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I agree with everything everyone has already said, but I would raise one front tire off the ground (one at a time) and see if the constant velocity joints in the axles are loose. That was my problem before. It only vibrated when accelerating and only between 45 and 65 mph. but each one will wear different and give a different sign. It is easy to jack up one tire and turn it by hand while you lie down there to look. there should be zero play between the turn of the wheel and the axle. good luck
 

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The front-end is really not all that complicated, so it should be an easy diagnosis, but possibly an expensive fix if you're paying someone to do the work. If just the steering wheel is vibrating, it has to be something attached to your steering. I would state that most causes of high-speed vibrations are either wheel balance or alignment issues. Out of round wheels can cause it, but diagnosis is usually moving the front wheels to the back and see if it goes away. After that, you have tie rods, ball joints, control arms, and bearings. I'm not sure if you're taking this to a general mechanic, a quickie shop or specialized places but I would still suspect anything that you haven't replaced. So, I'll say the brakes and tires are off the list. I would absolutely suspect the front-end suspension components because the phrase, "They checked suspension," means a lot of things, which are mostly demonstrations of mediocrity. Usually, they look at it, see no leaks/torn boots then shake the tires with the car on a lift and see if there is any obvious play. Essentially no one ACTUALLY checks the suspension with the proscribed diagnostics. In addition, chain tire shops and even some independent places are notorious for doing a really bad job aligning wheels. When I got 2 tires, they did a 4-wheel alignment and told me it was all good. When I was changing the struts, I found that the ball joins were totally shot and oozing grease, the tire rod boots were shredded and everything was loose.There is NO way they could have aligned anything. So, my conclusion is, you can start throwing parts at it or just take it to a stealership and have them diagnose it. It will be $150 just to diagnose the problem and the total bill will probably run you $500-$1000, but the problem will be fixed. If you have a good, trustworthy general mechanic (different from the one who already threw his hands up), you could try that and maybe get out of there with a few more dollars in your pocket. However, this seems to be the case of trying to find someone who is young, knowledgeable and loves the challenge or is old and has seen it all. If the shop is full of 30-something mechanics, go someplace else.
O beg to disagree! Shaking is not an alignment issue. Alignment symptoms can be observed when driving in a straight road, hands off the steering wheel, vehicle either pulling to the right or left! That’s alignment.
Vibrations can be checked through proper balancing and rotation.
 

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Suspension problems affect the tire wear patterns. Does the car drive straight? My cars’ histories: bad wheel bearings front right and left (destroyed two tires. One rear bearings (caught in time. On these cars at 90,000 miles. Control arm at 200,000 was bad to damage all four tires. I agree with the note on the quality of mechanics. It should have been detected on the alignments, Tire rotation, brakes inspection . A simple shaking or prying of the parts.
The rear wheel bearings was found during an annual safety inspection instead of the now smog inspection only.
 

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O beg to disagree! Shaking is not an alignment issue. Alignment symptoms can be observed when driving in a straight road, hands off the steering wheel, vehicle either pulling to the right or left! That’s alignment.
Vibrations can be checked through proper balancing and rotation.
There are numerous problems that can be caused by a bad alignment. One of those problems can be checked the way you describe. It has to be done on an uncrowned road or driving down the middle. You can also see that, when driving straight, your steering wheel will be slightly turned. However, coming from the State that is routinely in the running every year for "Worst roads in the Country" (Ususally first place; Sometimes as low third place), alignments typically need to be done every 6 months or so. Bad alignments cause shimmy, bad tracking, uneven tire wear, poor handling and even lower gas mileage. And they absolutely cause front-end vibrations.
 

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I would really encourage you to replace your front axles. If you look online enough you'll see a lot of other folks who've chased this problem only to eventually have to replace the axles.

Speaking from my own experience, my shaking felt like it was coming from the front but it was actually the rear arm bushing in the back was bad. It caused my tires to warp, so I'm about to take that repair on in the upcoming weeks. Should be fun.
 

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Good to see the thread , but I am not sure if anyone has a solution .
I drive a 2006 Sienna ( 140K) , last week I did got the tire rotated at Costoco and went for a 500 miles camping . The car shakes a lot as soon as it hits 65-70 mph . I am not sure as to why this could happen . I was not able to check the pressure on the tires , I am going to check that tmmrw , but this is only recent change on my side .

Reading the post I am in doubt if its just the tires , may be something else .
 

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Good to see the thread , but I am not sure if anyone has a solution .
I drive a 2006 Sienna ( 140K) , last week I did got the tire rotated at Costoco and went for a 500 miles camping . The car shakes a lot as soon as it hits 65-70 mph . I am not sure as to why this could happen . I was not able to check the pressure on the tires , I am going to check that tmmrw , but this is only recent change on my side .

Reading the post I am in doubt if its just the tires , may be something else .
If it happened after a tire rotation, I would say it's one of two things...

The back rim is warped. This happens a lot. You hit a curb and warp a front rim and, instead of buying a new one from a junkyard, you listen to the guy behind the counter who just suggests moving it to the back so you don't feel the vibration.

Alternately, they did a full rotation where front tires go to the back and switch sides. This is great for the tires, but requires they do a high speed balance again (which they should be doing anyway) because the tires are going the opposite directions. I don't know why that matters, because balanced should be balanced, but that's what "they" say needs to be done. Most quickie places and chain shops just switch the front tires to the back for a "rotation" to avoid the re-balance of the wheels. Of course, you could have had a back-wheel vibration from an out of balance wheel all along, but it's harder to feel because you don't typically sit in the back while you drive.
 

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I completed the repair on my 2007 Sienna this weekend, I replaced the rear arm bushings, it was a beast of a job but we were able to do it. With the new bushings and new struts, I also replaced the tires since the vibration warped on of them. After all that the vibration is gone. I thought the issue was in the front but it turns out those bushings are extremely important.
 

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Thanks. Found it on a diagram.
Toyota Part# 48725-08020

Didn't see any solid instructions but it looks like a pain to do, did you have to buy or rent any special tools to press it in or out ?
 

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Thanks. Found it on a diagram.
Toyota Part# 48725-08020

Didn't see any solid instructions but it looks like a pain to do, did you have to buy or rent any special tools to press it in or out ?
Rented a press to put the new bearings in, used some parts from around the shop and some from the kit. Getting the bearings out is a bit of a beast. I used a mix of cutting it out with a red hot knife and using a drill bit to get all the old rubber out. Once that's out you have to take a hammer and chisel and get the out ring out. It takes a lot of time and it's a messy job. It's 100% worth it though.
 
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