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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys. I got a new 2005 xle fwd and after sorting through 7 engine codes she is running beastmode😎. 202k. I took care of emissions crap and o2 was fixed.

I've had 4 odyssey in a row so just bought this on a whim looking for another odyssey. I need some inspiration fellas lol. I feel the need to lower this but know very little about this platform. I've seen venza wheels and liked those 20s. Here are some of my odysseys... lets see cool 2nd generation 😎 I'll prob do some exhaust work and that 3rd cat is going bye bye. I like loud machinery lol

I did led interior lights...big difference. What are some good headlight bulbs? I need to buff fogs and do those bulbs too. She needs some love but has potential maybe 😆 I'm reading about guys running honda wheels with 5x120 adapters. 🤷‍♂️ please school me sienna camp

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A lot of people seem to opt for just bumping up from stock 16" steel wheels to 17" alloy rims from a Highlander. It doesn't lower the van, but it fills out the wheel wells and keeps it stock-looking without the need for any spacers, suspension or speedometer alterations. I've read plenty of accounts of people making the switch to LED headlights, only to switch back or express regret. There just really isn't a good conversion available. Most common complaints are that it produces more glare, even though the lights are brighter. Restoring/polishing the headlight lenses returns them to their factory original clear condition and drastically improves their performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A lot of people seem to opt for just bumping up from stock 16" steel wheels to 17" alloy rims from a Highlander. It doesn't lower the van, but it fills out the wheel wells and keeps it stock-looking without the need for any spacers, suspension or speedometer alterations. I've read plenty of accounts of people making the switch to LED headlights, only to switch back or express regret. There just really isn't a good conversion available. Most common complaints are that it produces more glare, even though the lights are brighter. Restoring/polishing the headlight lenses returns them to their factory original clear condition and drastically improves their performance.
Thanks. Yes I've been looking at highlander wheels too. I don't have to lower it but it's an idea lol 😆. I'm looking at mustang wheels too. They are cheap as hell compared to lex/yota wheels it seems.

I have been polishing lights and they are looking much better. A few more rounds and they should look great.
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You do you, as they say. Personally, I like to keep my car on-brand, visibly. Aftermarket is aftermarket, but Mustang is an iconic brand. I will also add, that, depending on your configuration, you might have heavily rusty rear drums (some have 4-wheel disc brakes; others are drums in the rear) and in any case, the calipers/brackets are just plain metal, so it's not like they are anything special to look at through those huge open rims. So this might involve getting new front and rear brakes with coated drums (if equipped) and rotors and painting the calipers/brackets. However, if you're after reduction of unsprung weight to improve handling and overall weight to reduce fuel usage, getting minimalist rims like that could be a good way to go. Actually, if you are so inclined, you could probably get/make some custom Toyota emblems to install in place of those horses.
 

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They fit in the rear, the front is the problem.... they sit on bump stops, ride is subjective! They fit and do well.... doing more research into it as I'd really like to go air. However I'm just testing stuff to help people out that want to lower their van's. There's a missing piece of the suspension puzzle that I'd like to make so people could really dial everything in
 

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2004 Sienna CE 113k mi (Oct 2022)
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Have you driven the Sienna much yet? Last thing I'd want to mess with is the suspension. Siennas are more about how they feel than look. No worries about changing wheels etc, I've got 17's off a Suzuki Grand Vitara on mine, which btw are a perfect fit including the centre bore. But before you go bigger than 17" you should know that there is virtually no used tire market beyond 17", and lower profile tires will wear out the control arm bushings faster. A sad part about the gen 2 Sienna suspension is that replacing the control arm bushings requires removing the control arms, 2.5 hours a side at best. I used to swap out my Montana's bushings every couple years because they took under an hour to do both.

If you ever do replace them upgrade to PVC bushings. They're only about $50 and so worth it. I did mine and it has zero play in the front end apart from tire wall, and they don't wear without serious abuse. Got my first BMW owner to ride in it and he agreed it drives like he would expect a BMW minivan to drive. Not bad for 18 yrs old :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Have you driven the Sienna much yet? Last thing I'd want to mess with is the suspension. Siennas are more about how they feel than look. No worries about changing wheels etc, I've got 17's off a Suzuki Grand Vitara on mine, which btw are a perfect fit including the centre bore. But before you go bigger than 17" you should know that there is virtually no used tire market beyond 17", and lower profile tires will wear out the control arm bushings faster. A sad part about the gen 2 Sienna suspension is that replacing the control arm bushings requires removing the control arms, 2.5 hours a side at best. I used to swap out my Montana's bushings every couple years because they took under an hour to do both.

If you ever do replace them upgrade to PVC bushings. They're only about $50 and so worth it. I did mine and it has zero play in the front end apart from tire wall, and they don't wear without serious abuse. Got my first BMW owner to ride in it and he agreed it drives like he would expect a BMW minivan to drive. Not bad for 18 yrs old :)
Great info. I haven't fooled around with suspension and after reading this, I think I'll stick to stock lol. I do need some wheels so thanks for the suzuki tip. Mustang wheels seem to be common and cheap. I'd rather not run rings if I can avoid it. I wish highlander wheels were not so expensive too. They're nice
 

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Mustang wheels are the matching 5x114.3 bolt pattern, but have a 70.5mm centre bore, the inner circle of the rim. Your 05 Sienna has a 60.1mm centre bore on the hub. They'll fit on, but the weight of your van will be resting on the bolts instead of the hub. It takes a pretty serious set of circumstances where that becomes a factor, like hitting the median hard enough to crack a few bolts then needing to brake hard, but hub rings to fill that gap are only like $20 a set on Amazon. Just get a set with 70.5mm OD and 60.1mm ID. They're made to tap snugly into the rim and slide off the hub, so once they're on the rims you'll never have to think about it again. $20 is a pittance to prevent a disaster from compounding itself. If you crack 3 bolts then put the brakes to the floor, that wheel is coming off if there's a centre bore gap.

Also check to see if the Mustang rims are too wide. Wheel-size.com is a rather comprehensive resource. When buying any used rims, check to see how much balancing weight is on them. When people try to unload bent rims, they usually either leave the weights as is or remove them entirely. Never buy used rims where any one of them has more than 5oz of counterweight or none at all. Look also for evidence of recently removed weights.

I got bit once, but my mechanic managed to used to unbalanced weight of the tire and 6oz of weight to balance a bent rim. He strongly advised me never to put that wheel on the front...
 
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