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I have a 200 mile daily commute and typically see about 80-100 dear on my last 20 mile stretch home every night.

My 2016 Limited has factory HID low beams and with a pair of Auxito LED bulbs for fog lights.

The factory Halogen high beams are kinda weak in comparison.

Would like to upgrade them to LED's to get a bit more reach.

What you guys are running?




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I just watched your video on changing out the wheel bearings. I'm thinking of doing mine as well. How's the eBay nsk/koyo doing? I want to order the same set.

As for headlights, I'm using beamtech 9005 , it comes on as drl but slightly flickers if you look at it indirectly. High beam is brighter than halogen bulbs.

You could always covert HIR1 (9011) to 9005. Plenty of info online but for example here's one. HOW TO: H11 to H9 / 9005 to 9011 Headlight Conversion

I've used this and it's bright. I also gave converted osram h9 to h11. So both are halogen. This combo is very bright.

Right now I'm running just LEDs though.
 

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Probably not road legal and blinds other drivers?
I can confirm that changing halogen bulbs to LED is not allowed by the Federal regulations (but MANY of us have done it anyway), and high beams blinding other drivers is a simple matter of COURTESY. Even when properly aimed, high beams should not be engaged when oncoming traffic is within a certain distance. Most regulations that I have seen state that distance as 500 feet.

Now, LOW beams are another matter. Still illegal to replace halogens with LEDs, but aiming is CRITICAL, since low beams will be on all the time at night.

By the way, the legality issue is only for putting LEDs into housings that are designed around halogen bulbs. If you were to find an aftermarket supplier that designed a complete new housing around an LED emitter (and were DOT approved), there would be no problem installing them. The main reason for the LED ban is that, until recently, LEDs were too large to properly replicate the size and position of the halogen filament. With the light source in a different location, the light would be projected by the reflector and lens to unwanted locations. Some of the newer (and very expensive) LEDs have very small emitters that are pretty darn close to the location of the halogen filament, so the pattern they put onto the road is pretty close to stock.

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OK. Show me a legal LED upgrade that passes Federal law.
Again, its illegal no matter how you try to massage it. Aiming would not be an issue, but you know as well as I do that less than 0.001% even think to aim anything nowadays and it's still too damn bright.
 

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I have not seen anything legal for a Sienna (yet), but there are systems for other vehicles.

As stated before, it has to be a complete reflector/lens/housing that is designed around an LED source that is then approved by DOT. One such device is the TruckLite 27270c (<--click link) that is popular with the Jeep community. I have a couple of these in my motorcycles, but motorcycles are exempt from the ban on LED conversions. These lights are legal in bikes or cars, but won't work on any Sienna that was ever made.

By the way, the LEDs that I installed in my Sienna HAVE been properly aimed.

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I have pet peeves about lots of DIY lighting I see on cars, mostly because it wasn't designed for on-road use or some did something like put one of those old style LED conversions into a halogen reflector, or upgraded fog lights to be brighter or the wrong bulbs or not road-approved lighting, or other stuff like light bars or aftermarket lights that aren't road approved (and aimed, but you can't aim a floodlight, hence the road approved).

I couldn't care less what you do to your high beams though, as long as you turn them off at an appropriate distance. Only thing that matters is lights that will on when you pass me because they can't be turned off.

I have a motorcycle that had halogens in reflector housings, one for low beam, one for high beam (not dual fillament bulbs in both). I put a 55 W HID into the high beam headlight projector. WOW could you see going down a straight road at night! Obviously I always shut it off like any high beam when approaching other traffic. Only problem was switching the HID on and off isn't good for them, and will quickly wear it out, which it did. Always wanted to rebuild the headlights with actual HID reflectors with the high/low shutter that HID headlights often use and a pair of 35 W HID bulbs because the stock low beam is absolutely terrible.

Having said that, I'm actually surprised that a Sienna with factory HIDs would only have HID low beams instead of using them for both high and low beams with the shutter to block light to switch from high to low beam. My understanding is that's the typical way HIDs are implemented. Wonder why Toyota didn't go that route on the Sienna.
 

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I think the main point is that your high beams could be brighter than a thousand suns like a Ford F150’s that it is just a matter of courtesy as to whether you blind other people or not. Nobody cares as to whether it’s legal or not. Cops certainly don’t either.
That said I put some “Sealight” branded LED bulbs off Amazon on both my cars and really like the color and the brightness. For an affordable bulb I really recommend them.
 

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I will point out that the OP is talking about upgrading his high beams, and leaving the factory low beam headlights alone. As mentioned, I'm totally of the opinion that if you want to modify your high beams go nuts, so long as you are good about turning them off. I do think the low beams should not be touched from OEM (LED retrofits, etc) unless you are willing to get proper road-legal headlight units, not bulbs, and do a proper aiming job on them.

If you think DIY car headlights are bad though, my coworker tells me his bicycle commute on the bike path in the dark is terrible, as so many bicycle headlights sold in the US have round beams and exposed light sources like a flashlight, and that coupled with really bad aiming and a busy bike path makes it highly annoying. When adding a headlight to my bicycle, I specifically looked for a headlight with proper non-glaring functions. This headlight was made in Germany (German bicycle lighting rules require certain non-glare attributes), so the headlight has a vertically oriented LED that points down, with a reflector that shapes the beam and a hard vertical light cutoff. This is exactly the same sort of design the OEM LED lights on my Silverado had. Most or all of the OEM LED headlights I've seen do this the same way. I believe in addition to keeping the LED hidden from direct view as you need to do, the top-down mount allows easy headsinking of the LED.

If you look at OEM car headlights, the source of the light is always hidden, whether that is a shield over the bulb or simply a halogen bulb with silvering at the top to hide direct line of sight to the bulb itself, as that is uncollimated light that is pure glare. By blocking this, the reflector shapes the bulb to avoid glare to oncoming traffic. By way of comparison, OEM high beams are often exposed bulbs, as there's no need to shield the glare from the bulb. So for high beams, go nuts. Whatever floats your boat. Just be sure to turn it off, modified or not, when approaching oncoming traffic. :)

For reference on the OEM that I was talking about, here is the 2014 Halogen OEM lights. The low beams are projectors, so they have mirrors and lenses to shape the light. But note the low beam bulb is coated at the top to block the direct line-of-site to the bulb. On the other hand, the high beam has no such coating on the bulb. Just an uncoated bulb.
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Again. If you make such a statement you need to give a reason. Everyone’s entitled to their opinion but just saying don’t do it doesn’t help anyone.

A high beam LED is only blinding people if you are a an a**hole. What is your reasoning behind advising against it?
Fair enough.
I suppose my main gripe is with the twits who believe Anything LED Is Better, install them in their low beams, then create a hazard to all oncoming traffic. I can’t tell you how much I hate encountering these drivers.
As for high beams, my attitude is much softer, mess around to your heart’s contententment, I suppose. But in those instances I don’t believe LED is gaining much useful visibility, mostly just a spray of bright.

I encourage anybody considering lighting upgrades to spend a little time over at the candlepower forums automotive section, it’s moderated by experts in the field, including engineers who design headlights.
Heres’s a distillation of what I’ve learned there over the years:
  • Brighter doesn’t mean better, putting light where you need it is better
  • Most aftermarket solutions are snake oil rubbish
  • If a light was designed for incandescent bulbs, best to stick with that. LEDs can’t [yet?] mimic the pinpoint filament position necessary for effective patterning
  • There’s usually improvements that can be made economically with careful, specific bulb choice.
  • Dramatic improvements will be expensive and/or illegal for a reason.

FWIW, I live in Alaska and drive more & faster than the average person. My area is very wet, dark, and filled with wildlife, so I take lighting seriously. Guys I know experiment with all sorts LED and HID conversions, so far all of them have just reinforced my opinion.
For our Gen3 vans I’d recommend a Philips H11XV bulb or converted H9 bulb for low beam and converted 9011 bulb for high beam. Substantial improvement and still technically bona-fine DOT— I’ve been pleased enough with this setup that the Hella 4000 “moose lights” I bought last year are still sitting in their boxes.
 

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Fair enough.
I suppose my main gripe is with the twits who believe Anything LED Is Better, install them in their low beams, then create a hazard to all oncoming traffic. I can’t tell you how much I hate these drivers.
As for high beams, my attitude is much softer, mess around to your heart’s contententment, I suppose. But in those instances I don’t believe LED is gaining much useful, mostly just a spray of bright.

I encourage anybody considering lighting upgrades to spend a little time over at the candlepower forums automotive section, it’s moderated by experts in the field, including engineers who design headlights.
Heres’s a distillation of what I’ve learned there over the years:
  • Brighter doesn’t mean better, putting light where you need it is better
  • Most aftermarket solutions are snake oil rubbish
  • If a light was designed for incandescent bulbs, best to stick with that. LEDs can’t mimic the precise filament position necessary for effective patterning
  • There’s usually improvements that can be made economically with careful, specific bulb choice.
  • Dramatic improvements will be expensive and/or illegal.

FWIW, I live in Alaska and drive more & faster than the average person. My area is very wet, dark, and filled with wildlife, So I take lighting seriously. Guys I know experiment with all sorts LED and HID conversions, so far all of them have just reinforced my opinion.
For our Gen3 vans I’d recommend a Philips H11XV bulb or H9 conversion bulb for low beam and 9005 converted bulb for high beam. Substantial improvement and still DOT legal— I’ve been pleased enough that the Hella 4000 “moose lights” I bought last year are still sitting in the boxes.
Thank you for the lengthy explanation. I personally switched to LEDs and having projectors for low beams I see no change in the beam pattern nor any blinding when standing in front of the van. The cutoff is still extremely sharp and I can post pictures to prove it. I drive my fair share of unlit highways at night here in the northeast and I can tell you the LEDs made a huge improvement in how much I can see. But everyone is entitled to their opinion.

I do also know people that have made the switch, especially with older cars and all they do is scatter light everywhere. I definitely think that is a bad idea and totally agree with you then.

What you are recommending though, with a conversion to something like an H9 bulb, which I am guilty of doing myself and I can attest to how great it works, to me though, is akin to recommending LEDs. Some people might be of the opinion that while it’s a DOT bulb you are still increasing current draw, light output, heat output and modifying something to fit into something it was not designed for.

I am not at all saying you are wrong and your observations are perfectly valid but the engineer that designed your housing might still have an issue with your recommendations, halogen vs led argument aside.

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What's worse than LED headlights? F350 with all their 6 lights on and it's slanted! or a idiot tesla driver who puts on low/high beams on. now that's bright.

Honestly, most of the new cars now with LED are pretty damn bright.
 

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I will point out that the OP is talking about upgrading his high beams, and leaving the factory low beam headlights alone. As mentioned, I'm totally of the opinion that if you want to modify your high beams go nuts, so long as you are good about turning them off. I do think the low beams should not be touched from OEM (LED retrofits, etc) unless you are willing to get proper road-legal headlight units, not bulbs, and do a proper aiming job on them.

If you think DIY car headlights are bad though, my coworker tells me his bicycle commute on the bike path in the dark is terrible, as so many bicycle headlights sold in the US have round beams and exposed light sources like a flashlight, and that coupled with really bad aiming and a busy bike path makes it highly annoying. When adding a headlight to my bicycle, I specifically looked for a headlight with proper non-glaring functions. This headlight was made in Germany (German bicycle lighting rules require certain non-glare attributes), so the headlight has a vertically oriented LED that points down, with a reflector that shapes the beam and a hard vertical light cutoff. This is exactly the same sort of design the OEM LED lights on my Silverado had. Most or all of the OEM LED headlights I've seen do this the same way. I believe in addition to keeping the LED hidden from direct view as you need to do, the top-down mount allows easy headsinking of the LED.

If you look at OEM car headlights, the source of the light is always hidden, whether that is a shield over the bulb or simply a halogen bulb with silvering at the top to hide direct line of sight to the bulb itself, as that is uncollimated light that is pure glare. By blocking this, the reflector shapes the bulb to avoid glare to oncoming traffic. By way of comparison, OEM high beams are often exposed bulbs, as there's no need to shield the glare from the bulb. So for high beams, go nuts. Whatever floats your boat. Just be sure to turn it off, modified or not, when approaching oncoming traffic. :)

For reference on the OEM that I was talking about, here is the 2014 Halogen OEM lights. The low beams are projectors, so they have mirrors and lenses to shape the light. But note the low beam bulb is coated at the top to block the direct line-of-site to the bulb. On the other hand, the high beam has no such coating on the bulb. Just an uncoated bulb.
View attachment 59189
Most LEDs don’t project the light forward either. The ones I got have the LEDs on the sides and create the same effect you describe

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Most LEDs don’t project the light forward either. The ones I got have the LEDs on the sides and create the same effect you describe

View attachment 59227
You need to get the right LED bulb. I had the Sealight X2 for about a 1-2 yrs. The beam was scattered although it had a descent light output. Just upgraded my high beam LED bulb to the newer Sealight X4. I can describe it in one word. WICKED! The reason why most of the LED bulbs don't perform well and don't throw it far out front is because once installed, the LED's are not in the 3 and 9 o'clock position and partly not bright too. The Sealight X4 has the adjustable ring and is twice as bright as the X2. The X4 can be adjusted to where you can position the LED's at the 3 and 9 o'clock position. The X4 comes with the tiny allen wrench so you can position the LED's properly. If you do a research on youtube, the best performance you get with LED bulbs is when the LED's are in the 3 and 9 o'clock position. I just bought the Sealight X4 last Saturday because it was on sale at Amazon from $119 to $79 minus $20 coupon and ended up at $59 plus tax. I cannot tell about the longevity of it since I just got it. But based on my purchase of the X2 that lasted until now, it may be okay. The X4 throws a lot of light out front. I will post a picture soon. Already took pictures with my cellphone.
 

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The top photo is low beam and bottom photo is high beam. Take note that I have bi xenon projectors so it may not perform like the OP because I have 2 high beams but I can tell you guys that the Sealight X4 is the real deal. If you look closely at the high beam photo, the light is very concentrated in the center and not scattered like the Sealight X2 that I previouly had and I know the difference very well since I used it for close to 2 years. @98 SNAKE EATER, I would highly recommend it. The Sealight has a fan but does not interfere with electronics. I WILL NOT recommend upgrading this bulb if you use it as your DRL too due to possible longevity issues.
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Fair enough.
I suppose my main gripe is with the twits who believe Anything LED Is Better, install them in their low beams, then create a hazard to all oncoming traffic. I can’t tell you how much I hate these drivers.
As for high beams, my attitude is much softer, mess around to your heart’s contententment, I suppose. But in those instances I don’t believe LED is gaining much useful, mostly just a spray of bright.

I encourage anybody considering lighting upgrades to spend a little time over at the candlepower forums automotive section, it’s moderated by experts in the field, including engineers who design headlights.
Heres’s a distillation of what I’ve learned there over the years:
  • Brighter doesn’t mean better, putting light where you need it is better
  • Most aftermarket solutions are snake oil rubbish
  • If a light was designed for incandescent bulbs, best to stick with that. LEDs can’t mimic the precise filament position necessary for effective patterning
  • There’s usually improvements that can be made economically with careful, specific bulb choice.
  • Dramatic improvements will be expensive and/or illegal.

FWIW, I live in Alaska and drive more & faster than the average person. My area is very wet, dark, and filled with wildlife, So I take lighting seriously. Guys I know experiment with all sorts LED and HID conversions, so far all of them have just reinforced my opinion.
For our Gen3 vans I’d recommend a Philips H11XV bulb or H9 conversion bulb for low beam and 9005 converted bulb for high beam. Substantial improvement and still DOT legal— I’ve been pleased enough that the Hella 4000 “moose lights” I bought last year are still sitting in the boxes.
The problem why you can't get optimal output and focus on the beam in halogen projectors retrofitted with an LED bulb is because the LED bulbs are not in the 3 and 9 o'clock position. The other challenge is that in a projector housing, it is difficult to see the LED's inside if they are at the 3 and 9 o'clock position. Even with the adjustable rings, you can turn it for trial an error to find optimal performance but very difficult to lock it into place in relation to the 3 notches that locks the bulb in place. If you look closely at the 9005 or H11 bulb placement in the driver and passenger headlights, the orientation of the bulbs are different from one another. Meaning, the angle of the connectors are not in the same position in the driver and passenger headlights. With halogen bulbs, it don't matter because the light is distributed in 360 degrees. With LED bulbs, the difference is substantial.
 
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