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I'm seriously considering buying a Sienna and have been doing a little brainstorming. I've seen several discussions regarding removing the trolleys from the tracks. Has anyone reversed the trolleys so the seats would face backwards?

My thought is with the 2nd row seat(s) reversed and slid all the way forward (or backward in this case), there might be enough space to put a small table between the 2nd and 3rd row seats.
Continuing with that thought, the 3rd row seats could later be folded and stored, the table dropped down and the rest of the space behind the 2nd rows seats be converted into a sleeping area.
Part of the driver for this line of thought is so that the van can be slept in but still carry more than two people.

Another question would be how much space would remain from the seat the back of the van? I'm short so it might work.
 

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I used Sienna for camping for two people. So I'm not the one who wishes you to fail.
I don't think that you will know how it will work out until you buy your van and start customising it. Or you can pay van converters and they will do it for you. I don't know any but Mr. Google is there to help.
 

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Seat belts would be in the wrong location if you reversed the middle seats.
They would be unless he bought a Sienna trim version like I have in which the 2nd row seat belts are entirely contained in the seats.

Several people have asked about reversing the 2nd row seats but no one has documented doing it. It would be practical only on 7-passenger Sienna that have 2nd row captain chairs since the seat tracks on 8-passenger versions are not uniformly spaced.

A problem you get in vehicles with rearward facing second row seats is that you have the 1st row and 2nd row seats reclining against each other with occupants having to keep the seat backs upright instead of reclining. That's a problem on the Toyota ProAce Executive van sold in Europe which also has the "feature" of 2nd row and 3rd row occupants having to share the same leg space - see attached photo of the ProAce Executive.

Toyota ProAce Executive with rear facing 2nd row seats.jpg
 

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I don't know why someone would like to do that type of seating arrangement in a vehicle. Of course, to each his own. But there are too many negatives to it.
"That type of seating arrangement" is very enjoyable in a recreational environment and promotes efficiency in a business environment.

Here's a photo of the opposed seating in one of the buses customized for the Kansas City Ski Club in which we were very active. I've done probably more than 50,000 miles in these buses and my wife has done far more than that on trips to and from Rocky Mountain ski areas. My wife and I always volunteered to sit facing the rear since that didn't bother us - doing that made some people ill although having a well stocked bar on the bus might have been the real reason for that.

Here's another photo of an interior of the type of corporate aircraft that I used to frequently ride in a "previous lifetime". The seats were always opposed and allowed easy group conversation.

Kansas City Ski Club bus interior.jpg Learjet interior.jpg
 

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What's the impact on your car insurance if you modify the seats to face the rear? IMO it would be prudent to disclose the modification to your insurer. The Sienna was designed to meet safety standards with the seats facing forward. I'm no expert, but I doubt the safety situation - even with seat/shoulder belts - is the same with the seats facing the rear. At a minimum you'd want to be sure your insurer knows how the vehicle is configured to avoid nasty surprises in the event (God forbid) of an accident with injuries.
 
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