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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year we got a bad snow storm in Western Washington. My tires had 50k miles on them, and I was helpless. Tried to come out a few times and got stuck. A truck driver helped me get unstuck.
This year I have brand new tires. I am thinking of buying traction boards and a shovel. I can't use chains because I will be doing a lot of highway driving(60 mph). I am also thinking of airing down to like 25 psi. What else do you recommend? Can a FWD Sienna tackle snow, specially snow on hilly paved roads. Thank you 馃檹
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Get a second set of cheap rims and throw some winter tires on it . I'm ready.

I bought mine of season for $100/4 tires still 11/32. Lol

View attachment 58945

Or some aggressive 3 peak rate AT. Like my other car.

View attachment 58946


Oh and throw some s-chain for security just in case.
The silver Sienna in the second picture looks like a Highlander killer SUV lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've used (on an Accord) and can recommend Bridgestone Blizzak tires. From my coworker and research, Blizzak or Michelin X-Ice are the best studless winter tires you can buy.

Here's an old video from TireRack comparing all-season to studless winter tires. All season tires have gotten better since then, but so have studless winter tires.

Here's a video from them from 2018 on an ice rink, comparing all-season to studless winter tires.

Note two key things I've taken away from my research:
  • Traction on ice is determined primarily from tread compound, not remaining tread depth. Tread design plays some part into this, but it's primarily a function of compound. So new, deep tread tires won't really help, only dedicated winter tire compounds.
  • Traction on snow and slush is helped by tread compound, but is primarily a function of tread design, and more importantly, remaining tread depth. My Blizzak tires therefore came with two minimum treadwear depth wear bars. The first was the typical minimum tread depth of 2/32", which is recommended minimum by DOT and legal minimum in many states. The second was the Bridgestone recommended minimum depth for winter use, which I believe was at 6/32" (the tire starts with 11/32")
Note that any tire will be greatly helped in the winter on snow by not running down to 2/32". So even if you don't get winter tires, if the set of tires you are running gets down to 6/32" or so, ti's probably time to change them (or take them off and wait for winter to be done before putting them on to finish running them down to 2/32").

For someone who drives for a living in an area with ice and snow, I'd highly recommend getting a second set of wheels with dedicated, high quality studless winter tires. Swap them on when winter hits, and take them off as soon as you don't any more snow or ice of significant amounts. The downside to winter tires is they are louder, may have decreased fuel economy, and are softer so the vehicle handles worse on clean, dry pavement than other tire types. They also will disintegrate if used in warm weather on dry pavement. But they cannot be beat for winter use except by studded tires or tire chains.

I've heard that Discount Tire/America's Tire charges roughly $150/year to swap summer to winter tires, and store the winter tires, if you buy the winter tires through them. And this is pulling your old tires off your wheels and putting the other set of tires on. If you buy a second set of wheels, and just have them swap the wheels, I suspect a swap would run you $40 or less. Maybe even free if you buy the wheels from them, since they offer 6000 mile rotations for free, so you could ask if they could just swap the tires in place of a normal rotation? But if you don't have the space or desire to buy a second set of wheels, $150 a year to swap them and have them store the set of unused tires is quite an excellent deal.

I had the space, so I just bought a pre-mounted, pre-balanced set of winter tires mounted on cheap steel wheels from TireRack and they shipped them to my door, ready to mount. If you go with the second set of wheels/tires option and do DIY swaps, you may need a TPMS tool to set TPMS. I had to with our Hondas, but I'm not sure how the Toyota Sienna's handle TPMS.
This is what I bought two days ago. Michelin Latitude X-Ice? This is what you are refering to? It is not winter tire, it does not have those little sharp metals on it.

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Today I kept slipping going uphill in rain. Very embarrasing and a safety concern when passengers are sitting in the back. These X-Ice tries slept in rain while my all seasons used to do fine in rain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Hey, can you update if you鈥檙e still having issues in the rain? I just realized, all new tires will be slippery when first used, they have mold release compounds on them from manufacturing, and it takes several hundred miles to break in and stop being slippery, especially in the rain.
Yes I'm still having issues in the rain, but now I have learned how to avoid it, a little bit of momentum helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I find this problem really weird. My stock crappy falkens are awesome in the snow and rain. I live near Boston. I find it hard to believe that the Michelins are that bad. I have those tires too.
I find it very odd as well. My last tires were almost bald, and I was still not slipping in the rain. These snow and ice rated Michelins are brand new. Anytime I climb a hill in the rain, it slips. Couple of times I made my passengers pretty nervous
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
They're not winter tires but worked well last winter in that I95 storm.

Drove about 6k miles in wintery conditions thru upstate NY, PA, Virginias.

Your X-ice are much better in moderate to alot of snow and ice... see my other post for possible alignment issues or similar.

In any more snow then just a sprinkle your X-ice should be much better then the Falkens.
Thanks. And that's exactly why I bought these tires. Some slipping here and there in the rain is fine with me, I just want them to do a decent job in snow this year. Thanks again, I'm excited for the snow
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 · (Edited)
They're not winter tires but worked well last winter in that I95 storm.

Drove about 6k miles in wintery conditions thru upstate NY, PA, Virginias.

Your X-ice are much better in moderate to alot of snow and ice... see my other post for possible alignment issues or similar.

In any more snow then just a sprinkle your X-ice should be much better then the Falkens.
Pretty impressive so far in this slush. Now we are talking. Looks like this X-Ice Michelins are only bad in rain, not in slush.
Crawled that hill at like 10 mph, no problems!

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