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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For anyone comparing the Pacifica vs the Sienna, the Car Care Nut just posted a very detailed technical review of the Pacifica.

I commend Chrysler for making a plug in hybrid minivan, but this further demonstrates that it probably won't be a long-term reliable or trouble-free car to own.
The Car Care Nut makes a point to say this very clearly, several times. Not a long term reliable van.

CONS:
1. New design and tech for Chrysler, combined with many complicated cooling/heat transfer systems.
2. No heat pump for heating the cabin on battery only - when it's cold and you call for heat in the cabin, the engine runs to make cabin heat. (The RAV4 Prime has a heat pump and can run on ONLY battery in the cold, and make heat for the cabin)
3. He said it's basically useless in cold climates, as the engine will basically always run. And it's a V6.

PROS:
1. Interior (on the top trim) looks really nice and has some nice features.
2. If you are planning to own/lease this during the warranty period, it may be a nice daily ride.
 

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You feel that about the XSE specifically? Or the Sienna in general?
The Sienna in general. It seems easy to knock the Pacifica while ignoring all the flaws about the Sienna. I'm not saying the Pacifica is better necessarily. I just think this video knocks a lot of things on the Chrysler while ignoring many of the Sienna's shortcomings.
 

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hybrid just means more money overall. Don't do it, if you think you are "saving gas money" with a van or suv. The maintenance cost on hybrids is VERY high. For cars it is a little different because of the size and gas savings.

Literally the only reliable hybrid is the Toyota Prius. And even then, the battery cells only go 8 to 15 years max. Sometimes less.

This new tech is FAR from reliable. And the hybrid batteries are just dug into the earth, where they decompose. Far from "earth friendly".
 

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hybrid just means more money overall. Don't do it, if you think you are "saving gas money" with a van or suv. The maintenance cost on hybrids is VERY high. For cars it is a little different because of the size and gas savings.

Literally the only reliable hybrid is the Toyota Prius. And even then, the battery cells only go 8 to 15 years max. Sometimes less.

This new tech is FAR from reliable. And the hybrid batteries are just dug into the earth, where they decompose. Far from "earth friendly".
Hybrid maintenance costs: additional inverter coolant change required, battery filters need to be cleaned occasionally. Other than that, not sure what are the "VERY high" costs associated with a Toyota hybrid. You most likely will save on brakes though. Here's actual data: Toyota Highlander (gas version) 10-year maintenance costs are estimated at $5771 (Toyota Highlander Maintenance Schedule and Costs) vs Highlander Hybrid at $5963 (Toyota Highlander Hybrid Maintenance Schedule and Costs). You will easily save more than $200 on fuel with the hybrid Highlander.

Not sure why the Prius is the only reliable hybrid. All the Toyota hybrids basically use the same design. As for battery cells going 8-15 years, well, the average life span of ENTIRE CARS in America is only 12 years (How Many Miles Can a Car Last?). Chances are other things will go on the car before the battery.

Toyota hybrid tech is hardly new. In fact, Toyota is being accused of falling behind and using "ancient technology". Can't please everyone I guess. Hybrid batteries, especially NIMH, are highly recyclable. I'd be surprised if hybrid batteries are the biggest source of NiMH cells anyway, given the extremely high number of NiMH rechargeable batteries made and sold for consumer uses. There will always be an environmental impact to driving, even the good old 12V lead acid batteries are toxic and can't be dumped, requiring processing to avoid environmental contamination.
 

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Hybrid maintenance costs: additional inverter coolant change required, battery filters need to be cleaned occasionally. Other than that, not sure what are the "VERY high" costs associated with a Toyota hybrid. You most likely will save on brakes though. Here's actual data: Toyota Highlander (gas version) 10-year maintenance costs are estimated at $5771 (Toyota Highlander Maintenance Schedule and Costs) vs Highlander Hybrid at $5963 (Toyota Highlander Hybrid Maintenance Schedule and Costs). You will easily save more than $200 on fuel with the hybrid Highlander.

Not sure why the Prius is the only reliable hybrid. All the Toyota hybrids basically use the same design. As for battery cells going 8-15 years, well, the average life span of ENTIRE CARS in America is only 12 years (How Many Miles Can a Car Last?). Chances are other things will go on the car before the battery.

Toyota hybrid tech is hardly new. In fact, Toyota is being accused of falling behind and using "ancient technology". Can't please everyone I guess. Hybrid batteries, especially NIMH, are highly recyclable. I'd be surprised if hybrid batteries are the biggest source of NiMH cells anyway, given the extremely high number of NiMH rechargeable batteries made and sold for consumer uses. There will always be an environmental impact to driving, even the good old 12V lead acid batteries are toxic and can't be dumped, requiring processing to avoid environmental contamination.
Just look in the Sienna maintenance guide. There is not much maintenance there. My previous ICE cars had more maintenance work required.

My only gripe about the Sienna is the outdated tech. But I knew that going in. I chose reliability over tech, in this case.

As for Chrysler, my dad had a few Chrysler company cars over the years, and I would sometimes drive them extended periods. Without exception they were all crap. This included a 300M and a Pacifica (non-hybrid). They looked decently nice and the tech was nice but it exuded a feeling of cheapness and didn't seem like something that would last 10+ years. The Pacifica is only 2 years old and has been back to the dealer for several unplanned repairs, including one LED headlight failing entirely.
 

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The interior of the Pacifica is beautiful and the options are cool, the camera thing and the games preloaded on the tv. This all hides the abysmal build quality and reliability issues.
I don't think there's anything wrong with the build quality, its just not engineered like a Toyota. The panel gaps are fine and the paint quality is fantastic, compared the the Sienna's thin paint. An example of the higher quality the Pacifica is the stitching on the dash. On the Sienna its fake molded in, like from the 80's, on the Pacifica its real, like on a high end European car.
 

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hybrid just means more money overall. Don't do it, if you think you are "saving gas money" with a van or suv. The maintenance cost on hybrids is VERY high. For cars it is a little different because of the size and gas savings.

Literally the only reliable hybrid is the Toyota Prius. And even then, the battery cells only go 8 to 15 years max. Sometimes less.

This new tech is FAR from reliable. And the hybrid batteries are just dug into the earth, where they decompose. Far from "earth friendly".
Idno, I remember doing the math on gas saved considering the cost of the van vs. buying an older Sienna with an ICE but lower m, and it came out at about a wash over 10 years. And this was assuming gas prices stayed March 2021 prices.

The one unexpected hit was the high CA tax for hybrids. Though we miss out on paying the tax at the pump, they found a way to get their tax money through registration.

Having worked at a mechanic shop I can say that hybrids never really had much maintenance done when they came in. And this was from seeing mostly all toyotas and hondas. Mostly oil changes and tire rotations.
But this Chysler hybrid seems like another story. The pacifica forums have some really scary stories of cars randomly shutting down while driving, and with minimal time to react to move to a safe spot.
 

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Stellantis just issued a recall for the Pacifica sudden engine shutdown, traced to a wiring connector problem in the transmission. 67K US vehicles, 2017-2023 which I would guess is the entire model run.

 

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Stellantis just issued a recall for the Pacifica sudden engine shutdown, traced to a wiring connector problem in the transmission. 67K US vehicles, 2017-2023 which I would guess is the entire model run.

Our friends at the pacifica forums are not too happy about the “fix”.

 

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Our friends at the pacifica forums are not too happy about the “fix”.
Well my first thought reading the recall was, how does a software update fix a connector short? Sounds like they just mask the problem. Fix a check engine light by taking out the bulb type of solution?

Edit: okay I read the recall notice again. The solution is give some time for driver to pull over before it fails. Seriously, that’s the fix???
 

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As a past owner of a 2021 Pacifica Hybrid, I would massively recommend that you avoid that vehicle if at all possible.

I do want to say, I loved the van. The PHEV is an awesome theory. The van is very comfy. I think its the best looking minivan.
I even think about trying another one. But then I remember the ownership experience, and I just can't do it.

The rear entertainment system broke on literally day 2 of ownership and it didn't get fixed for 101 days.
WIthin that 101 days there were a number of visits to the dealer to attempt RES fixes, and other additional electrical system faults which finally was resolved by replacing the 12v battery, as well as the application of various TSBs and software updates.
The power door systems had issues throughout ownership.
The car had an intermittent no start issue throughout ownership.

The worst of it was when the transmission system failed and locked the car in park unable to be moved, requiring a tow to the dealership. This was exacerbated by the fact that this transmission system failed while sitting in a restaurant drive-through lane. Which meant our van failure literally shutdown a restaurants drive-through business for 2+hrs waiting for a tow truck.

The last straw was when some part of the coolant system had a major failure that the dealership required I NOT drive the vehicle. Getting the part and van fixed took 48 days. Literally being unable to drive the van while it sat at the dealer for 48 days waiting on a critical part.

Never mind that ALL of this happened within 1700 miles from brand new.
Overall dealer trips with somewhere between 7-10 between May and December, I stopped counting.

I ended up deciding to trade it away vs to lemon law the vehicle because of how long the LL process CAN take in WA state.

And wouldnt you know it... while we were literally sitting in the Hyundai dealership parking lot, the PacHy decided to throw another transmission fault causing the vehicle to not be able to shift out of park or moving in any way. The Hyundai dealer still took the trade at the same value as before the fault, since they knew there was a manufacturers warranty to take care of it before they sold it off.

It was at the dealer at least 7-10 times in the 9 months I owned it.
Had "something" broken or fully not able to drive the van at all for 149 days of the 260 days I owned it.
Within ONLY 2569 miles.

I would LOVE if Stellantis could make this PHEV system work. But based on my experience, others on the pacifica forums, and also the recalls that we have seen on the PacHy and the Jeep 4xe, my advice is hard avoid.
 

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Well my first thought reading the recall was, how does a software update fix a connector short? Sounds like they just mask the problem. Fix a check engine light by taking out the bulb type of solution?

Edit: okay I read the recall notice again. The solution is give some time for driver to pull over before it fails. Seriously, that’s the fix???
Last year, there was a recall of 2017-2018 Pacifica Hybrids catching fire when plugged in for charging. It took months for the problem to be identified, in the meantime owners were told not to plug in their vans and park them outdoors away from structures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That ownership experience is insane. I'm speechless.
As the new Sienna will be for my wife and 3 kids, I can't even imagine dealing with that. The thought of swapping car seats, baby stuff, and the general stuff that lives in my wife's car, and having to deal with a rental/loaner for weeks at a time....
This is why I'm waiting about a year now for a Sienna (that I still don't have)
 
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