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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2005 Sienna LE (best care we have ever owned, until recently since she is getting older at 150K miles.

I kind of suck at electrical. There, I said it, although I do feel like less of a man now. Looked at the wring diagrams, took off the drivers side main switch, passenger side switch and door panel. Here is what I have:
  1. Son comes how and say passenger side front power window won't go up, using driver's side switch or passenger side switch.
  2. All other windows and locks work.
  3. No blown fuses.
  4. No compromised wires in door channels
  5. Getting power to blue wire at passenger side switch
  6. Tried the power window reset procedure, nothing.
  7. If I connect jumper cables from battery to window motor the window will work. So not motor.
  8. I tried the bypass switch but that didn't seem to work
  9. Investigate drivers side switch. Discover the common broken switch tab (see picture below, Driver's side switch A)
  10. Took off the drivers side switch cover. Moving the little white switches manually operates other windows.(see picture Switch "B") For the problematic passenger side front window, moving the switch makes a noise, started window up a few inches then stopped, can start it back down and stop. Seemed like it was sensitive to battery power.
Interestingly, since I had the key to ON position for a while doing all this testing battery may have been a little low. Put a charger on it and I could get more reliable up and down using the white switches. Only the problematic drivers side switch seemed sensitive to battery power.

I couldn't get the passenger side switch to operate in any way. And Im not sure how to test that switch with a multimeter. Trying the multimeter I THINK it might have a continuity issue in the up position. But if driver's side is likely do to the broken tab that moves the white switch, what are the odds the tab broke AND the passenger side switch developed an issue at same time?

Anyway, appreciate any info. I did try and read up on it on my own :unsure:

Gadget Bumper Automotive exterior Audio equipment Machine

Passive circuit component Circuit component Electronic engineering Electronic component Microcontroller
 

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So, you MIGHT have two problems... One is minor and the other is the ACTUAL problem. It sounds like you might need to grease up the tracks and actuator. As your battery gets a little low, your window might move slightly slower. However, that difference should be slight unless you need a bit of grease.

Your second issue (window stuck) might be switch related, but typically, I would expect that you would get intermittent ups, intermittent downs or both or just no functionality at all. Getting the window up should be easy. If the motor runs, apply power to one wire and ground to another and the motor will go up. Reverse the polarity and it will go down. There shouldn't be any more complexity to it than that. The complexity comes in through the fact that instead of using a simple relay pack, cars wire the control logic into the main ECU panel. You should be able to test the switch by removing it from the wiring block. Figure which pin is the ground. Stick the ground of your multimeter in that one. Stick the positive probe into each other pin with the meter on continuity and activate the switch up and/or down and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So, you MIGHT have two problems... One is minor and the other is the ACTUAL problem. It sounds like you might need to grease up the tracks and actuator. As your battery gets a little low, your window might move slightly slower. However, that difference should be slight unless you need a bit of grease.

Your second issue (window stuck) might be switch related, but typically, I would expect that you would get intermittent ups, intermittent downs or both or just no functionality at all. Getting the window up should be easy. If the motor runs, apply power to one wire and ground to another and the motor will go up. Reverse the polarity and it will go down. There shouldn't be any more complexity to it than that. The complexity comes in through the fact that instead of using a simple relay pack, cars wire the control logic into the main ECU panel. You should be able to test the switch by removing it from the wiring block. Figure which pin is the ground. Stick the ground of your multimeter in that one. Stick the positive probe into each other pin with the meter on continuity and activate the switch up and/or down and see what happens.
I may have added these pictures above after your reply. Pretty sure its that damned broken tab. And of course you cant easily just get that piece.
 
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