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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
FlashLogic FLRSBA remote start and Carlink ASCL6 installation writeup (plug n' play)

Okay, so I finally got around to installing the FlashLogic FLRSBA remote start and CarLink ASCL6 module that allows for smartphone control in my 2014 Sienna XLE with PTS (push to start button) that I bought a couple months ago and did a quick and dirty photo write up.

I can't recommend it more highly since it is 100% plug and play and easy to install, works great (although a big caveat that it does not support "takeover", but the non-plug n' play installation for non-PTS Siennas do support takeover), can be controlled remotely by my phone, allows GPS tracking of your vehicle, and other features (if you have compatible aftermarket alarm or other equipment installed).


[Part 1]

What and where to buy
:

1. FlashLogic FLRSBA (remote start unit)



- This is the remote start module. Can also control door lock/unlock and some other functions that I have not figured out yet.
- I bought my first FLRSBA from a (notorious) regional car installation outfit called Car Toys. It's not on their website and they had only one in stock in all their regional stores. The second one I bought online at ADC Mobile (link below). The only place really to find it online that I have found. Costs about $170+shipping.
- It turns out ADC is near Seattle and while they don't have a retail brick and mortar business they did let me come out to pick one up in person. Great outfit and highly recommend them. I don't think you can find the FLRSBA anywhere else online right now.
- Get it here: https://www.adcmobile.com/product/flashlogic-data-module/

2. CarLink ASCL6




- This is the module that connects with the FLRSBA and allows you to control your FLRSBA via smartphone app.
- Includes a cable that connects it to the FLRSBA.
- Bought both CarLink ASCL6 modules from ADC for about $170+shipping each: https://www.adcmobile.com/product/carlink-ascl6-telematics-module/. You can also get it on Crutchfield also (with free shipping): https://www.crutchfield.com/S-HRDe5DYVcKr/p_220ASCL6/Code-Alarm-ASCL6-CarLink.html
- These are both intended as dealer installations (not typically sold retail) but you can install on your own if you register on idatalink (for the WebLink cable/app use).
- The CarLink needs to be setup in the iOS/android app ("CL6") and requires the serial number of the ASCL6.
- Note: the first year of use is free but about $30/year to use afterwards (it uses 3G signals for 2-way communication between your phone/app and the module.

3. iDataLink ADS-THR-TL7 wire harness



- This is the critical harness you need to make the installation 100% plug n' play. It connects the FLRSBA to the Sienna's ECM and steering lock wiring ports. How awesome is that?
- Hard to find online when I was searching for it (haven't checked recently) and I ended up buying from an outfit in Canada (https://lockdownsecuritycanada.ca/products/idatastart-ads-thr-tl7-toyota-lexus-t-harness) that shipped it to me from Ontario, Canada to Seatte, WA in less than a week for $60 CAD (Canadian dollars) + shipping. Highly recommend them.

4. WebLink Mobile FLWLMAP1 (or FLWLMAN1) cable



- This is the iOS compatible cable that allows you to flash the FLRSBA from your iPhone (rather than from your computer). Very convenient. There is also an Android version of this cable too: FLWLMAN1.
- Note: I think you can flash via the computer as well probably but did not look into how to do that.
- This was the hardest of the 4 components that I needed to find. I ended up buying it from a 3rd party seller on Newegg for about $100 shipped (no link as they only had one for sale).
- Like mentioned before, you do have to register online to use the cable/app. It's a simple process though but necessary, and can be done here: http://www.flashlogic.com/weblink/user/registration

(to be cont'd)
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
[Part 2]

Installation Steps:

Note, most of the installation is shown in a great youtube video that is found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IK05t2y6nOs&list=PLPfzaETF6A77-JQzEGBRUI9wuxFcw1uWG&index=7&t=361s


1. Remove steering wheel lower shroud/trim/garnish, to access the steering lock port.

- Turn the engine on so that you can turn the steering wheel to expose the two phillips screws on each side of the steering wheel base. Only one is exposed at a time.
- There is a top and lower half of the black plastic steering wheel column cover. The video shows how you press in under the border between the top and bottom half to unsnap the clips. The top cover is attached by a flexible material to the dash but does not matter as only the bottom cover needs to be removed.



2. Remove driver side lower dash trim (around the knee airbag), to access the ECM port.

- Start by removing the driver side plastic cover next to the door on the floor that covers the wiring. Just lift upwards to unlatch the clips. Be careful with this step too as I've done this a number of times for other projects and some of the plastic pieces have broken and now it does not attach tightly anymore.



- Then remove the kick panel cover by pulling off the black plastic cover of the screw on the right side and then pulling rearwards.



- Remove two 10mm bolts on either side of the lower dash cover. There are like 8-10 clips holding the cover on. Take care to damage or lose the clips as they keep the cover attached around the knee airbag cover.




- Now, carefully pull out the lower dash cover. There are a few plugs to unplug (2 on the right side in my '14 XLE) and one on the left side. Also, you will want to remove the hood release switch from the cover which can be done without too much difficulty. Removing the gas tank cover release switch would be helpful but I could not figure out how to remove it for some reason but there is enough slack in the wire to do the install without removing it. Take care not to bend the wire too much.








3. Find the ECU under the dash.

- This is shown well in the video and it's also in the pics. Pull out the male stock wire plug and connect that male harness into the female VS4 port on the ADS-THR-TL7 wire harness.



- Connect the male VS3 plug into the female ECM port in the car.





- Go to the steering wheel column and unplug the male plug from the female car ignition lock port and connect it to the female VS2 port on the ADS-THR-TL7 wire harness.



- Connect the male VS1 plug on the ADS-THR-TL7 wire harness to the female ignition lock port on the car steering column.



- THAT'S IT for the wiring connections (assuming you already connected the ASCL6 to the FLRSBA via the cable included with the ASCL6)!

4. Connect the FLRSBA to the ASCL6 if not done already.



5. Flash the FLRSBA

- Plug the WebLink Mobile cable and connect it to your phone via appropriate iOS or android cable and the OBDII port (for power, although I am not sure it needs it for the Sienna but I did it anyway).
- Turn on the WebLink Mobile app on your phone and proceed to flashing it.
- YMMV, but for me, I only had several options for firmware and ended up having to choose the "Code Alarm and CarLink" firmware to get it to work, but it does work fine with that firmware. Before flashing there are a lot of settings you can change but I am not sure which ones actually will do anything since it depends on your set up (if you have a compatible aftermarket alarm, etc.). I did set the duration of the remote start (options are 3/5/10/15/25/30/35 min).
- NOTES: there is NO TAKEOVER available in the PTS ("push to start") Siennas, only the ones that use the physical key to start the engine, so the engine will always shut down when you open the door (but not with unlocking the door).
- Also, I found with some fiddling that it seems that "re-lock after remote start shutdown" needs to be activated in order for the headlights to be turned off without opening the door (e.g. if you remote start on and either turn it off via CarLink or let it time out, but either way not opening the door at any point during the remote start). Without that being set to re-lock, the lights will stay on and drain the battery. This only applies to when the headlights are set to "on" and not "auto." Auto lights will only turn on after you enter the car (stopping the remote start) and then turn on the engine. I also set "re-lock after start" to on as it does not seem to auto-lock the car after remote starting, which is a security (but not theft of vehicle) threat.



6. Activate the FLRSBA

- Easy directions in the FlashLogic installation manual for activating the FLRSBA to work with the OEM remote (which is what I did, but you can also use a compatible aftermarket remote, which has a longer activation sequence), but basically: press "start" twice to turn car electronics on, then press "start" again once to turn it off, then turn on engine for 15 seconds, then press brake and while holding brake press and release the program button on the side of the ASCL6 then release the brake -- that's it!
- There are some LED color changes on the ASCL6 that are described in the installation manual.

7. Stow/tie/tape down the FLRSBA and ASCL6

- ASCL6 should face upwards (the side that does not say "THIS SIDE DOWN") when installed.

8. Re-install all covers/screws/bolts

- Everything in reverse.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
[Part 3]
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Just bumping this thread to give an update.

It's been 8 months since I installed the FlashLogic FLRSBA remote start and the CarLink ASCL 6 module that allows smartphone control of the remote start, and it's been awesome. Way better than the OEM remote start for sure.

Some of the highlights:

1. Installation is plug and play (no splicing/cutting/etc.) and fairly easy if you have some experience with this type of project.

2. Configurable. For instance, you can configure it so that it will stay on longer (I set it for 30 minutes but it can be longer than that if you want). There are many other things you can configure, which may require other accessories/components which I did not use.

3. The cost is comparable to or less than the OEM remote start (which is trash anyway and I removed mine).

4. More widely available now. Easier to find now than it was back early in 2018 when I installed mine. You can buy all components online at reputable dealers (like Sonic Electronix and Crutchfield). The only exception is the WebLink Mobile cable that you need to program/flash the remote start module using your smart phone. No big merchants for that one but you can find it online at least.

5. Smartphone integration/control. The best part is the CarLink integration so that you can do everything on your smartphone: turn engine on/off, lock/unlock doors, and some other functions if you have configured it to do other stuff. It's nice because you can see if your doors are locked/unlocked (useful if you park on the street like me) from your phone and the time remaining on the remote start also is displayed which is nice. It's also easy to "restart" the remote start before the time runs out if you want to extend the duration the engine stays on.

6. Works with OEM keyfob. Don't need a separate aftermarket keyfob to use the remote start (if you don't want to use CarLink), you can use the OEM keyfob.

7. Great range. Uses built in cellular (or keyfob if you want) connection to communicate with your smart phone so the range is incredible: can remote start your car from another building, across town, if you want. You need a PIN to access the app to prevent starting your car if you lost your phone (and it was unlocked or something). The OEM remote start had a pitiful range that made it useless for me.

8. GPS built in. This lets you track your car location via your phone. I think you can use this to potentially lower your car insurance rate (like a Lojack could).


Only negatives:

1. No "takeover." The main drawback is shared by the OEM remote start, which is the lack of "takeover" on PTS (push to start) Siennas which results in the engine shutting off when you unlock/open the doors. The non-PTS Siennas can do "takeover" though but requires some wire splicing during installation.

2. Costs money to keep using the cellular connection for CarLink. $30/year (first year free) which is pretty reasonable though I think.

3. Does rely on cellular signal to work with your smartphone (with CarLink). To work with your smartphone you need access to 3G signal (mine uses AT&T), so this won't work in the mountains where there is no signal. Not sure if it would work in Canada (or Mexico), probably not, but I'll test that out this weekend when I visit our Northerly neighbors. You can, however, still use it using the keyfob (RF?) by pressing lock three times (but not in a short amount of times like the OEM remote start, which I found annoying), but you'll have to be closer to your car for it to work then.

Overall though, I can't recommend this more highly for any Sienna owner (and no, I'm not affiliated in any way to any of the companies that make these products).
 

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Just bumping this thread to give an update.

It's been 8 months since I installed the FlashLogic FLRSBA remote start and the CarLink ASCL 6 module that allows smartphone control of the remote start, and it's been awesome. Way better than the OEM remote start for sure.

Some of the highlights:

1. Installation is plug and play (no splicing/cutting/etc.) and fairly easy if you have some experience with this type of project.

2. Configurable. For instance, you can configure it so that it will stay on longer (I set it for 30 minutes but it can be longer than that if you want). There are many other things you can configure, which may require other accessories/components which I did not use.

3. The cost is comparable to or less than the OEM remote start (which is trash anyway and I removed mine).

4. More widely available now. Easier to find now than it was back early in 2018 when I installed mine. You can buy all components online at reputable dealers (like Sonic Electronix and Crutchfield). The only exception is the WebLink Mobile cable that you need to program/flash the remote start module using your smart phone. No big merchants for that one but you can find it online at least.

5. Smartphone integration/control. The best part is the CarLink integration so that you can do everything on your smartphone: turn engine on/off, lock/unlock doors, and some other functions if you have configured it to do other stuff. It's nice because you can see if your doors are locked/unlocked (useful if you park on the street like me) from your phone and the time remaining on the remote start also is displayed which is nice. It's also easy to "restart" the remote start before the time runs out if you want to extend the duration the engine stays on.

6. Works with OEM keyfob. Don't need a separate aftermarket keyfob to use the remote start (if you don't want to use CarLink), you can use the OEM keyfob.

7. Great range. Uses built in cellular (or keyfob if you want) connection to communicate with your smart phone so the range is incredible: can remote start your car from another building, across town, if you want. You need a PIN to access the app to prevent starting your car if you lost your phone (and it was unlocked or something). The OEM remote start had a pitiful range that made it useless for me.

8. GPS built in. This lets you track your car location via your phone. I think you can use this to potentially lower your car insurance rate (like a Lojack could).


Only negatives:

1. No "takeover." The main drawback is shared by the OEM remote start, which is the lack of "takeover" on PTS (push to start) Siennas which results in the engine shutting off when you unlock/open the doors. The non-PTS Siennas can do "takeover" though but requires some wire splicing during installation.

2. Costs money to keep using the cellular connection for CarLink. $30/year (first year free) which is pretty reasonable though I think.

3. Does rely on cellular signal to work with your smartphone (with CarLink). To work with your smartphone you need access to 3G signal (mine uses AT&T), so this won't work in the mountains where there is no signal. Not sure if it would work in Canada (or Mexico), probably not, but I'll test that out this weekend when I visit our Northerly neighbors. You can, however, still use it using the keyfob (RF?) by pressing lock three times (but not in a short amount of times like the OEM remote start, which I found annoying), but you'll have to be closer to your car for it to work then.

Overall though, I can't recommend this more highly for any Sienna owner (and no, I'm not affiliated in any way to any of the companies that make these products).

I just installed an aftermarket EVO-ONE remote start in my 2015 Toyota Rav4. The remote start works perfectly with the key remote and the additional Long Range remote I installed. The problem is that I installed the Car Link ASCL6 Telemantics Smart phone module (same as yours) which works with the EVO-ONE but the car won't start. The phone app shows the status of my battery voltage, doors locked/unlocked status, GPS location, and signal. All of those things work on the app but when I press the start button on the app it turns blue but won't start...it then turns back to white.

As you can see from the photos, I do get confirmation on the battery voltage, GPS location, door status, and signal.



I know you're not associated with the company but I was wondering if you knew what it could be? I contacted the support for Car Link but it's after hours so I won't hear back from them until they're available...hopefully soon.



Thanks!

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just installed an aftermarket EVO-ONE remote start in my 2015 Toyota Rav4. The remote start works perfectly with the key remote and the additional Long Range remote I installed. The problem is that I installed the Car Link ASCL6 Telemantics Smart phone module (same as yours) which works with the EVO-ONE but the car won't start. The phone app shows the status of my battery voltage, doors locked/unlocked status, GPS location, and signal. All of those things work on the app but when I press the start button on the app it turns blue but won't start...it then turns back to white.

As you can see from the photos, I do get confirmation on the battery voltage, GPS location, door status, and signal.

I know you're not associated with the company but I was wondering if you knew what it could be? I contacted the support for Car Link but it's after hours so I won't hear back from them until they're available...hopefully soon.

Thanks!

Brian
Sorry I didn't respond sooner but I wouldn't have been any help anyway probably. I did google your setup and found that it seems you found your solution/answer from someone online:

Anythony thanks so much! I got it working! You were right about the long range remote. I disconnected the long range remote antenna but left the HRN-LLRS-01 wire harness on. I went through the process again of putting the EVO-ONE in programming mode for setting up the module, and first try I got it!

I don't need to use the long range remote anyway since sometimes it wouldn't even turn on the car from 2 blocks away!
Glad that you got it working. :smile:

Were you using the long range remote b/c you wanted to use the keyfob specifically? The beauty of CarLink is that you don't need to use the keyfob at all (I never do except to test it out) -- the app does everything quite effectively/reliably. I rarely have any issues with connecting with CarLink.
 
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