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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It seems a bit late to be doing this on our 2014 Sienna as we enter our forth winter with it but the past couple of days of driving in winter slush has pushed me over the edge. Stopping on long trips in darkness to wipe down headlight lenses with a wet rag in windy, below freezing conditions is not my idea of fun and is becoming less acceptable as the years pass.

So ... today I ordered one of the simpler Hella headlamp washer kits on Amazon Prime Germany. I've bought a lot of stuff from non-US eBay sites but this is the first time I've bought anything from a non-US Amazon site. So far, it's looking almost too good to be true and that I'm going to avoid VAT and U.S. customs and pay less than half what I would pay a direct seller or a seller on eBay Germany.

The kit I bought is the HELLA 8WS 008 549-001 which is commonly installed on non-complying vehicles imported into Europe. Sienna Chat member and German national coasterfan sort of put me up to this when he posted a photo on his blog of a Sienna owned by a Swiss acquaintance that obviously has this kit: http://toyota-sienna-in-germany.blogspot.com/2016/04/sienna-limited-aus-der-schweiz.html

Unlike that Swiss Sienna, my plan is to use all four spray nozzles that come with the kit but how I do it depends on what I find after I remove the Sienna's front bumper cover. I've enlisted the help of a young friend and fellow car nut (he's only 75) and the use of an empty stall in his much larger garage.

This project "should be" a lot easier if can add a third pump to the existing reservoir per the installation instructions and similar to how it works on other vehicles made by Toyota that have OEM headlamp washers. Otherwise, I'm going to have to source and somehow install a separate washer fluid tank. I don't know if I will do it initially but I also plan to put a switch on the lower left of the dashboard that allows turning off the headlight washers so that they do not always operate when the headlamps are on and the windshield is cleaned.

Stay tuned. It will be a few weeks until the kit arrives and I start this project. My plan is to take photos and post them in this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Attached are installation instructions in case anyone is interesting in installing this kit. I had to use a variety of techniques to pare the size of the instructions way down so they could be posted on this forum. I assume I'll get a hard copy of the instructions with the washer kit which was shipped in Germany yesterday according to an Amazon email notification.

The instructions are typical of accessory installation instructions for Europe in that they rely much more on diagrams than words. Toyota's multi-country accessory installation instructions for Europe look a lot like Hella's, i.e. not always easy to interpret.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The attached photo shows where I'm going to mount the Hella headlamp washer relay and some of the Sienna components involved in the installation.

There happens to be two conveniently positioned unused threaded (M6 metric) holes on the passenger side of the engine compartment. Does anyone know what their purpose is? Our Sienna Limited has all option packages so I wonder if these thread holes are for mounting components use on Sienna sold in other countries. Regardless, I should be able to attach the Hella kit's relay receptacle to one or both of the threaded holes.

The location of the Hella relay will be barely six inches from the passenger side parking light positive wire I will attach to. Doing this will limit the headlamp washers to function only when the low beam headlamps are on saving washing fluid. I'm going to depart from the installation instructions and splice into the wire between the Hella relay and the parking lamp and run wires to a dashboard mounted switch that allows turning the headlamp washing system off when I don't want it to function when the headlamps are on - largely to conserve washer fluid in warm weather when I'm just trying to clean bugs off the windshield.

I could probably just ground the Hella kit to bolt that is going to hold the Hella relay but there is a robust common ground nearby - might as well use it.

And of course the washer fluid container is conveniently located nearby. Whether I can install the Hella kit's pump into the existing washer fluid container or have to install a separate washer fluid container used only for the headlamp washers is still to be determined - probably after I remove the front bumper cover and take a look. If I can install the Hella pump into the existing washer fluid container, I hope I can do it without having to remove the container from the vehicle. At a minimum, I'll have to siphon all the fluid from the container before drilling the hole for the Hella pump with a 20 mm forstner bit.

Per the instructions, I'll attach the Hella kit's power wire to the accessory terminal on the positive battery clamp where I attached the power wire for the trailer light harness I installed in 2014.

Edit: I later decided to ground the Hella headlight washer system at the negative battery terminal per the installation instructions and to power the Hella kit's relay trigger from the driver side parking light positive wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The attached photo doesn't really show anything except that I removed the grill today to check to see how much clearance there is under the bumper cover for the Hella headlamp washer plumbing.

I mainly wanted to peer into the cavities below the top surface of the bumper cover to see if I could safely drill the holes for the washer nozzles before I removed the bumper cover.

There is lots of clearance between the top surface of the bumper cover and the bumper beam. I think it will be much easier to drill the holes for the headlamp washer nozzles while the bumper cover is still on the vehicle than when it is off the vehicle and less rigid.

If there weren't plastic parts there for (I think) directing airflow to the radiator, I might have been able to install this washer kit without removing the bumper cover.

Removing the grill was super easy - held in place by only six fasteners at the top and some friction tabs at the bottom. (FYI, the module between the the horns is the radar unit for PCS and DRCC.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The final image for today is a mock-up of where the on/off switch for the headlamp washer system is going to be and where I'm going to relocate the rear fog lamp switch.

The green diode round Hella switch I'm currently using for the rear fog lamp will be used for the headlamp washer on/off switch. I will drill another hole below the rear quarter window switch where I will install the round Hella fog lamp switch. I never liked having the rear log lamp switch to the right of the beam level switch since the steering wheel hides it from view.

Edit: I later decided not to link the headlight washers to the windshield washers - that made the on/off switch to conserve washer fluid unnecessary. I made the headlight washers completely manual via a push button switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Hella headlight washer kit arrived today from Amazon Prime Germany. I did a parts inventory after unboxing it and everything is there which is always a relief when buying a product from outside the U.S.

I verified that its relay block and fuse holder can be mounted on the two unused M6 thread holes on the passenger side of the engine compartment. The supplied wiring harness is generous in length and shouldn't require splicing in any extensions. I hadn't realized from the installation instructions that there was a fuse holder next to the relay block. I had assumed that I would have to splice in an in-line fuse holder.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The drill bit set I will use to drill a hole in the washer fluid container for the Hella headlight washer pump and the holes in the bumper cover for the spray nozzles arrived a few days ago.

The bit set includes a 20mm bit that I will use to drill the hole in the washer fluid container for the Hella headlight washer pump and a 16mm bit I will use for the larger holes in the bumper cover for the spray nozzles. I couldn't find a kit that included the needed 17mm bit and I expected that I would have to enlarge the 16mm holes with a rat tail or half round file which is very easy to do. It turned out that the washer nozzles will just barely fit in 16mm holes.

Attached are images of the bit set I bought from Amazon and the test holes I drilled tonight in a heavy plastic cat litter container lid. This is a learning experience and I expect the next test holes to be cleaner although these are more than good enough.

Due to cold weather and several unexpected issues, it may be a few weeks before I can perform the installation.

I need to decide if I'm going to initially install only one spray nozzle on each side for the low beam headlights like is done by the importer that sells Canadian market Sienna in Switzerland or install two spray nozzles on each side so that the high beam will also be cleaned. The OEM headlight washers I've seen from Toyota like the ones on our Prius v mainly clean only the low beam headlights. I guess I could remove the front bumper cover a second time to splice in high beam headlight washers if I decide they are needed. The main issue is that four washer nozzles use a lot more washer fluid than two.

Edit: I won't be using the springs that come with the drill bits because I don't want to push to drilled out plastic pieces forward, e.g. into the the washer fluid container.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
The attached photo of a 2017 Sienna Limited Premium at a dealership in Switzerland shows the headlight washer nozzle positions that I am attempting to duplicate on my 2014 Sienna.

Since the headlight lenses are aerodynamically swept back, the nozzles are angled inward so that the water stream strikes the lenses at a 90 degree angle with maximum cleaning effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here I am drilling the larger of the two holes for the driver side nozzle using the 16mm bit after measuring a few hundred times so I don't screw up.

Not shown is the blue painter's tape I had applied to the bumper cover surface for marking on with a pencil or the small pilot hole I punched in the bumper cover with an awl before drilling the 16mm hole. Punching the pilot hole was critical to prevent the drill bit from "walking" across and damaging the surface.

Since I couldn't find an appropriate 17mm drill bit, I then enlarged the 16mm hole to 17mm with a half round file.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After enlarging the main nozzle hole to 17mm, I pressed the nozzle into the bumper cover so that I could mark where to drill the 4mm hole for the nozzle locator tab (that's what I'm calling it) which assures that the nozzle stays in position and directs the water stream at the headlight lens at a 90 degree angle
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
There are other threads and YouTube videos that show how to remove the grill and bumper cover so I won't provide step-by-step photos here.

Suffice to say it is pretty straight forward. Only six press-in fasteners hold the grill in place at the top. Tabs on the bottom of the grill press into slots. After removing the fasteners, it is a matter of carefully pulling the grill forward and out.

The bumper cover is held in place by three larger press-in fasteners in front of the radiator, ten 10mm screw bolts along the bumper cover lip, one phillips screw in each wheel well, one press-in faster in each wheel well. Tabs on the upper edge of the bumper cover outboard of the headlights snap into place.

There is a useful video on YouTube but it probably won't be there for ever:
The video makes removing the bumper cover look a little easier than it is. I found it necessary to pry the bumper cover out where it attaches at the wheel wheels using a screw driver.

Reinstalling the bumper cover is much more tedious than removing it since all portions of the bumper cover have to be aligned at the same time so that it presses/snaps back into place. Be especially careful to not damage the tabs on the edge of the bumper cover outboard of the headlights - when correctly aligned, the tabs will snap into their slots and a mild slap with an open hand.

The one photo attached to this post shows where I drilled the 20mm hole in the washer fluid container for the Hella pump grommet. Again, I punched a guide hole with an awl before drilling to keep the 20mm drill bit from "walking". Needless to say, I siphoned out all the washer fluid before drilling.

The washer fluid container is held in place by one nut, one bolt and a plastic cone on the fluid container that slides into the steel sub-frame. I detached the washer fluid container and a friend tilted the front upward while I was drilling the hole. I could have used my 90 degree angle drill attachment but tilting the washer container up made it easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I will continue this thread "soon" after I complete the electrical wiring of the Hella kit.

Normally, per the Hella kit wiring instructions, the headlight washers should be activated when the windshield is washed and the headlights are on which is accomplished by connecting a wire from the Hella kit's relay to the positive wire on the windshield washer pump. This can't be done on the Sienna since both wires leading to the windshield washer pump are "hot" all the time - very surprising and a show-stopper for now.

Rather than figure out how to have the headlights automatically cleaned when the windshield is cleaned, I have ordered and will install a momentary push-button switch on the dashboard that will activate the headlight washer pump only when I press it. This will make the system work more like the factory installed headlight washers on our Prius.

On the Prius, the headlights are automatically cleaned only the first time the windshield is washed; subsequent cleaning of the headlights require pushing a dashboard mounted switch. The headlight cleaning system resets when the ignition switch is turned off/on. Many owners of Prius and other vehicles made by Toyota disliked this methodology due to the mess it could make on the front of a clean vehicle when all the owner wanted to do was to clean a little dust off the windshield. But instead of responding to complaints and making the headlight system completely manual via a push button switch, Toyota has eliminated the push button switch on vehicles made in the past several model years and the headlights now get washed every seventh time the windshield is washed. I haven't researched the reasoning for this change and wondered if this is a recently implemented EU requirement in regulation 48.

So ... instead of installing an on/off switch for the Hella headlight washer system, I'm going to install a Ulincos U19C3 19mm momentary switch in the same hole I've already drilled on the dashboard panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Nice write up.
Have you considered buying OEM switches so your installation looks "factory installed"?
Thanks. I absolutely would use an OEM style headlight washer and rear fog light switches if there were unused switch positions. My Sienna is a Limited with HID headlights which means that all switch openings in the dashboard are occupied. Our Prius happened to have one unused switch position/blank so I was able to use an OEM style fog light switch for its rear fog light. Thankfully, the Prius came with factory installed headlight washers with a push button activation switch.

I'm confining my additional switch installations to the small easily removable switch panel on the lower left of the dashboard on my 2014 Sienna similar to how German forum member Coasterfan installed his rear fog light and propane fuel switches on his imported gen 3 XLE.

There is not much clearance behind this little switch panel for additional switches installed in newly created openings. The small round Hella switch for my rear fog light and the similar size Ulincos switch I ordered to use with this Hella headlight washer kit are very compact and barely clear the existing OEM switches and supporting structure behind the switch panel. OEM Toyota switches often have a surprisingly large mounting depth and there is not nearly enough room to mount them in this switch panel in fabricated openings.

These projects would be more difficult if I had a 2015-up Sienna since the redesigned dashboard does not have the small easily removed switch panel that has room for adding additional, albeit small, switches.
 

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The level of detail in this post is amazing and very inspiring. I am now now hoping that it would start to snow in Florida so I can do this mod. May be I'll just do it for the heck of it except that I dont know if I want to invest so much for putting up two nozzles and a pump

Excellent post. Should go in the sticky
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The level of detail in this post is amazing and very inspiring. I am now now hoping that it would start to snow in Florida so I can do this mod. May be I'll just do it for the heck of it except that I dont know if I want to invest so much for putting up two nozzles and a pump

Excellent post. Should go in the sticky
I've heard that Florida has had quite enough snow this winter. I think the delivered cost of the Hella headlight washer kit was around US$130 after the exchange rate conversion and deduction of VAT. I wouldn't be doing this mod if I lived in Florida and didn't go on road trips to snow country in Winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
To keep this thread going while my mobility is restricted over the next few months, here are two photos.

One is of the front of my Sienna with the headlight washer nozzles installed - doesn't look much if any different than the photo of the Swiss market I posted earlier in this thread.

The other photo is of the switch panel where I mounted the Ulincos momentary switch which also shows the new location of the rear foglight switch. I'm still working on getting the momentary switch install perfect and linking its LED ring light to the rheostat control for the other dashboard lights - I will post exactly how to do it soon if I am successful.

BTW, I had to remove a small portion of the plastic dashboard frame so that the Ulincos switch would fit. The optional pigtail for the Ulincos switch was deeper than I expected.

The Hella headlight washers work great. A short press of the activation button brings forth a remarkable blast of high pressure water against the headlight lenses.

Now that I have the headlight washers working, all the snow and slush is gone and 70 degree temperatures are in the forecast.

I will post additional information on how I did the wiring/cable routing "soon".
 

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I've heard that Florida has had quite enough snow this winter. I think the delivered cost of the Hella headlight washer kit was around US$130 after the exchange rate conversion and deduction of VAT. I wouldn't be doing this mod if I lived in Florida and didn't go on road trips to snow country in Winter.
Yeah, we had some dusting up North but nothing down South other than the fact that we had a few days in the 30's.

Did you contemplate painting the nozzles in the same color as your van? Personally I like the contrast but would probably paint those on my Silver Sienna
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Did you contemplate painting the nozzles in the same color as your van? Personally I like the contrast but would probably paint those on my Silver Sienna
I don't think painting the nozzles would be a good idea. The nozzles appear to be ball-like and can be swiveled higher or lower with a specialized tool that came with the kit. I doubt that I will ever have to change the aim but hardened paint might prevent the nozzles from swiveling and/or show unpainted areas of the nozzle balls when re-positioned.

I find the "mono-color" vehicle trend amusing. I've never cared if the color of exterior mirrors, bumpers and grills matched the rest of the vehicle - I was fine with black or chrome. I don't mind that the Sienna roof rails don't match the body color. But people are different. I was surprised that my wife was originally very perturbed about my replacing the body color mirror covers on her Blizzard Pearl Prius with "painted chrome" mirror covers with turn signals from a Scion - she's gotten over it.

The friend who helped me with this Hella kit project wants to buy a new Porsche but is torn between the 911 and Cayman. We've joked about the bizarrely long option lists on Porsche vehicles and, of course, one of the extra cost options is painted headlight washer nozzles. I'm pretty sure, however, that the headlight washer nozzles on Porsche are fixed and not adjustable like the nozzles in this Hella kit which are designed to be installed on a variety of vehicle types.

There are actually single and dual nozzle Hella headlight washer kits of the pop-up type that have covers that are meant to be painted. I thought about getting one of the pop-up type kits but installation looks much more difficult and it seemed more practical to install the same kit type that the Swiss Sienna importer uses.
 
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