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Thanks for all the great info here.
I called my local dealer yesterday and made an appointment for this morning to get the line replaced. Toyota did not use a all metal line, but the rubber section was replaced with a new thicker section of tubing.
My van has 90k miles and I feel lucky that the hose didn't leak or have a catastrophic failure.
 

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Received my LSC (limited service campain) notice in the mail for my 08 sienna at the dealer today told them to save me the old part we will see
 

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Update : Dealer replaced the oil tube ,but could not give me the old one he said had to be returned to Toyota but he did say that it was pretty well worn and it was leaking ,however I did not see any evidence of it leaking oh well now I have piece of mind and it did not cost me any time except I have to clean everywhere where the mechanic touched.
 

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Hi the oil line went out last night on our 08 LE with 65K on the clock. Luckily we were close to home and were able to get it home ok. Spent all day today struggling to get the old line off. Right now I almost have the steering pump undone, if I can figure out the last step in doing so. I don't have a manual, and there is nothing to be found on the 'net instructing how to undo the damn steering pump. If anyone has climbed beneath their Sienna, then you realize there is precious little in space for tool as well as hands. The top of the line went easily, but the steering pump blocks any kind of tool access to the lower bolt. Ended up getting a new all metal line from Napa Auto parts, Dorman part number 917-023. Closest dealer to have one in stock was San Diego (I am in Northern California). Right now I gotta say this may be our last Toyota.....
 

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Thanks for the part number. It is selling for $21.49 and as noted it is aftermarket manufactured by Dorman. The Napa PN is BK 6005431. I have linked it below from the Napa website. I don't know if using this will void your warranty but if you have over 5yr/60K mi. I guess it may not matter. I am tempted to just buy this and change it myself since I have not had mine replaced under the limited service campain yet or buy it and see if I can work out a deal with the dealership to install it.

http://www.napaonline.com/Search/Detail.aspx?R=BK_6005431_0282422464#

Sejose, can you give anymore tips on how to remove the power steering pump?
 

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sejose said:
Job done, apparently no damage to the engine. Relief and I am happy we now have all metal VVTi feed lines.

Can I assume that you did not have the campaign done to replace it? Just curious, because if you did and it still failed I might want to look @ the Napa option. Thanks for the p/n info
 

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I did not bother with the dealer whatsoever, I was not interested in another rubber line. Where mine failed was at the clamps, they apparently wear through the rubber and allow a leak. What it took for me to get to the two bolts securing the steering pump was a breaker bar. The flexible head allowed me to not only get a socket on the bolts but also by angling the handle out I was able to get enough swing movement to break loose the bolt. You have to release the belt from the pump pulley first though. The tensioner is tucked up and to the right (toward the front of the engine) of the steering pump. A 14mm box end on the center of the tensioner turn counter clockwise to release the tension on the serpentine belt. After you get the two bolts out, the pump may not want to immediately come free. Rather than pry on aluminum, I used a 17mm socket on the banjo fitting for the pressure line and used that force to pull the pump away from its mount on the engine block. Hope that helps you guys, I am 51 years old and was able to get it done. Hard thing for me to say it may be our last Toyota, but that kind of penny pinching maneuver of using rubber line and also to take so long to take action doesn't sit well with me. Nice van and we love it, especially now.
 

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Also worth mentioning, even though our van lost 5 quarts of oil, at no time did the low oil warning light come on. We were completely blindsided by this sudden and complete oil loss, although as soon as I saw the oil all over the place I knew what had caused it.

This leaves me feeling empty regarding any admiration for Toyota the company.
 

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sejose said:
Also worth mentioning, even though our van lost 5 quarts of oil, at no time did the low oil warning light come on. We were completely blindsided by this sudden and complete oil loss, although as soon as I saw the oil all over the place I knew what had caused it.
In the manual for my 2004, the only oil-related indicator described is the "Low engine oil pressure warning light". As long as there is oil at the suction of the oil pump, pressure is maintained and there is no loss of pressure warn about. Here's part of what the 2004 manual says about this indicator:
The light may come on when the oil level is extremely low. It is not designed to indicate low oil level, and the oil level must be checked using the level dipstick.
It looks like sejose is expecting a low oil level indication; is that a feature of the later (2GR-FE equipped) Siennas?
 

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I would expect that while driving your $20K+ vehicle, if it suddenly loses 5 quarts of oil, some warning should be given. We just happened to pop the hood for another reason and saw oil all over the place. WOW! Toyota, do you even care to listen?

I am getting ready to buy a full size pickup. No Tundra for me, my money will go to Ford.
 

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sejose said:
I am getting ready to buy a full size pickup. No Tundra for me, my money will go to Ford.
As a Sienna owner I am intrigued by this idea that the entire Toyota product line should be condemned due to the lack of a single feature in a 2008 Sienna (an oil level warning), and as the owner to two far-from-ideal Fords I am interested in the implication that an F-150 would have no flaws. Accordingly, I downloaded a 2008 Ford F-150 owners manual, to find...

In the documentation of the instruments the oilcan symbol in the instrument display is described as "engine oil", with no indication of whether the monitored parameter is pressure, or level or both. The "check gauges" state of the mini message center indicates various conditions, including oil pressure, but not oil level; this is presumably the case because the vehicle has an oil pressure gauge, and not an oil level gauge - there could be warning lights for anything.

In the description of that oil presssure gauge, Ford says:
Indicates engine oil pressure. The needle should stay in the normal operating range (between “L” and “H”). If the needle falls below the normal range, stop the vehicle, turn off the engine and check the engine oil level. Add oil if needed. If the oil level is correct, have your vehicle checked by your authorized dealer.
Hmmm... it seems that the F-150 driver is expected to monitor the oil level without the assistance of an oil level warning, after all, since the level can get so low the oil pump starves (and thus loses output pressure) without the mention of any warning indication.

For confimation, I searched the manual for the word "level" and found that there is a "system check" features which covers various conditions including oil pressure, but not level. There are references to the level of windshield washer fluid and fuel (my Sienna tells me when either of those are low, but the F-150 only seems to have an indication for fuel). There is text message for low oil pressure, but not low oil level. There are remarks about low power steering fluid, clutch fluid, automatic transmission fluid, and transfer case oil levels, but no suggestion of a warning indication for any of them. The maintenance section described the use of the dipstick to check engine oil level, but does not mention any warning indication.

Well, I guess it's time to write off Ford as well and take the pickup truck shopping to one of the companies that went bankrupt and had to be saved by your tax dollars (GM and Chrysler)... maybe they will have the critical low engine oil level warning. ;)

I agree that a low engine oil level warning would be desirable. I just wouldn't buy an F-150 which doesn't have it instead of a Tundra which might not have it to spite Toyota for not putting it in a 2008 Sienna.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
I have not been on Sienna chat for some time and was amazed at how far this thread had gone. I apologize for not giving the recall number that was asked for earlier. I gave the letter to the service rep. and never got it back. I have no record of the number. And just to comment the new line was still a rubber / metal identical to the last except: I was ensured the rubber was a different compound than the original. This is my first Toyota, almost bought a Rav 4 last summer for the wife. But Subaru won, $5000 cheaper for similar options and insurance was $250 less per year. I have drove Ford, GM, VW before my Toyota. I am not seeing the Toyota edge. No issues with our Subaru Forester so far.
 

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This is what mine says:

"LSC 90K - Certain 2007 Through 2010 Model Year Sienna Vehicles VVT-i Oil Hose Replacement"

And another possible identifying number is: TOY002-TK1-104-000162494

Available until March 31, 2013

Got mine done, but haven't checked to see if it's still rubber or metal.
 

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sorry for reviving this old thread but when we got the carfax for the 2008 Limited that we just purchased, I wonder what was this oil line replacement that was posted there and now this all makes sense.

Thanks for all the information.
 

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I got the same problem with my 2008 Sienna! Got it fixed(?) in the garage. The mechanic installed the same piece of rubber hose. Mentioned to me that it going to brake in 6 months to 2 years period! I have expected to find some recalls of this problems, but Toyota is quiet. Even so many-many times this problem has happened with so many cars and different models: RAV4, Sienna, Camry. Buy Toyota and going to be ripped off! Looks like we have to forget about this non reliable for now brand! Toyota got our money and do not care any more!
 

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The mechanic installed the same piece of rubber hose.
If your mechanic followed the TSB, he shouldn't have replaced it with the same piece of rubber hose. The upgraded replacement rubber hose is of a different (stronger) rubber material and is also slightly thicker.

Mentioned to me that it going to brake in 6 months to 2 years period!
If so, your van would be the first. I've yet to hear of one instance of the upgraded replacement rubber hose failing.
 

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Sounds like he did not get it repaired at a Toyota dealer, has he called it a garage? Whoever he used put in whatever they had available. The proper replacement hose is constructed of material that is able to handle the pressure and hydrocarbon blowby gas resistant. While it would be nicer if we received the full metal line that the new engines are built with, I'm sure that this hybrid (metal-hose-metal) assembly will last.
 
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