Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

getting ready to change the spark plugs on my 2012 Toyota Sienna 6 cyl. 100,000 miles

I have read through many of the threads but would like to get a solid list of parts i need or should replace while doing this service myself.

Spark plugs - which are best?
PCV
what seals/gaskets should i replace?
What else am i forgetting, etc?

Thanks everyone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, i will take a look. I just dont want to pay the dealer close to 600 bucks for a spark plug change. Hell, they charge almost 20bucks for the plugs alone...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
It is a good vid to watch 'all' they way through before jumping in. As you can see in the vid he did not know about the bolt behind the throttle body area.



OEM gaskets are best. You will need the plenum gaskets. They are in a set of 2. You will need 3 sets. Also the throttle body gasket.



The coil connectors can be brittle. I like to use a pick on the latch part to help it release. You will find by just pushing on the tab will not release the connector.


Another note. When you take off the plenum there will be 'sandlike' stuff where the plenum sits. This needs to be cleaned up. I like to use a razor blade and scrape it away from entering the intake of the engine.


Before putting the cowl/wiper stuff back on. Double check the vacuum hoses. Especially the line to the booster as it is on the backside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Good video !!! IMHO I would not trust factory gapped plugs. I always Check them! Also, I'm not a fan of Autolite plugs. Just my opinion


BTW ... When I do mine I will be cutting a big hole in my dashboard :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone. What plugs do you recommend? I really don't want to pay $17 a plug from the dealership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Can't go wrong with NGK iridiums those will give you another 100k also. They should be almost half the price and just as good as far as I'm concerned. I have been using them for many years.

Or go here and for Denso TT and use the where to buy tool :D
http://densoautoparts.com/where-to-buy.aspx#
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Just going to quote myself from another thread, getting too late to think;
https://www.siennachat.com/forum/66-problems-maintenance-repair-gen-2/58553-2006-sienna-spark-plug-change.html

Toyota O/E Diamond are what my coils said on them from the 2010 Sienna, So I went on eBay and found Toyota O/E Diamond coils in put them in 3, but I haven't drove it a whole lot since seem to be of good quality visually and for what I've drove it they've done OK, $65 for 3 of them.

As for the other poster, if you have the 3.5 engine and your getting on the bracket for the intake manifold, take off the bracket for the wire harness on right inner fender, and you'll be reaching around through that hole with the left arm to guide the socket down, and you can go on down from top with the right hand with a ratchet, extension, and universal joint. Keep in mind this assumes also you've taken off the wiper cowl And there are 2 brake lines that go down the back of the firewall and you're following these almost exactly down to the head of that bolt that's hardest to get at.

I also recommend having the coil connectors ends on hand to replace them if you break off the little tab. You can find them on eBay And basically you're backing the wire out of the old one and keeping them in order to place them in the new one so you don't need to buy the ones with the wires attached. There is a YouTube video with a Scion on that the guy is basically crushing the connectors apart taking the wires out, if they're real brittle they'll crush like that .

If not, that's a little trickier to back each wire out individually and if you find a good flat tool to use you can do it probably fairly easily. Or when you look in the end there is an inner oval, you could cut that oval at the outer edges on each side and the wires will probably back out just a little easier. I've used the official tool for doing that, but I don't think that works very well or at least the brand tool I had didn't, so I have a flat tweezers tool I'm gonna try next, just something really flat and wide enough to release the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks, i will take a look. I just dont want to pay the dealer close to 600 bucks for a spark plug change. Hell, they charge almost 20bucks for the plugs alone...

If there are no symptoms pointing to the spark plugs, I would not have them replaced - yet. I drove 200,000 miles on my 1998 Sienna spark plugs, and when I finally had them replaced because of symptoms, the spark plugs looked still good. It was a single coil that was bad, but for mechanics that is not the first think to check, because there is not enough labor/money in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
The factory recommended replacement interval is 120,000 miles. I would not do it before then - huge job. I do most all the work myself but this was too much for me to take on. My dealer did it for $400 - it was well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Jumping in late here, but I'll share my experience as well. I changed out the plugs on our 2011 when we hit the 120k mile mark last summer. I used the NGK Iridium plugs. Couple pointers:

- Pull the windshield wiper assembly and tray and intake plenum. Some people claim you don't need to, but it doesn't take that long and it makes the job reasonable as you see in the video.
- Protect the intake openings after pulling the intake manifold. I had a mouse nest near mine so I ended up using the shop vac for a cleanup effort and put shop towels over the openings until I put the intake back
- Pull your battery cable so the engine computer resets itself with the new plugs. I didn't initially, and after restarting the engine would die after 3-4 seconds. Freaked me out at first. Resetting the computer did the trick.

Good luck. It took me about 4-5 hours start to finish and I would only consider myself mid-level mechanically inclined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
- Pull your battery cable so the engine computer resets itself with the new plugs. I didn't initially, and after restarting the engine would die after 3-4 seconds. Freaked me out at first. Resetting the computer did the trick.

I have seen this so many times. The computer (ECM) does not need to be reset when doing plugs.


There is a resistor on the cowl that needs to be plugged in. It is on the passenger side on a 2011. It is a 2 wire. The fuel pump will only run in the start position if this is not plugged in.



I am sure 'stubborn1' tried to start the van with no cowl on. Then disconnect the battery as it would only run for 3-4 seconds. When the battery was disconnected they put the cowl back on a plug in the connector. It would seem that by disconnecting the battery did the trick. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I have seen this so many times. The computer (ECM) does not need to be reset when doing plugs.


There is a resistor on the cowl that needs to be plugged in. It is on the passenger side on a 2011. It is a 2 wire. The fuel pump will only run in the start position if this is not plugged in.



I am sure 'stubborn1' tried to start the van with no cowl on. Then disconnect the battery as it would only run for 3-4 seconds. When the battery was disconnected they put the cowl back on a plug in the connector. It would seem that by disconnecting the battery did the trick. :wink:
Well, even a broken clock is right twice a day :wink:

You are right - I remember finding the wire disconnected to the resister on the cowl around the same time as playing with the battery. Glad to know what was the true cause of the issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Just my two cents - wait for a coupon at the dealer (I did mine at 125,000 miles), buy the OEM plugs on eBay from another authorized Toyota dealer for 1/2 the price, bring them to your local dealer and have them do the spark plug change and any other gaskets - should be $400 or less and you're good for another 100,000 miles or 10 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Most dealers aren't going to use customer-provided parts, even manufacturer ones, for a number of reasons. An independent shop is much more likely to go along with that.

And, honestly, what are you really saving? What's the dealer markup on spark plugs compared to what you're paying for the rest of the job? This job is almost entirely labor.

-Mike

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I am fortunate my local dealers for all of my different car brands will accept customer supplied parts. I agree, each dealer will differ.

1) Labor = $402.50 for spark plugs.
2) 6 of 90919-01247 spark plugs = dealer price = $99.60 or $16.60/each + tax - Online price ~$22 online for all 6 shipped, no tax.
3) 3 of 17176-0P021 = dealer price = $35.79 or $11.93/each - ~$22 online for all 3 shipped, no tax.

So for me with my tax rate it's about $100 savings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
I am fortunate my local dealers for all of my different car brands will accept customer supplied parts. I agree, each dealer will differ.
Its great that you have a dealer who is willing to use your supplied parts but Pl. note that with customer supplied parts, the work is not warrantied. That's the SOP with any shop, oem, or aftermarket. If anything goes wrong you have no recourse.

Since this is a sort of one time job, I would rather have the dealer supply the parts and have peace of mind
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Hondas will not run properly unless you use NGK Iridium plugs. I don't know who supplies the plugs for Toyota but if someone on here knows, please tell. Also: Toyota specifications demand that the plugs be Iridium--- don't use platinum or anything else. The Iridium run cooler and last longer as well. I know family members that have gotten 200,000 out of the original Sienna plugs with no problems. I myself would not wait that long but you cannot argue with success.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
heres a video that I saw and liked but it was just to labor intensive for me, I let the dealer do that job for me
heres a video that I saw and liked but it was just to labor intensive for me, I let the dealer do that job for me
heres a video that I saw and liked but it was just to labor intensive for me, I let the dealer do that job for me
For some reason I cannot get to the youtube video you are referencing - can you help me out? resend the link? Thanks! John [email protected]
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top