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2023 Toyota Sienna 25AE AWD
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Just wow! That must've been scary for the driver and its passengers. Glad they were safe in the Sienna. These guys who recovered are just awesome at what they do. Thanks for sharing! 馃憤
 

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That was impressive. The loads and forces that were pulling on those wheels (and the entire chassis of the van) were huge. The cosmetic damage to the van didn't seem too bad. Fixable. I'll bet the costliest repairs may be with the undercarriage stuff. Fixable though. I wonder if the frame has any tweaks from the pulling.
I'm wondering about all of the engine idling at that 45+ degree angle, as far as oil pressure/pump getting oil in the pan. I haven't seen the shape of the Sienna engine oil pan. Maybe the oil was able to stay in there and there's no issue.
Again, very impressive recovery.
 

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The most significant portion of staying on the road in bad weather is the driver. I have great experience on snow and ice for decades. As a 12 year old kid, (yea, on the ranch we drove on the ranch at 12) Dad told us to take the car out on a frozen field, and "have fun" putting the car in a spin, and taking them out of the spin. So, when you get to a real spin, you know just what to do, you have practiced it already 100 times. Or, better yet, you have a feel of how fast you can go without going into a spin. Its just part of driver training that most people dont have.
My advice is to "up your driving skill level" by finding a frozen field or parking lot (without obstructions or other cars) and just practice. Its great fun. I cant tell you how many times that skill has saved my life.
 

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The most significant portion of staying on the road in bad weather is the driver. I have great experience on snow and ice for decades. As a 12 year old kid, (yea, on the ranch we drove on the ranch at 12) Dad told us to take the car out on a frozen field, and "have fun" putting the car in a spin, and taking them out of the spin. So, when you get to a real spin, you know just what to do, you have practiced it already 100 times. Or, better yet, you have a feel of how fast you can go without going into a spin. Its just part of driver training that most people dont have.
My advice is to "up your driving skill level" by finding a frozen field or parking lot (without obstructions or other cars) and just practice. Its great fun. I cant tell you how many times that skill has saved my life.
I did the same in NJ in the mall parking lots after the first snow each year. Once got stopped by a cop for doing donuts and I said would you rather me learn to drive in the snow here or out on a busy road. He left me alone.
 

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I, for one, would much rather "other drivers" be experienced at putting a car in a spin, or taking it out of one on slick roads. In places where it snows a lot, like Leadville Colorado or Alaska, most everyone knows how to drive on ice or snow, and their are few problems. That is, unless visitors, who dont understand driving in snow and ice, drive there a lot.
In Ohio, they pour tons and tons of salt on the roads. Its a very bad idea, on multiple levels. First people rarely ever learn to drive on ice and snow, since "the government" does their best to make sure there is hardly ever any ice or snow, so people just dont get good at driving here. Then, for a few hours after a storm but before the roads get salted, cars are slipped off the road everywhere.
And, of course, road salt "eats your car alive" and car companies love them. If they use salt, rest assured there will be many many cars rusted out and worthless after about 10 years. It even rusts the frame and critical parts making cars dangerous to drive.

Colorado has banned salt for very good reasons, like those mentioned above. Its one of those "supposedly good ideas" that turn out to create more problems than they solve. The problem, is of, course, learning to drive on ice and snow, and salting the roads, means people often never learn to drive in it. Salt exacerbates that problem rather than solves it.
 

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I, for one, would much rather "other drivers" be experienced at putting a car in a spin, or taking it out of one on slick roads. In places where it snows a lot, like Leadville Colorado or Alaska, most everyone knows how to drive on ice or snow, and their are few problems. That is, unless visitors, who dont understand driving in snow and ice, drive there a lot.
In Ohio, they pour tons and tons of salt on the roads. Its a very bad idea, on multiple levels. First people rarely ever learn to drive on ice and snow, since "the government" does their best to make sure there is hardly ever any ice or snow, so people just dont get good at driving here. Then, for a few hours after a storm but before the roads get salted, cars are slipped off the road everywhere.
And, of course, road salt "eats your car alive" and car companies love them. If they use salt, rest assured there will be many many cars rusted out and worthless after about 10 years. It even rusts the frame and critical parts making cars dangerous to drive.

Colorado has banned salt for very good reasons, like those mentioned above. Its one of those "supposedly good ideas" that turn out to create more problems than they solve. The problem, is of, course, learning to drive on ice and snow, and salting the roads, means people often never learn to drive in it. Salt exacerbates that problem rather than solves it.
I hear you.

Should be part of drivers ed to teach winter driving techniques and on a road just not theory.

As you said the road salt or beet brime that they use often will continue as many out of towners without real winter driving experience.
 

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I agree, Pamhar. Remember, when people are unable to control their vehicle, due to alcohol, drugs, distracted driving, or, yes inexperience in Ice and snow, they are risking YOUR life also. Someone should start a business teaching people to drive on ice and snow..with practice..it wouldnt be that hard to have a clear field and a car where you could not hurt much even if you went out of control. The military trains for battle...even tho, not all military ever even see "the battle field". But, when they do, I bet they are glad they are trained. No, not everyone may see ice and snow, but certainly, in the northern states that get a lot of snow, they should train with snow/ice to save their, and other's lives. No matter how skilled I am, if you lose control of your vehicle, and crash into mine..it can kill me, "even if IM parked and not moving.".
 
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