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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a vacuum leak coming from the air filter box. There is one hose that has a plastic bit broken off (labeled A in photos) and another hose that is cracked split at the end (labeled B).

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I've read through some posts here and both seem to be common enough issues. My trouble here is that on the top air filter box, there seems to be another mesh filter that is blocking my access to the A hole. I can't seem to get it off and since I can't see what's on the other side of it, I am not sure if I can safely drill through the existing hole to install a barb connector.

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As can be seen on the final photo, I don't have access to the hole with the broken plastic bit.

Another issue is that where the 10mm bolts (labeled C) meet the bottom air box, there doesn't seem to be anything for the bolts to bite onto. The bolts just turn forever, and that part of the airbox is a little loose.

I think I can get additional hoses and coupling the fix A and B, but would it be worth just replacing the air box entirely? If not, how/which parts do I get so that the bolts will tighten?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I saw that RockAuto carries the box but it's just the one connector that is broken (got the missing nuts for the 10mm bolts from a dealer for $5), so hoping not to have to replace the whole box.

Also, I found a couple more hose connections that are split and loose. Fortunately, it's the same two lines in the first photo A and B, that run to the front of the car and down to the PWM-Vacuum Switching Valve. It's kind of a pain to access it. Does anyone have a good suggestion? Seems it would be easy with the car on a lift but I don't have one. I might be able to borrow jack stands from my neighbors.
 

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Yeah I saw that RockAuto carries the box but it's just the one connector that is broken (got the missing nuts for the 10mm bolts from a dealer for $5), so hoping not to have to replace the whole box.

Also, I found a couple more hose connections that are split and loose. Fortunately, it's the same two lines in the first photo A and B, that run to the front of the car and down to the PWM-Vacuum Switching Valve. It's kind of a pain to access it. Does anyone have a good suggestion? Seems it would be easy with the car on a lift but I don't have one. I might be able to borrow jack stands from my neighbors.
Personally, if it was me, I'd replace rather than trying to repair plastic. A lifetime of using every glue imaginable to try to repair my and, now, my kids broken plastic toys tells me all I need to know about the odds of success. To your other issue of split hoses, you might be in the realm of catastrophic vacuum line failure (been there before) where every vacuum line has deteriorated to almost broken state and each time you touch anything, one will break and you'll be chasing vacuum leaks. So, while you wait for your new air box to show up, you can pick up some vacuum hose and start replacing sections. I also strongly recommend getting a set of ramps AND jack stands. Often, it's easier to just drive up the ramps rather than jacking up the car, but, obviously, that makes pulling a wheel or doing suspension work difficult. You can get each for $50(ish) and you only need to buy them once and they'll last forever. BTW, you can see that another of your hoses on the air box (in your first pic) has a small split starting. As a tip for replacement of air hoses, it's often best to cut the old one off (extremely carefully, if it's on a plastic tube) and then reinstall by dipping the end of the hose in some warm soapy water for lubrication.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I followed the vacuum diagram to look at every vacuum line, and it looks like just the ones pictured have obvious, current damage. It's actually a 3-line bundle that goes from the air box and the actuator down to the VSV. I already replaced the one you mentioned since it was the easiest one to do. The 3-line bundle, on the other hand, seems they're all different sizes 🤦 Now I'm considering just pulling the whole thing out so I can go to the store and match the hoses while I'm there. Just got two jack stands to do this + as you said, they will last forever.

I guess if anyone has info on all the vacuum line sizes (so I can just replace all of them while I'm at it) that would be real helpful.
 

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Online dealer part site shows that metal screen as a separate part in the diagram:
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Although they don't list it as available to buy. Have you tried prying it out? Perhaps it's not glued in.

Another issue is that where the 10mm bolts (labeled C) meet the bottom air box, there doesn't seem to be anything for the bolts to bite onto. The bolts just turn forever, and that part of the airbox is a little loose.
I have the same problem with one of mine. Fortunately replacing the 6mm(?) bolt allowed it to be tightened down. If not, then the captive nut in the housing is stripped. Look for a good used one in a scrap yard?
 

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Slightly different air box on my 2011 but I ran into the same issue. I drilled out the old nipple. Inserted a 1/4" irrigation line nipple from Home Depot. Clean the dirt off around the nipple with a chemical cleaner such as Goof Off and use Red RTV to seal it off. That stuff not only sticks but remains flexible. My repair is 3 years old now and holding fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:

Ended up replacing every vacuum line in the car. The one running to the canister was the most tedious one to replace, but ultimately doable. The local auto parts store didn't have the right size vacuum line for all of them, so for a few I used fuel lines instead. Total cost was about $20.
 

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Update:

Ended up replacing every vacuum line in the car. The one running to the canister was the most tedious one to replace, but ultimately doable. The local auto parts store didn't have the right size vacuum line for all of them, so for a few I used fuel lines instead. Total cost was about $20.
Smart move! I tried the piecemeal approach on a car once when I found one line broken in half with a "small leak" code. I replaced it and the code went away and I'd get a new one a month later. I just replaced all the vacuum lines and put an end to the problem. Well, sort of, until I ended up with a large leak code because the EGR system was shot, but that probably has more to do with driving in a marine environment in the rust belt.
 
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