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just ordered a XLE and am happy at this point with my decision but I am always wondering why everyone picked sienna over odyssey. what was the reasons you have for the choice?

Also for anyone that is lucky enough to be driving a 2022 sienna, how do you like it and knowing now what you didnt back then, would you have still picked it?
 

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As a former owner of a 2003 Odyssey EX, 2007 EX-L and a 2012 EX. When we looked at getting a new Van. It was between a 2022 Odyssey and 2022 Sienna. The 2012 Odyssey has 318 000 Km and is now the second vehicle for around town. I found the 2022 Odyssey came with a rear entertainment system on the EX model. I have no interest in a RES. It was more expensive than the 2022 LE FWD model we purchased. Honda's interest rate at the time was higher. My 2007 and 2012 have 248 HP the Sienna Hybrid has 245 HP
We waited 6 months for delivery. Mine now has 2500Km. The first fill-up I did when empty had travelled 941 km on 59 litres of fuel. The best I ever got from the 2012 Odyssey was around 630 km on 72 litres of fuel. I really enjoy the fact that the engine is off and the Air conditioning is running off the battery pack when stopped at a light it gets the same fuel economy when driving around town as driving on the highway. It stays on Battery under 30 kmh unless you put your foot down or the battery drops below a certain level. The Odyssey would use 13 litres per 100km when driving around town. We are very pleased with the new Sienna we really believe we made a great choice. We ordered ours last December before the huge gas price increase.
 

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AWD and hybrid fuel economy. The Sienna is the only choice.
These are the main reasons. I think interior material quality on the odyssey is better. I also like the lack of a center console because it feels more open. That engine is dead nuts reliable, and the van feels faster overall. But for a point a to point b vehicle, the fuel savings were hard to ignore.
 

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The only features an odessy has that the sienna is missing is the rear seat camera for watching kids and lane changing camera. Both I can live without so the Sienna has everything else that is needed.
 

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The 5th gen Odyssey appears to have its bugs worked out after a rough launch, the 2023 is supposed to be the final year. There are members over at OdyClub.com that have bought their second 5th gen Odyssey, which I find kind of weird having gone 18 years between Sienna purchases.

I'm not too concerned about the HSD's reliability - this particular powertrain combo has only been around for a few years, but Toyota has a good track record for HSD going back 2 decades. So far the van is getting the advertised 36mpg, far better than the old van's 17mpg. I'm definitely driving slower to try to get the little green EV light to show up more often. The view out the back is worse, at least there's BSM, backup camera, and parking sensors to make up for that. The 8th seat is a serious penalty box compared to Gen 2, but as everyone in the family is grown it's not going to be occupied.
 

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Odyssey transmission issues turned me off
Not exactly comparing new for me but if I were to buy a new one it would be the sienna.

I've had Honda's in the past, there's always some transmission issue 😂. My v6 accord had a transmission seal leak, and reading customer complaint website there's a lot of transmission issues. Which was why I didn't buy one last year when I was shopping for a used van. And when I was looking on craigslist, plenty of transmission repairs/replacement 😂. No thanks
 

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I wanted a hybrid AWD 6+seater. Odyssey doesn't have either AWD or Hybrid options. Also, I do not trust Honda as a brand.

I did consider Pacifica PHEV, as to my eye it is the best-looking, really classy, roomy and well-equipped minivan. But it had three dealbreaker-grade deficiencies in my eyes: (1) Chrysler as a brand with its perceived quality struggles and the seemingly permanent "one foot in the grave" status, (2) No AWD hybrid powertrain, and (3) Concerns about the ability of our local Stellantis dealership, who is heavily focused on the Dodge, Jeep, and Ram brands, to troubleshoot and maintain the PHEV machinery. Knowing what I know now about Gen 4 Sienna's real build quality and design blunders, I kind of regret not taking a much closer look at the Pacifica PHEV.

Among the additional benefits of the Gen 4 Sienna of any trim is its unrivaled driving range. Half tank is 360 if not 370 miles in the summer and 300+ miles in the winter (the way I drive). Also, the traction battery is Ni-MH (which is IMO better match for hybrids than Li-Ion) and is warrantied for 150K miles. The central console with the "bridge" would be pretty clever, if not for the God-awful, credit card-eating lid.

I got the xle so no awd, but yes I agree the fuek economy is the biggest selling point. I just hope that because this engine system is not long term tested that we will not all run into major issues down the line.
I guess what you say means that in Canada you can't get XLE with AWD?

The powertrain, based on the A25A-FXS Atkinson cycle engine and e-CVT in the Gen 4 Sienna is not that new. The A25A-FXS has been around since 2018, and before it found its way into the Sienna it had been used in RAV4, Camry, Avalon, Venza, and many Lexus models. The e-CVT has been around I think Gen 2 Prius and I believe it is the most reliable transmission of all time.

I worry more about the longevity of the box than the engine in the Sienna.
 

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We had both a 2011 Sienna AWD and a 2014 Odyssey for years (both purchased new). We still have the Ody (105k miles), but sold the '11 Sienna (131k miles) when we got the '22 Sienna. I always told people that the Odyssey was a better van but the Sienna was a better car. What I meant by that was that the drivetrain of the Sienna blew the Ody away, but the "living with it" aspect went to the Odyssey - middle row of seats in Ody was great for car seat anchors, rear seat folding mechanism is better in the Ody etc.). The Sienna was ever so slightly more reliable than the Ody (notwithstanding the Sienna's rear differential bearing and sliding door issues, the latter of which was fixed for free). In that time the Ody had a CV shaft prematurely fail, had a failure of the rear 12V power outlet that was actually a pretty big deal (I had purchased the extended warranty, so that's good). So I guess on second thought, they were similarly reliable, but the Ody requires more maintenance to keep it going (Tranny fluid drain/fill at every oil change due to historical Ody tranny issues, timing belt/water pump etc.).

That all said, as others have mentioned, the AWD/Hybrid was why we chose the Sienna this time around - didn't even look at the Ody. Honestly, if the Pacifica Hybrid was offered in AWD, we might have gone that direction - Chrysler's interior is way better than Toyota's with its lame cupholders etc.

We've had our new Sienna for 3 weeks and already have 2600 miles on it (road trip). It performed admirably, though with lower mpg than expected when road tripping (low 30s) through the great plains (so speeds of 75+). When we were driving in South Dakota - where the posted speed limit is 80 - I set the cruise at 88 for a bit and the fuel economy dropped to about 24. I decided that was too high a price to pay at current gas prices to shave a few minutes off of the trip. Side note: the van handled the speed extremely well - never felt out of control at all (that said, farm land is notoriously straight and flat).

I think that my number one gripe with the '22 is the useless cupholders - front has 6 if you count the doors, but only 2 of them can fit even relatively small coffee cups (Yeti or Stanley style). 3rd row cupholders are even worse. Middle row floor ones (built into front center console) aren't too bad.

Also, the new Sienna overall just seems a little cheap. All the rear plastic panels seem super-thin. When the rear seats fold into the floor they are just kind of lumpy and floppy - not solid at all.

I went a lot of random places in that post, hope it was helpful.
 

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I got the xle so no awd, but yes I agree the fuek economy is the biggest selling point. I just hope that because this engine system is not long term tested that we will not all run into major issues down the line.
Nothing fairly new under the 2021-22 Sienna's hood. All these hybrid systems are from 5 years ago so nothing needs to worry about.

However, I do find one thing that I haven't known before I own any Toyota car, which is the quality. I have a 2013 Lexus RX350 with no issue at all, so I kind of trust the Lexus brand, and think maybe Toyota is the same. I got my XSE in Apr 2022, so in just 3 months, multiple places started to play funny noises, I had the dealer check the left slide door and they lubricated the weather trim, now it's slightly better, than the driver's door started as well, followed by the passenger door. I understand this is a van-like vehicle, so it should have some noise with age, but oh man, this is again only a 3-months old vehicle.
 

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I chose the Sienna over the Ody mainly because the Sienna is a new generation that looks modern whereas the Ody is at the tail end of its generation, and looking long in the tooth. I keep cars for 15+ years so I prefer to buy top trims, but unfortunately due to the market conditions, I could only find a XLE FWD (at least I got it at MSRP!).

So far our Sienna seems fine, no quality issues, and the mpg is amazing for such a huge car. Of course, it's not particularly fast, but it's entirely adequate for normal driving.
 

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I've owned 3 used Ody's since 2004 (one was totalled). I stopped buying Ody when they only offered it in V6 (VCM - variable cylinder management) in 2010. I was never a believer of saving 1-2mpg and making that over-complicated VCM system. I was happy when Honda dropped the VCM system in 2021 just in time coz i was in the market again for a bigger vehicle (bigger than my 2010 Mercedes ML320 CDI - diesel).

Fast forward to 2021 - i rented 2 minivans for a trip to Hilton Head. Lo and behold - they gave me 2 brand new Siennas LE. I was surprised it was a Hybrid (Aug 2021). Honestly, i was blown away by the performance and fuel economy. We were full ( 6 adults per van plus luggage aka overloaded ). Those 2 siennas just kept on even going up the Appalachian mountains. I never had that much power on the 3 Ody's I owned (not exactly apples to apples i thought). So i placed an order immediately after our vacation.
 

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OP doesn't care much about AWD (no one has to), but I got ours for AWD. Hybrid mileage and Chrysler's below average reputation sealed the deal. I have to admit that I was tempted for Pinnacle Pacifica since it was thousands less, but skipped for reasons mentioned above. I got lucky and got a perfact match for us. 30K into it, I don't have any second thoughts. ( To be fair, Sienna has its own minor annoyances - top of the list are card/keys/tags eating center console, and infrequent droning noise.)
 

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I've owned 3 used Ody's since 2004 (one was totalled). I stopped buying Ody when they only offered it in V6 (VCM - variable cylinder management) in 2010. I was never a believer of saving 1-2mpg and making that over-complicated VCM system. I was happy when Honda dropped the VCM system in 2021 just in time coz i was in the market again for a bigger vehicle (bigger than my 2010 Mercedes ML320 CDI - diesel).
Honda didn't drop the VCM system. It's still in use. Never did see an issue with that on my 2013 Honda Pilot though. I couldn't even tell if it was on or off except for the ECO light on the dash. Of course I sold it at ~130k miles so idk if it'll have long term issues down the road. But none of the common complaints like vibration, oil consumption, etc. I went 10k between oil changes and the oil would still be above the low mark on the dipstick without adding any.

If you think the 3/4/6 cylinder switch is bad, Chevy has their DFM, dynamic fuel management, on their new trucks. Their previous system, AFM, was similar to Honda's VCM. The V8 ran in either 4 or 8 cylinder modes. DFM, introduced in 2019, can run any cylinder for a single cycle (4 strokes), then turn it off. They dynamically change which cylinder is fired and use 17 different patterns to run the engine from at little as 1 or 2 cylinders up to the full 8 cylinders. They rotate through cylinders so that you don't have a bank of deactivated ones that wears quicker, and to control vibration. There's a lot more to break, but I owned a new 2020 Silverado and you could not tell the engine did this, with one exception. If I was driving at a slowish speed, with windows down, next to a concrete or similar sound reflecting barrier, I could hear the engine noises change as I pushed the pedal in and out and the cylinder activation patterns changed. Otherwise...simply couldn't tell it existed. Drove the truck from new to 43,000 miles before selling.

I don't see any manufacture with a fuel saving device eliminating that device. Simple, NA engines are on the way out. The way I see it, it's probably not long before all cars with ICE are either turbo'd, have cylinder deactivation, and/or are hybrid models. With a slow but steady drop of ICE engines altogether in favor of pure electric vehicles, but we need some better batteries before those really take off.
 
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