Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
2015 Toyota sienna se with tech part
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hi, dear all.
i bought the 2015 sienna se 3 weeks ago.
after change the engine oil, they suggest me change the transmission fluid.
my sienna has 115k miles already, i had check the owner book, and did some research, in the owner book, it doesn't have the information about transmission fluid change interval. in the internet, someone said This transmission is Maintenance-free.
now i am confuse.
would you please let me know how do you deal with transmission fluid change.
thank you very much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Although it isn't required by the maintenance schedule, a transmission fluid change at this milage is recommend for long transmission life. You should also think about having the spark plugs replaced. They are due at 120,000 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
If you don't have the maintenance history on the van then at this mileage i would avoid a full tranny flush and would only do multiple drain and refills. Start with one now and then do two more, 1K miles apart. After that get the van on a flush schedule every 25-30K.
I would say taht stick with the OEM WS fluid from Toyota. Nothing against other aftermarket equivalent fluids (Valvoline etc) that are spec'd to the same WS standard but with that high a mileage with lack of maintenance history, you would want to minimize the variables that could cause potential trouble
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,753 Posts
The maintenance schedule for my 2014 specifies a transmission fluid change every 60,000 miles only when the vehicle is used under "special operating conditions" which includes "towing, using a car-top carrier, or heavy vehicle loading". My towing is pretty light weight so I compromised and had a Toyota dealership change the transmission fluid at 90,000 miles. Maybe it wasn't necessary but I tend to be cautious.

I generally maintain vehicles under the special operating conditions or severe service maintenance schedule. Maybe it's wasteful but we've passed a number of vehicles to family members and friends that eventually went 300,000+ miles with no engine or transmission issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,753 Posts
Using a roof box is heavy use? That's so strange, at most you're adding like 100/150 pounds.
Wind resistance makes the transmission work harder although it's probably not as bad with modern aerodynamic roof boxes. I remember the removable metal roof rack I used on a VW Rabbit I bought in 1975 - it was an official VW accessory. Piling luggage on it turned the car into a unstable slug on the highway due to the wind resistance. There's nothing like driving across Kansas in summer in a VW Rabbit with the windows down (no optional A/C) and luggage piled on top while dodging tumbleweeds flying across the highway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
With that amount of miles on it, Never do a full flush at the dealer unless you know the history on it. If previous owner had flushes done on regular intervals, maybe, but that even makes me a tad nervous with the higher miles on it. Drain and refill a few times is the way to go. Enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
With that amount of miles on it, Never do a full flush at the dealer unless you know the history on it. If previous owner had flushes done on regular intervals, maybe, but that even makes me a tad nervous with the higher miles on it. Drain and refill a few times is the way to go. Enjoy.
Why the resistance to a full flush. what is the downside?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Why the resistance to a full flush. what is the downside?
Thanks
I'm kind of curious about this too, although I don't think it's relevant to my personal situation. I.e. our new (to us) 2015 AWD with 57k miles. I'm planning on a flush and new fluid at 60k because our Sienna has an aftermarket hitch and I don't know what the PO towed with it. I'd like to start our ownership with fresh fluid, just for peace of mind..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,748 Posts
Why the resistance to a full flush. what is the downside? Thanks
It's an interesting topic.... Toyota's official stance is to do the 3x pan drain & refill, which over time removes around 85% of the old fluid +/-. They actually issued a TSB a few years ago strongly recommending against the use of flush machines on general principle. And yet there probably isn't a Toyota dealer out there that doesn't own one and push the service on customers.

My own experience with them on my 2008 (U151e with WS fluid) and 2015 (U660e with WS fluid) Sienna vans has been positive. In both cases at around 70k I began to experience some new sounds and some less than optimal shift performance. Both vans had/have Platinum coverage to 125k miles, so I brought them in. Both times the advisors pushed flushes as the first recommended action (but at owner expense as routine maintenance), with the promise of a pan drop if I was not satisfied with the improvement. The improvement was pretty dramatic, so I guess I'm sold on the general idea.

So I'd say to consider a flush IF your unit isn't too far gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
There may be some that will disagree, but what I’ve seen first hand with friends doing a full flush at high miles for the first time is they all started having slippage issues. I’ve read on various auto blogs that after lots of miles, like over 100k, there will be small metal shavings that come off. Many get stuck to the magnets, but some get stuck in the clutch packs. They act like grit or sand paper that actually help keep them from slipping. A good complete flush will wash away a lot of them and thus more chance for slippage to occur. If regular flushes are done, this problem typically doesn’t occur, but how many of us, me include, do this regularly. So with higher mileage tranny’s, a drain and refill will allow the bits of metal to stay in there. You won’t get all the fluid out, but you could always do 2 or 3 drain/refills over a short period of time. That will help get most of the older fluid out. But I do agree with many on here that there is no such thing as lifetime fluid. It’s man made. It will break down and need to be changed from time to time. Give it a whirl on your own. There are plenty of instructions out there. I always find it rewarding to work on projects like that even know my wife would disagree. 😀. Good luck.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top