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What rustproofing do you use?

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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious to know how many people Rust proof their Sienna.

I've done both Krown and now I've switched over to Rust check this year. I had lackluster service from Krown (missed spots, missed reinstalling plugs etc.)

Let us know what you do to keep your Sienna looking good.

Regards, JC.
 

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Here in the lower 48, rustproofing was exposed as a total scam back in the 70's.

The manufacturer takes care of it. Don't let some yahoo drill holes and spray in wunderstuff.

Now, if you are someone who puts a glass slipper of Seafoam in the petrol tank on alternate Wednesdays because it "Helps the get up and go, and keeps the valves blown out", or if you buy those clear plastic seat covers then disregard my advice and just get it rustproofed as a package deal when they install the vinyl top.

<G>

Seriously, hadn't heard rustproofing mentioned in anything close to a favorable light in over twenty years. Tons of TV exposes, lawsuits, etc., etc. etc. and I am surprised to hear that is even offered these days.
 

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Also keep in mind that when you drill holes in the painted/protected surface and add goop, you are trading Toyota's corrosion warranty for the coverage provided by Pete The RustProofin' Guy.

When the corrosion starts at the spots where they sprayed the gunk, or at the hole they drilled, Toyota will wisely decline to repair the damage.

I haven't seen Pete's financials, but I'll bet on Toyota as more capable of paying warranty claims in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Sshallen,

Actually the rust proofing I'm referring to is actually very good. They drill holes in your doors and body cavities and use a long wand with compressed air to spray a fine mist of their rustproofing along the insides of your body panels and undercarriage.

It protects the metal and the wiring as well since we all know that oil and water do not mix.

If you see vehichles that have this applied every year after 10 years they look good as new. I know these days the materials used in vehicle manufacturing are vastly superior, but up here with lots of road salt I see cars that have rust on certain body parts after 4 to 5 years. Even Mercedes with rust on them.

If you lease your vehicle or only keep it for 4-6 years then this is probably a waste of time. But where I live and how long I keep my vehicles it's a wise investment in my books.

I usually by a vehicle well out of warranty (that's why I buy a Toyota and not an older domestic product
I'm not worried about Toyota declining anything! ;D In fact I'm not even looking forward to visiting them to get my tire cable inspected so I can hear the list of things that the dealership needs to have done to my vehicle to pay for Dealership owner's toys! LOL

Regards, JC.
 

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Really sounds like confusion between correlation and causation.

Owners very concerned about corrosion do things that help (select better vehicles without crash damage, touch up chips, wash and wax, drive carefully, etc.) and things that don't (drill holes in vehicle, spray special potions into the dark areas, said potions expected to "seal" things that the factory was too dumb to seal, etc.).

When they then experience (or anecdotally believe they experience) less corrosion, they may not be able to determine if it was chance, the things they did that help prevent corrosion, or the things they did that didn't help.

And an industry can be made on that confusion!

I think all the nationally-publicized scams, admissions by the insiders that there was no scientific basis to the claims, etc. just killed the industry down here, but it's interesting to hear that it is alive and well up north.

I still remember "Hello Rusty Jones! Goodbye, rusty cars!" and "Ziebart - It's us, or rust!" commercials! Rusty Jones is bankrupt of course, but Zeibart now sells things like "DiamondShield", the ONLY lifetime paint wax treatment for a mere $389.95 (it's wax), fabric sprays, sound deadening sprays and even good old "rust proofing".

" They drill holes in your doors and body cavities and use a long wand with compressed air to spray a fine mist of their rustproofing along the insides of your body panels and undercarriage. " How I would love to get a vial of that mist to the lab!!!
 

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There are still lots of advocates of various "rustproofing" processes; I am certainly not one of them.

Rustproofing approaches seem to fit in two categories:
  • tarry stuff to protect exposed surfaces
  • oily mists sprayed in enclosed areas

The tarry stuff is particularly annoying to me. This is the stuff which plugs drain holes and causes rust; it is also a major pain in the neck for anyone working on the vehicle later. It was created decades ago when the manufacturers did nothing for the bottom of the vehicle beyond a normal coat of paint; this hasn't been the case for many years. This type of treatment is certainly still sold; some Toyota dealers around here display a car (typically a Yaris) rolled on its side on a stand, with half of the underside covered in tarry stuff, and the other half unsullied. It's an advertisement, but looking at that stuff - or worse, touching it - should drive anyone away.

The sprayed-in mists would make sense if there is exposed bare metal in the areas to be treated... but there isn't. These treatments are regularly repeated, and I suspect that carefully looking at the body and addressing any concerns (unplugging drain holes, fixing scrapes, etc) is the real value of the process. I don't let anyone drill holes in my sheet metal.

I drove a 1984 Tercel for about 17 years and while there was lots of rust by the end, it was generally started from places where rock chips and scrapes had compromised the paint. It was not "rustproofed" aftermarket. Certainly the floor didn't rust out like my parents' 1971 Chev wagon (which dissolved in less than 8 years), but to be fair the Chev was driven in a high-salt-use area, while my Tercel was in Alberta.
 

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I've used RustCheck brand rust proofing for years on my vehicles. I find that using a dedicated dealer who only does rustproofing is your best bet. Those who do it as a side business/add on might not have properly trained staff who will miss areas etc. The location I go to even advised me to take off the spare tire underneath so that they can evenly spray the bottom.

I go for the coat and protect package which uses the "no drip" (gel formula on the undercarriage that doesn't dry and is self healing) and the regular oil spray in the rest of the body panels. The only issue I have is that over time (I keep vehicles 8+ years) the rubber seals, gaskets etc. can swell and become soft.

A newer product being pushed is Corrosion Free (corrosionfree.com) apparently it doesn't swell rubber items.

A vehicle driven in an area where salt/brine de-icing solution is dumped on the roads during winter will benefit from it. Florida or the lower states, probably overkill.

Just stay away from electronic gagets! Dealerships can bunch these in expensive packages so do your homework.
 

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Chemguy said:
...I keep vehicles 8+ years...
If I ever part with a vehicle only eight years old, you'll know that I won a lottery or bought a real lemon. I assume that in a rust protection discussion, we're talking about keeping the vehicle a long time. ;)
 

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I just upgraded from a '92 Mazda MPV with the new Sienna so I think 18 years qualifies. Also have '97 Grand Am and '99 Mazda 626 all in excellent condition. I like to buy new and drive a vehicle to the ground. I agree with you that taking care of stone chips and scratches are required. This is usually where the rust you see starts. It's the rust from the "inside out" that you don't see which benefits from an annual or every two year treatment. (depending on your budget)

The 2010 has multiple rubber plugs that can be removed to access door panels without drilling. I assume these were designed into the vehicle for rust proofing purposes. The dealership that I purchased my Sienna from offered both electronic and traditional oil spraying but I went with Rustcheck as I've had good results so far. I compare how my vehicles look to similar models on the road and can tell where the trouble spots are. I'm confident that through proper maintenance and rustproofing most vehicles can last a long time.

Here a timely article that I read this morning.

http://autos.sympatico.ca/advice-guides/6973/rustproofing-fact-and-fiction
 

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Krown for me. Bought my 2004 in Jan 2009 and had it treated in spring 2009 and summer 2010. It was in good shape when I got it and plan to keep it that way. In general, Toyota vehicles seem to age well when it comes to rust...can't say the same for Mazda (my other car is a protege5).
 

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brian_bp said:
There are still lots of advocates of various "rustproofing" processes; I am certainly not one of them.

Rustproofing approaches seem to fit in two categories:
  • tarry stuff to protect exposed surfaces
  • oily mists sprayed in enclosed areas

The tarry stuff is particularly annoying to me. This is the stuff which plugs drain holes and causes rust; it is also a major pain in the neck for anyone working on the vehicle later. It was created decades ago when the manufacturers did nothing for the bottom of the vehicle beyond a normal coat of paint; this hasn't been the case for many years. This type of treatment is certainly still sold; some Toyota dealers around here display a car (typically a Yaris) rolled on its side on a stand, with half of the underside covered in tarry stuff, and the other half unsullied. It's an advertisement, but looking at that stuff - or worse, touching it - should drive anyone away.

The sprayed-in mists would make sense if there is exposed bare metal in the areas to be treated... but there isn't. These treatments are regularly repeated, and I suspect that carefully looking at the body and addressing any concerns (unplugging drain holes, fixing scrapes, etc) is the real value of the process. I don't let anyone drill holes in my sheet metal.

I drove a 1984 Tercel for about 17 years and while there was lots of rust by the end, it was generally started from places where rock chips and scrapes had compromised the paint. It was not "rustproofed" aftermarket. Certainly the floor didn't rust out like my parents' 1971 Chev wagon (which dissolved in less than 8 years), but to be fair the Chev was driven in a high-salt-use area, while my Tercel was in Alberta.
I have to agree that Krown/rustcheck are annoying as far as the mess goes (do the treatment for a couple years and you will see what I mean). That being said, I am sold and will continue to "Krown" my vehicles as long as I drive. The main reason I've gotten rid of cars was because of the rust (obviously prior to my pledged allegiance to Krown).

Now that my van is almost 8 years old I am finding that when it is time for repairs things come apart quite easily. My 1998 camry has been Krowned or Rust Checked a lot, when I bought it 3+ years ago it was absolutely black inside the doors around the hinges etc. I think that you still need to keep an eye on the scratches and stone chips but Krown does help. I live in Southern Ontario = damp, cold, wet all winter.

We used to apply way more salt than the western provinces to our roads, not sure if that is true anymore... (my buddy drove his 1972 olds home from Alberta with very minor rust and it was 25+ years old when he did it)

A good wash will also go a long way!

My brother has an '03 mazda protege that is rust free (not a common thing in Ontario for this model) and Krowned yearly since new.

My two cents!
 

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I am a big fan of rust check.

But I would only recamend any rust proofing if certain conditions apply to you.

If you want to keep a vehicle as long as possible, and wear out the drive train, possibly even replace an engine or transmission if required then rust check is definatly worth the money.

If you plan to keep your vehicle longer then 5 years AND you live some where that vehcles suffer from rusting due to heavy use of salt and sand on winter roads such as ontario

or if you live in a moist maritime climate such as newfoundland where i am from and vehicles commonly rust apart before the engine or transmission give out. we also have large amounts of salt on the roads in winter. if you see a 20 year old rust free vehicle in newfoundland then it most likely has a rust check sticker on it.

if its suny and dry all year or very cold and dry in winter(rust does not occur below a certain temperature not sure what right now) then any rust proofing is probably overkill or a waist of money.

if you trade your vehicle every 5 years then it is definatly a waist of money

just my opinion but i have seen many older rust free vehicles that were rust checked. My sunfire is 10 years old and has no rust, i will let you know how it is in another 10 years. My fathers 15 year old cavalier has no rust as well and was rust checked since new.
 

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mmorriso said:
Krown for me. Bought my 2004 in Jan 2009 and had it treated in spring 2009 and summer 2010. It was in good shape when I got it and plan to keep it that way. In general, Toyota vehicles seem to age well when it comes to rust...can't say the same for Mazda (my other car is a protege5).
More proof Krown is worth the money. My Brother has an '03 protege with NO rust on it. Can't be said for many others I see on the road. Been Krowned since new! :) Living in the GTA area (read: lots of moisture and salt!)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I will agree that Mazda's Protege 5 and 3's and terrible for rust around the wheel wells.

Regards, JC.
 

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I hate undercoating, because I work on my vehicles. After years of dealing with this disgusting crap all over the bottom of our 1988 Honda CRX, I was reminded of how pointless it is just today when I tried to jack it up by the rocker jacking point to change a tire, and the jack punched the reinforced section right in. All four fenders rusted right through many years ago; the jacking point was probably long gone, too, but I had not noticed because I usually use jacking points under the middle of the front (on the subframe) and the middle of the back (at the tie-down), rather than the rocker points which the manual says to use.
 

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If you plan to keep you vehicle for less than 10 years, then why bother with undercoating.

It's ~$100 per treatment, and you can also choose to do it every 2 years and save some cash.
 

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I hate undercoating, because I work on my vehicles. After years of dealing with this disgusting crap all over the bottom of our 1988 Honda CRX, I was reminded of how pointless it is just today when I tried to jack it up by the rocker jacking point to change a tire, and the jack punched the reinforced section right in. All four fenders rusted right through many years ago; the jacking point was probably long gone, too, but I had not noticed because I usually use jacking points under the middle of the front (on the subframe) and the middle of the back (at the tie-down), rather than the rocker points which the manual says to use.
I also work on my own vehicles and have been surprised at how easily some bits have come apart on my 8+ year old van with 250,000 kms on it. Like I said, I'm sold on Krown... :)
Messy but it works! (IMHO)
 

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If you plan to keep your Toyota or any vehicle for that matter, here is a tip from a retired pro mechanic..... Any exposed metal lines eg. Brake, Fuel, Coolant, Power Steering, Transmission, Air Conditioning etc. will benefit significantly from an annual inspection and touch-up with a good rust proofing spray that is oil or wax based. Find yourself a good mechanic and stick with him/her once you are able to build a good relationship... they are very familiar with these lines and their locations. Respect their time and pay them an extra 1/2hr labour to do this maint also keep a can of the product with the vehicle to do your own touching up on any exposed metal parts under the hood or around door openings, works great on door hinges as well. After a while these areas will become saturated and may no longer need spraying. Automatic Transmission Fluid makes for a very good rustproofing but may have an undesirable odour for some. Cheers
 
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