are definitely not the worse. My crossfire NOBODY can make a duplicate except Mercedes they come preprogrammed by the vin from Denver or somewhere. Keys were $175 and went to $900 overnight with no warning. They’ve came down to $324.95 because someone finally broke the software and made a “screem” delete. Guess why they came down to $325 and guess how much a screem delete is…

Don’t get me started on tire pressure monitors. 🤐
 

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Well, where there is a will or should I say demand, there will always be a way. Even though manufacturers are making every attempt to lock down the vehicles, making it harder to service at indies, there are still enough alternatives and options for hobbyists and casual users. How long that lasts depends. This is no different from the consumer goods market where corps like Apple are making every effort to prevent repair access to its devices. Our neighbor had an issue with his Trane AC and could not find an Indie to service it, why!!!!, because Trane uses proprietary tech to lock down its boards which can only be serviced by their own techs.
 

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I had a local Mobile Locksmith program and cut a new smart key for me on the spot

$200 bucks for 10 minutes of work (I'm in the wrong business)
I'm not paying $200 to some random locksmith. I'd rather pay the $300 to the dealer for the same thing. But that's only if I can't use my own tools to program the key I get cut at Ace Hardware for $5.
 
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