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They sell pumps for under $10 that screw onto a quart size bottle.

Plews 55001 Lubrimatic Fluid Quart Pump, Fits Standard Quart Bottles $6.89 on amazon
 

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Where is the red 6mm level check located? I am filling my transmission fluid and I released there is do dipstick, lol. What a fool I am.
 

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I read the thread again and watched the video. Never would have figured that red level stick out on my own. Thanks for the info guys!
 

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Could you have removed the transmission? Would one of the bolts prevented you from removing pan because it was blocked by the frame?
That difficult bolt on the trans pan can be easily accessed with a 1/4 drive ratchet extension and swivel on the 10 mm socket

First, pull the transmission mount nuts (mount is mushroom shaped) On our 2012 Sienna there are three - one is up top and the other two are underneath, hidden by two, thin plastic plugs in the cross member. Once the nuts are off, use a bottle jack to lift the differential until the mount bolts are almost through the subframe. Then you have access to the hard to reach pan bolt(s).
 

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Does anyone have the TXD, RXF, RXD, and MTH for the ScanGauge II X-Gauge transmission fluid temperature for the 2012 Sienna? I've tried about half of them from the website and none are giving a reading.

I was also trying to add engine oil temperature but it looks like the only provided code was for the Scion FRS/Subaru BRZ/Toyota 86. Any insight would be appreciated - Thanks in advance.
 

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There are tranny cooler lines that go into the bottom of the radiator and out the other side back to the tranny, so if you remove one of the clamps and pull the line off the radiator it will help you remove another pint or two.

As for the services intervals, I will be doing a drain and fill every 50,000 miles, which I am at soon, and drop the pan at every 100,000 miles. Fluid is cheap, transmissions aren't. Speaking of fluid you can use Toyota ATF WS $38 a gallon or Valvoline MaxLife Multi-Vehicle ATF $18 a gallon. This Valvoline does say its for Toyota WS and is approved by the dealer. You pick what's best for you.

To check the trans temp, ScanGauge2 will work.
 

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I did the full ATF exchange by dropping the pan and change the filter/strainer at 50k miles.
I use 14.5 bottle of ATF WS. The old fluid was really dark I did not see pink color until after the 12 bottle. I also saw a few small pieces of metal on my oil bucket. Van feels a little more smoother after this service. Will do it again at 100k miles.




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Discussion Starter #53
That difficult bolt on the trans pan can be easily accessed with a 1/4 drive ratchet extension and swivel on the 10 mm socket

First, pull the transmission mount nuts (mount is mushroom shaped) On our 2012 Sienna there are three - one is up top and the other two are underneath, hidden by two, thin plastic plugs in the cross member. Once the nuts are off, use a bottle jack to lift the differential until the mount bolts are almost through the subframe. Then you have access to the hard to reach pan bolt(s).
OP back for the 100k service and I'm going to drop the pan and replace the filter. I see the tranny mount (kind of hard to miss), and I see the 2 nuts hidden by the plastic covers, but you say the third is up top. I see a nut on top of the mount, but there is a 4th nut on the bottom of the mount (right by the 2 that were hidden in the cross member, but on the wheel side). It looks like the more obvious one to loosen, but your comment is making me second guess myself. Any chance you could show a pic of what you did?
 

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That difficult bolt on the trans pan can be easily accessed with a 1/4 drive ratchet extension and swivel on the 10 mm socket

First, pull the transmission mount nuts (mount is mushroom shaped) On our 2012 Sienna there are three - one is up top and the other two are underneath, hidden by two, thin plastic plugs in the cross member. Once the nuts are off, use a bottle jack to lift the differential until the mount bolts are almost through the subframe. Then you have access to the hard to reach pan bolt(s).

I pulled mine a couple nights ago and just used a 1/4" drive 10mm socket

https://www.siennachat.com/forum/67-problems-maintenance-repair-gen-3/60875-pulled-trans-pan-what-i-found.html

To gain access to the hard to reach bolt, I wrapped a large pry bar with a shop rag and pried the trans case away from the frame

The mounts have just enough flex to give you the room needed to get it out
 

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Discussion Starter #55
I ended up going the jack route. It was pretty simple really. Loosen the 3 Transmission mount bolts (2 are hidden under easily-removed plastic covers and 1 is just right there. I didn't take the nuts the full way off - just backed them off to the end, then jacked on the transmission housing. This gave relatively easy access to all of the pan bolts.

Definitely be thoughtful of where you jack - unfortunately, I was not thoughtful enough and part of the jack was underneath a portion of where the pan was, making it very difficult to get something to catch the fluid underneath and thus creating a bit of a mess to clean up.

I used the Beck Arnley filter/gasket set. I normally use Wix filters when I can, but it was pretty clear just by looking at the pics (and then reading the reviews) that the Wix filter spec'd for our vans is not the right part.

Magnets were definitely coated with fines, but really not as bad as I had expected for 100k miles.
 

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Just did my transmission flush this morning, pumping out 2 qts at a time and running 10 qts thru it. By the 8th qt the fluid was bright pink again. I Didnt have to lift the van. I didnt remove the drivers wheel either, I simply turned the wheels all the way left. Plenty of room to gain access to the refill plug. My drain pan fit with about 2-3” of room from the trans pan. One variation I made to this process was to add a magnefine filter in the hose going into the radiator cooler on the passenger side. These filters are wonderful at cleaning the clutch material and metal bits from the fluid. Without this filter, you are simply recirculating the metal particles thru the transmission ruining the trany as you drive. The pan filter is more or less a screen and a poor filter. The new magnfine filter has a steel body so placement by the exhaust is not a problem.

On my van, I monitored the trans temps while driving and it never got hotter than 180*F, so I opted not to install an Aux cooler. If you trailer with your van, it would be a good idea to take more time to add a cooler. I have installed at least 6 coolers to vehicles and I really like the trucool cooler with the bypass that compensates for atf temps. Buy 3/8” hose if you do. Most kits come with 11/32” hose which is too small.

If you choose to use non-oem pan filters, make sure it seats properly to the valve body. There have been incidents where it didnt seat and caused air to be sucked in causing cavitation and foaming of the fluid. The transmission fail to shift properly, ran dry. Best practice is to use OEM filters and seals.

44390
 

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Hi so how do you monitor the temperature of your transmission? Any tool I need to get?
There are several apps you can get. I have an iphone. I bought enginelink hd $9.00 in the app store and the bluetooth device on ebay called LeLink $35. You need to put in a custom PID for the trans temp.

Follow this link for the formula

Header: 7E1
PID: 2182
Formula: ((((A*256)+B)*(84/1000))-480)/12
Min: 0
Max: 300
Description: 2011 sienna trans temp
Units: *F
 

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They hide one of the pan bolts under the frame. Had to remove 3 engine mount nuts and jack up about 1.5" to remove the last bolt.
 

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The local Toyota Guys Say that you should not actually do a complete flush of your transmission, especially once you get to higher mileages. If regular services of it were not done as per Toyota Service Guidelines. The complete flush could wash the metal shavings from the clutch plates which actually have been helping your transmission to shift like sand paper alowing the plates to grip. If you wash these out you may end up with a transmission that slips when you get done.

They say the drain and fill is the best bet. Toyota actually advises against full flushes even thought the dealers try to up sell you one all the time.

Also, they said just get out what comes out. Don't be starting the engine and shifting it or jacking it up on weird levels or disconnecting hoses. This could cause you to get air in your torque converter and they said that's not a good thing. So just drain what comes out and replace that amount with fresh Toyota ATF WS. They also did mention most people wont have to worry about the Transmission filter for some time. You can change it but You mostly likely dont need to. If your ATF fluid looks really dirty and you have really high mileage maybe but they said you could probably go like 200k as long as you are draining and filling and you may actually never need to change it. The filter costs at least $100 on it's own that's not counting the pan gasket, O ring and the Crush Washers. They did say it was pretty easy to do just most likely unnecessary.

I just bought my 2013 Toyota Sienna AWD XLE. It has 130,000 on it and has been dealer serviced its entire life. I have dealer records for that entire time. But there is NO extended warranty even available so I will be doing all the service on it. The next oil change is due at 135,000. I'm lucky if I get 10,000 miles a year so I'm just going to plan on doing an oil change and a ATF drain and fill annually. I'll use the Toyota ATF WS but I'm thinking I'm going to go with Pennzoil Ultimate Platinum 0w20 and use a Royal Purple Filter.

Being how the service life is over for my vehicle ...meaning Toyota no long has scheduled maintenance intervals for my vehicle. I'm also thinking this year is a good time to Flush the Radiator, Change the hoses, Change the Serpentine Belt, do a fluid swap for the power steering, do a fluid swap for the Brakes and bleed fresh fluid through the lines, Change the front and rear transaxle gear oil and check the front spark plugs. I'm thinking if the plugs look ok and the engine continues to run well i will just check them. If they look like they need to be swapped then I will do that. But otherwise I will just plan to do that around 200k. perhaps continue to inspect them annually when I do the oil and atf service. The air filters look like they were just replaced there's not even any dust on them. I think this is the best I can do to set up for success with out being overly excessive. This is kind of but I'd rather do some preventative in the beginning. Everything else will just be as it comes. I will inspect the brakes when I do the fluid swap and bleed and replace if necessary. The brakes will also be inspected anually when I do the Oil & ATF service as I will also be rotating my tires at that time.
 
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