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I too never had issues with the VCM in our Ody, but around 100k miles I did install the device that is talked about in a lot of Ody forums that tricks the computer into not triggering VCM. This was just because I want to keep the vehicle for a few more years and don't want any issues (I watched a YouTube video of a VCM engine tear-down and it scared me). It gets driven very little since I'm still in the COVID WFH realm and my wife drives the new Sienna to work, so the mpg hit doesn't hurt all that badly.
 
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Honda didn't drop the VCM system. It's still in use. Never did see an issue with that on my 2013 Honda Pilot though. I couldn't even tell if it was on or off except for the ECO light on the dash. Of course I sold it at ~130k miles so idk if it'll have long term issues down the road. But none of the common complaints like vibration, oil consumption, etc. I went 10k between oil changes and the oil would still be above the low mark on the dipstick without adding any.

If you think the 3/4/6 cylinder switch is bad, Chevy has their DFM, dynamic fuel management, on their new trucks. Their previous system, AFM, was similar to Honda's VCM. The V8 ran in either 4 or 8 cylinder modes. DFM, introduced in 2019, can run any cylinder for a single cycle (4 strokes), then turn it off. They dynamically change which cylinder is fired and use 17 different patterns to run the engine from at little as 1 or 2 cylinders up to the full 8 cylinders. They rotate through cylinders so that you don't have a bank of deactivated ones that wears quicker, and to control vibration. There's a lot more to break, but I owned a new 2020 Silverado and you could not tell the engine did this, with one exception. If I was driving at a slowish speed, with windows down, next to a concrete or similar sound reflecting barrier, I could hear the engine noises change as I pushed the pedal in and out and the cylinder activation patterns changed. Otherwise...simply couldn't tell it existed. Drove the truck from new to 43,000 miles before selling.

I don't see any manufacture with a fuel saving device eliminating that device. Simple, NA engines are on the way out. The way I see it, it's probably not long before all cars with ICE are either turbo'd, have cylinder deactivation, and/or are hybrid models. With a slow but steady drop of ICE engines altogether in favor of pure electric vehicles, but we need some better batteries before those really take off.
Yes you are right. I must have picked up the wrong info of the Ody with my buddy who just bought a Ody in 2021. I really never went to a Honda dealer to check a new Ody. It seems VCM is no longer 3,4,6 cyl activation. The newer ones just switch between 3, 6. Still I'm no big fan of this VCM. even with Chevy/GM or any other manufacturer. Hybrid ICE/EV is the way to go with much much better MPG gains.
 
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I've owned 3 used Ody's since 2004 (one was totalled). I stopped buying Ody when they only offered it in V6 (VCM - variable cylinder management) in 2010. I was never a believer of saving 1-2mpg and making that over-complicated VCM system. I was happy when Honda dropped the VCM system in 2021 just in time coz i was in the market again for a bigger vehicle (bigger than my 2010 Mercedes ML320 CDI - diesel).

Fast forward to 2021 - i rented 2 minivans for a trip to Hilton Head. Lo and behold - they gave me 2 brand new Siennas LE. I was surprised it was a Hybrid (Aug 2021). Honestly, i was blown away by the performance and fuel economy. We were full ( 6 adults per van plus luggage aka overloaded ). Those 2 siennas just kept on even going up the Appalachian mountains. I never had that much power on the 3 Ody's I owned (not exactly apples to apples i thought). So i placed an order immediately after our vacation.
I keep wondering to myself, why is it that some Sienna drivers (including me) find the van adequately powerful to negotiate the Appalachian mountains at the speed limit - which I do at least a couple of times a week - while other posters report that the van can barely accelerate etc. Is it just the "perception vs reality" situation, or some Siennas really have defective powertrain that run out of breath on a 7% incline??
 
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Is it just the "perception vs reality" situation, or some Siennas really have defective powertrain that run out of breath on a 7% incline??
It’s the former, plus a few folks who aren’t able to realize they should take it out of Eco mode on mountains plus probably also a handful of Kia and Honda employees joining Toyota groups to amplify any negative messages possible.
 

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Automotive News now mentions that the Odyssey is going to get a freshening and mild hybrid (smaller battery, less electric assist) in calendar year 2024, with a full redesign further out.
 

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It’s the former, plus a few folks who aren’t able to realize they should take it out of Eco mode on mountains plus probably also a handful of Kia and Honda employees joining Toyota groups to amplify any negative messages possible.
Just as a data point: I always drive on Eco. I believe with Eco you still get the same power output and the throttle response, it just increases the gas pedal travel when you need hard acceleration, IMO.

Oh, I don't know about the hypothetical Kia and Honda employees. These days employees ordinarily don't give a hoot about their company or its competitors.
 

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I keep wondering to myself, why is it that some Sienna drivers (including me) find the van adequately powerful to negotiate the Appalachian mountains at the speed limit - which I do at least a couple of times a week - while other posters report that the van can barely accelerate etc. Is it just the "perception vs reality" situation, or some Siennas really have defective powertrain that run out of breath on a 7% incline??
It’s the former, plus a few folks who aren’t able to realize they should take it out of Eco mode on mountains plus probably also a handful of Kia and Honda employees joining Toyota groups to amplify any negative messages possible.
Well there was that one poster I saw asking why his Sienna idled at 1600 RPM one cold start, said none of his vehicles idled anywhere near that high, and that the brakes could “barely stop” it when it was idling this high. My Sienna briefly idles around 1600 RPM on cold start even in warm weather (60-70 degrees, haven’t don’t any truly cold starts yet and won’t till this winter), but it certainly doesn’t make the brakes “barely able” to stop the van! The thread was too old for me to reply and mention how my motorcycle with a manual enricher prefers to idle closer to 3000 RPM on cold starts till the engine is warm. :LOL: (Though that’s not quite fair since it doesn’t redline till 12,000 RPM and idles best around 1000-1200 RPM when warm, and in addition to the manual enricher circuit which will cause a super fast idle if you let it the idle speed is set manually)
 

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I keep wondering to myself, why is it that some Sienna drivers (including me) find the van adequately powerful to negotiate the Appalachian mountains at the speed limit - which I do at least a couple of times a week - while other posters report that the van can barely accelerate etc. Is it just the "perception vs reality" situation, or some Siennas really have defective powertrain that run out of breath on a 7% incline??
I think it's all perception. Because the engine gets loud, some people may be reluctant to push harder on the go-pedal to move faster. My other car is the polar opposite of a Sienna. it's a Model Y which in comparison is a super-car in terms of power.
 

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I keep wondering to myself, why is it that some Sienna drivers (including me) find the van adequately powerful to negotiate the Appalachian mountains at the speed limit - which I do at least a couple of times a week - while other posters report that the van can barely accelerate etc. Is it just the "perception vs reality" situation, or some Siennas really have defective powertrain that run out of breath on a 7% incline??
I was one of the whiners (about Sienna being underpowered.) I was hard wired to assume that loud engine noise means it has reached its limit. Over the time, I learned to ignore the droning noise and keep going at the peddle to get as fast as I want. Since then, I say I have passed 500 cars for every one that passed me, including on high grade uphills ( Ex. Vail pass.)
 

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Have anyone climbed Mt. Washington with their 4th gen sienna? I am thinking of doing it, but I know it's condition is VERY windy.
I suppose you will feel the wind for sure, but it is very stable.

You should not have any issues with the incline.
Sienna can take it very well. We have not been to Mt. Washington, but I we have been thru quite a few high grade inclines fully loaded. I was one of the fastest on the road on all of them.
 

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I was one of the whiners (about Sienna being underpowered.) I was hard wired to assume that loud engine noise means it has reached its limit. Over the time, I learned to ignore the droning noise and keep going at the peddle to get as fast as I want. Since then, I say I have passed 500 cars for every one that passed me, including on high grade uphills ( Ex. Vail pass..
I keep noticing Gen 4 Siennas fly past me like I am standing still while I am doing 70 mph on 70 mph roads :). Interestingly, I almost never see earlier Siennas do not. I think you may have explained this phenomenon. There must be a cohort of Gen 4 Sienna drivers, who didn't expect the "MegaPrius" to be a fast-lane cruiser, until they experimented with pressing the gas pedal a little harder.
 

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Riding Sienna is like eating at a cheap Chinese takeout.
Riding Oyssey is like dinning at a expensive Japanese restaurant.
Ily, With all due respect - It's 2022. Between high gas prices, air pollution and saving the environment - There is just no compelling reason to purchase a competitor van that on a good day can make 20mpg 90% of the time you own the vehicle. Whereas, our daily use Sienna's will do 35mpg 90% of the time we drive it around (assuming you only drive 10% on the freeways). Yes - i understand you might be happier accelerating faster in your minivan and I'm happy for you. You do what you do....and I'll see you at the gas pump. Maybe Ill buy you your next Unagi sushi.
 

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Riding Sienna is like eating at a cheap Chinese takeout.
Riding Oyssey is like dinning at a expensive Japanese restaurant.
Savagegeese says a lot of lines for entertainment purposes, his reviews are fun to watch. But if you look at his own Sienna review especially the long term wrap up, he's actually quite impressed with the Sienna. In fact, so much so he was saying he'd consider buying one for himself.
 

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plus probably also a handful of Kia and Honda employees joining Toyota groups to amplify any negative messages possible.
I don't know about the hypothetical Kia and Honda employees. These days employees ordinarily don't give a hoot about their company or its competitors.
I dunno, after seeing videos like the above, my comment feels more prescient. :)

And if they're from someone NOT getting financially rewarded for doing it, well... that's just really sad.
 
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