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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here are photos of the rear fog light I installed on our 2014 Sienna. I've had rear fog lights on mainly European vehicles but never thought much about the lack of one on the Sienna until last month when another white Sienna passed us on a road trip and instantly disappeared into the heavy fog - he was driving way too fast for the conditions.


The rear fog light is the "Klare LED-NSL/Nebelschlussleuchte" from seller "lightsforbikes" on eBay Germany. The unit has an "E-mark" - E4/Netherlands.


I am using an amber Hella switch but have not yet permanently installed it to the right of the headlight beam lever control switch. I had hoped to install the switch on the left side per the photo but there is no clearance behind the switch panel.


I am very grateful to forum member Coasterfan for suggesting this light unit and providing tips on installing it. The unit has a very low profile and will be barely noticeable except when in use in extreme fog and blizzard conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here is a photo of the hole to the right of the beam level control switch that I created for the amber Hella switch and a photo of the switch installed.

The switch panel popped out very easily by prying it out with a plastic trim removal tool inserted in the seam on the left side of the panel. I unplugged the connectors from the OEM switches so that I could take the switch panel to my workbench.


It was necessary to remove small ridges in the back side of the switch panel so that the Hella switch retainer nut could fit flush with the back surface of the panel. I used a utility knife to remove most of the ridges and a half round bastard file to smooth the rear panel surface.

I then used the switch retainer nut as a template to mark on the back side of the switch panel the outline of the hole I needed to create . It is a tight fit between the beam level switch and the panel clip that holds the panel to the dashboard so I had to be very precise.


Once I had the outline of the hole marked on the back side of the switch panel, I drilled several adjacent small holes inside the marked circle and then used the half round bastard file to enlarge the drilled holes - test fitting the switch along the way - until the hole was exactly the right size.


The installed Hella switch looks great and could pass for OEM. I thought about aligning the top of the Hella switch surround with the top of the adjacent beam level control switch but decided to play it safe since positioning the switch "centered" ensured adequate clearance behind the switch.


Again, thank you to forum member Coasterfan for his advice.


Next step is the permanently install the wires and relay. I'm taking this one step at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I won't go into detail or provide photos of running the ground wire from the rear fog light to the same bolt behind the interior trim panel below left taillight to which the ground wire for my trailer light harness is attached. The panel is easy to pull open enough to use a wrench to secure the ground wire.

And it was very easy to run the positive wire for the rear fog light forward from the rear and to tuck it under the side panels where they meet the carpet. Both side door thresholds pop out easily and the positive rear fog light wire was zip tied to other wires.


Here are three photos.


1) Pushing a coat hanger wire through the large grommet above the gas pedal. I attached the red power wire to the coat hanger wire in the interior and pulled the wire into the engine compartment. This has to be the easiest vehicle I've owned to get wires through the firewall.


2) 7.5 amp in-line fuse. Just for added safety since the LED rear fog light's current draw is extraordinarily low and the front fog lights are already fused.


3) T-tap of the red power wire into the left front fog light positive (red stripe) wire near the connector for the left front fog light bulb. I've used this crude way before when installing a rear fog light. I could have found a power wire under the dash but this method should be easy for a future owner of the van to understand.


Tapping into the front fog light power causes the rear fog light to function only when the front fog lights are on - same as the rear fog lights on European cars I've owned.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The last three photos I will post in this thread ...

1) The Hella switch with the power (red), function (yellow) and ground (black) wires connected to it.


Power - from the left front fog light through the firewall.
Function - attached to the yellow positive wire on the rear fog light.
Ground - attached to a common ground wire bolt behind the left kick panel.

2) A view from the driver seat of the rear fog light switch in the Off (unlighted) position.


3) A view from the driver seat of the rear fog light switch in the On (lighted) position.


I had planned to use a relay or two in this project but the capacity of the Hella switch (20 amp) and the low current draw of the LED rear fog light made this unnecessary.


I was surprised at how easy it was to remove the front underbody panel to get to the front fog light cables and connectors ... and how uncluttered the engine compartment and the space under the driver side dashboard are.


The last task in this project was to adjust the aim of the rear fog light by loosening its bracket and using a yardstick pressed against its face to ensure that it was aimed exactly rearward so that it will be most effective.


One more thing. The way I wired the rear fog light does not meet requirements effective June 2013 in the U.K. and perhaps in other countries in which rear fog lights are required. Rear fog lights are now required to switch off and stay off when the front head lights are switched off and to stay off when the headlights are turned back on unless the driver manually turns the rear fog light switch to the Off position and back to the On position. This requirement can be address by including a latching relay in the rear fog light circuit or by installing a module like one from Cartek U.K.: https://www.merlinmotorsport.co.uk/p/cartek-iva-compliant-fog-light-switch-control-unit-cd-es-fc2
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Awsome write up Geezer. might do this to help visibility while backing up the van.

Thanks.


The same company on eBay Germany I bought the rear fog light from also sells an identical looking version that emits white light which would be more suitable for a backup light. The challenge would be to connect it to the reverse light circuit for it to light up automatically when the transmission is in reverse. The seems to be an issue based on threads I've seen where people attempted to connect trailer surge brakes to the Sienna backup light circuit.


Here is a photo of the 1 1/4" x 1 1/4" steel L-bracket material I bought at a hardware store and cut to size. I primed it and then painted it black. The holes in the bracket are perfectly spaced for the cable coming out the back of the rear fog light and for the screws holding the fog light to the bracket.

I installed the top surface of the bracket above the horizontal bottom surface of the bumper cover to hide it and used the bracket as a template to drill the holes in the bumper cover. Using relatively small diameter screw bolts and large washers provides a fairly wide range of adjustability from right to left so that the fog light beam could be directed precisely rearward.


Since the Sienna's bumper is curved, it is necessary to allow for the curve when drilling the holes - otherwise the rear fog light's beam would be angled to the left.


I also left out that I pulled the wires for the rear fog light into the trunk through a grommet under the carpet - same grommet through which I ran the power wire for the trailer light harness.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Hey, @Geezer1 ...how's the light holding up?
Holding up? I installed the same rear fog light model on our Prius v wagon and Sienna and they both still work fine - I check them about once a month when I check the operation of all the other lights.

I haven't used the rear fog on the Sienna a single time in 2016 although I came close to turning it on a few weeks ago when I ascended into a cloud on an elevated roadway. That's a good thing - I regard rear fog lights as near-emergency devices that are rarely used. We've done an unusually few number of "road trips" this year and have not had to drive through a particularly soggy area a single time.


Rear fog lights should be used only if you have difficulty seeing vehicles in front of you and they should be turned off when it is obvious that drivers of vehicles behind you can see your vehicle. If only someone would explain that to Jaguar and Range Rover owners!

Edit: Here's a photo of the same rear fog light model on our Prius v.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
This post is about a rather trivial change where I replaced the amber Hella switch with a black Hella switch with a small green diode due to the amber switch with its far brighter LED getting very hot - a common complaint in Amazon.com reviews. Perhaps the heat wouldn't have caused problems but I was uncomfortable with it. The "correct" tell tale light color for a rear fog light indicator is amber but green will do. I may replace the green LED Hella switch with a similar red LED Hella switch and use the green LED switch for future project.

Which brings up a discovery ...

When replacing the fog light switch I noticed that there is plenty of clearance for these Hella switches in the lower part of the switch panel. The attached image shows the switch panel with the new green diode switch, the switch panel with the old amber switch, and the image marked where I found that there is room for additional Hella switches. Disregard the blue-ish tint of the lower portion of the image ... don't know why that happened.

Edit: Added a photo showing how the rear fog light switch was repositioned after the installation of headlight washers.
 

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very cool mod! thanks for posting. some immediate wish list things i thought of for this are:

- integrate light into one of the rear bumper reflectors
- integrate control into front fog light switch
 

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Discussion Starter #12
very cool mod! thanks for posting. some immediate wish list things i thought of for this are:

- integrate light into one of the rear bumper reflectors

I would have preferred to have done that if I could have found a rear fog light that would fit there, which also had a built in reflex reflector and which had the certification "E-mark" that confirmed that it met the stringent requirements for a rear fog light stated in ECU regulation 38. The LED lights some people install in the rear bumper of their Sienna do not come anywhere close to functioning as rear fog lights and, as Sienna Chat forum member coasterfan found out, do not meet the reflex reflector requirement. He had to add stick-on reflectors to pass an inspection.



- integrate control into front fog light switch

I would have preferred to have done it that way but I would have had to have found a Toyota turn signal stalk - perhaps from some European market Toyota - that has the additional fog light switch position, which would fit the Sienna and which would be compatible with the U.S. market Sienna lighting system.



Even if I could have found such a stalk, it likely would have cost several hundred dollars and I would have also had to install a separate rear fog light indicator light in the dashboard. The inexpensive dash mounted switch I used has a built-in indicator light and it was easy to install in the dashboard panel.


I'm absolutely a "function over form" guy. This modification was done for safety. I tried to make it look good but it would not have mattered if I was not able to.
 

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Well I think the form looks great! We don't get dangerous fog out here in California (save for in the central valley) so I'm thinking of doing these wired to the fog stock fog light switch in the stalk... we'll see. Might end up just being wired to running lights.


I'm not familiar with the UN code governing fog lamps... but I'm reading it now! :p
 

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Discussion Starter #14
We don't get dangerous fog out here in California (save for in the central valley) so I'm thinking of doing these wired to the fog stock fog light switch in the stalk... we'll see. Might end up just being wired to running lights.
I'm guessing you don't get out of San Jose much, drive up to San Francisco or on the coastal highway. :surprise:

Sorry but I'm not a fan of those cheap Amazon/eBay rear bumper lights. If you buy them, make sure they have reflective capabilities to protect your Sienna if you ever parallel park on dark streets.
 

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The switch panel popped out very easily by prying it out with a plastic trim removal tool inserted in the seam on the left side of the panel. I unplugged the connectors from the OEM switches so that I could take the switch panel to my workbench.
Thank you for the write up! Do I understand correctly, then, that pulling the switch panel is possible without removing the rest of the instrument panel trim, or does the lower panel below it have to come out first?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you for the write up! Do I understand correctly, then, that pulling the switch panel is possible without removing the rest of the instrument panel trim, or does the lower panel below it have to come out first?
Correct. Nothing else has to be removed when installing switches in the little panel or when running wires to switches you install in it. I tucked some of the wires I ran behind the under-dash fuse box but had to do a redo after the sliding door recall due to the tech leaving my additional wires unsecured when he installed the new fuse box.
 

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Correct. Nothing else has to be removed when installing switches in the little panel or when running wires to switches you install in it. I tucked some of the wires I ran behind the under-dash fuse box but had to do a redo after the sliding door recall due to the tech leaving my additional wires unsecured when he installed the new fuse box.
Thanks! That makes this process genuinely handy. Did the tech at least mention that he had left the wires loose?
I could see him not hooking them up, either being unsure of where they went or just going by the book and not wanting the liability, but it might be worth suggesting to him that leaving bits dangling without warning could be a great opportunity for fire or electrical damage...
 

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Geezer1, can you take a picture of the foglight on at night with the parking lights and another picture with the brake lights activated? Just want to see how bright it is. Love the foglight install BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Geezer1, can you take a picture of the foglight on at night with the parking lights and another picture with the brake lights activated? Just want to see how bright it is. Love the foglight install BTW.
I don't think photos of the rear fog lights on our vehicles in clear weather would be meaningful. An attribute of a compliant rear fog light is that its beam is focused and its light output looks much larger in fog, heavy rain or blowing snow whether it's day or night - magnified by the water droplets in the air making it look like a large ball of fire.

There is a YouTube video that shows what I mean:
 

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What I wanted to see is if the fog light you installed has the same intensity as the brake lights and is much brighter than the parking lights. I like the fact that the foglight you installed is smaller and tucked nicely under the rear bumper. I have used the hella rear foglight before that uses a 20W halogen bulb which is equivalent to the wattage of the brake lights. Just wanted to see the picture for comparison. No need for foul weather pictures.
 
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