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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just changed the passenger side rear hub assembly on my 2021 sienna at 97450 miles. really disappointed that it only lasted that long. visibly, everything else was clean and nearly rust free after just 11 months on the midwest(and a salty MN winter), but the hub itself was thick crusty rust, and clicked.

What a PITA to change too in the rear. you can't take the front trailing arm out without dropping the rear subframe by a bit, but if you remove the spring perch/lower control arm, and the upper control arm, the strut, and loosen the front trailing support, you can get just enough wiggle room to twist the hub carrier out enough to get the cv axle in enough to get to the hub bolts.

also, whoever decided that they need to use a staked axle nut instead of a convex washer is a moron, because mine was staked so far down that it wrecked my punch, and I could not get it far enough out to not chowder the threads on the end of the axle. good thing I only need the ones past it.

also, on that note, I really appreciate that its not a press in bearing.

also also, the factory shocks are toast, I can compress them with my noodle arms, and they take forever to spring back out. good thing I can only get shocks from the dealer because no one has aftermarket options yet. oh, and if anyone is wondering, the hub assemblies are currently dealer only, no aftermarket, and were $380 each. I wonder how long the others will last.

if anyone wants a description of the task, i can provide it, but I didn't take any pictures. also, i now have to visit the dealer to get them to reset the electronic parking brake system, because its integrated onto the brake caliper, and the van knows you unplugged it and doesn't like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Silly question but how do you put on 97K miles in a year?
less than a year. I do 100 to 110k per year, and yes, i run a delivery service, about 8000 miles per month. Took the van home from the dealership on June 2nd of 2021 with 263 miles on it. it goes about 2000 per week, and is exclusively used for work. it will be closer to 112000 by the end of the first year. and yes, other than the wheel bearings and fluid changes, nothing else has gone wrong. the hybrid battery still has lots of life left, and will likely last forever like this, because this is what NiMH batteries do best, and its being driven daily. my old cargo van is still sitting out front of my house on standby, it made it to 468000 before i decided i could not afford to drive it anymore, and my route downsized too.
 

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less than a year. I do 100 to 110k per year, and yes, i run a delivery service, about 8000 miles per month. Took the van home from the dealership on June 2nd of 2021 with 263 miles on it. it goes about 2000 per week, and is exclusively used for work. it will be closer to 112000 by the end of the first year. and yes, other than the wheel bearings and fluid changes, nothing else has gone wrong. the hybrid battery still has lots of life left, and will likely last forever like this, because this is what NiMH batteries do best, and its being driven daily. my old cargo van is still sitting out front of my house on standby, it made it to 468000 before i decided i could not afford to drive it anymore, and my route downsized too.
There's 2 tundras that hit a million mile. They we're also used for delivery service.
 

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Hey, that's something to look forward to LOL! I am at 37K, and I have already had a few boo-boos that one usually doesn't expect until 100K, like the rear left-hand door failing to close when parked on a hill, the pedestrian warning sound generator becoming barely audible, the cable that control the sliding function on the 2nd row bench falling apart and then taking weeks to replace.

The loudness of head scratching noise intensifies
 

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Chubbysumo. Is yours FWD or AWD? I think the rear hubs might be different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Chubbysumo. Is yours FWD or AWD? I think the rear hubs might be different.
AWD, and from what I can tell, they use the exact same bearing, the rear hubs for the FWD just have a slug and bolt that does thru to compress the bearing. A quick check on the part crossreference shows that they are indeed used on the rear of the FWD and AWD models.

Do you go to undercarriage car washes? I try to do that after I drive over the passes hoping to rinse off the salt.

yes, the carwash I use has undercarriage sprayers, and I have a monthly subscription so I use it nearly every day. Also, once a month I take it to a self serve wash place and spray out under it. literally the only thing that was rusty was the hub assembly. looks like it had been on there for 10 years. the rest was still clean and rust free. light rust on the bolts and nuts, which would be expected, but the factory color coding paint on the bolts and nuts had not even worn off yet. the threads to the CV axle were rusted near solid, and I had to take a wire wheel and carefully clean them out. I coated it with grease before I put it back, but the threads were wrecked because of the moron who staked the nut staked it so deep it deformed the nut and made it impossible to return to round, so it chewed the threads on the way out. there were enough threads left in there past that to make it seat and get it to 217 ft pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Disappointing to hear this as I did my CV axle at 180k on my other car. Too bad you didn't get to do a video on this, probably too busy cursing at it. :LOL:
yes, I was cursing whoever decided to mangle the nut stake so hard that it ovaled the nut, along with the fact that I had to disassemble nearly the entire rear suspension to get to the hub bolts because the cv axle can't push back in far enough to give clear access to the bolts without damaging the CV boot, and now I have a clunk/bang every once inawhile because I can't torque things down once they are on the ground because there is just no way to do it, so I had to torque it the air, and thus, its "preload" is wrong on the bushings. also sad that the OEM shock is dead, like completely dead, like, my noodle arms could press it in, and then it took nearly 25 minutes to fully extend.
 

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yes, I was cursing whoever decided to mangle the nut stake so hard that it ovaled the nut, along with the fact that I had to disassemble nearly the entire rear suspension to get to the hub bolts because the cv axle can't push back in far enough to give clear access to the bolts without damaging the CV boot, and now I have a clunk/bang every once inawhile because I can't torque things down once they are on the ground because there is just no way to do it, so I had to torque it the air, and thus, its "preload" is wrong on the bushings. also sad that the OEM shock is dead, like completely dead, like, my noodle arms could press it in, and then it took nearly 25 minutes to fully extend.
Shouldn't this be under warranty ?
 

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yes, I was cursing whoever decided to mangle the nut stake so hard that it ovaled the nut, along with the fact that I had to disassemble nearly the entire rear suspension to get to the hub bolts because the cv axle can't push back in far enough to give clear access to the bolts without damaging the CV boot, and now I have a clunk/bang every once inawhile because I can't torque things down once they are on the ground because there is just no way to do it, so I had to torque it the air, and thus, its "preload" is wrong on the bushings. also sad that the OEM shock is dead, like completely dead, like, my noodle arms could press it in, and then it took nearly 25 minutes to fully extend.
After reading your description I cannot imagine doing this job myself. Disassemble rear suspension just to do this... :rolleyes: Reminds me of taking out the engine to replace spark plugs.

Do you think the shocks are dead due to towing all the time? Would it help to get aftermarket?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
After reading your description I cannot imagine doing this job myself. Disassemble rear suspension just to do this... :rolleyes: Reminds me of taking out the engine to replace spark plugs.

Do you think the shocks are dead due to towing all the time? Would it help to get aftermarket?
The spark plug thing, yea, I have plenty of memories of doing a ford Vulcan v6 back 3 blind with 3 different flex joints. also, any mid to late 2000's chrysler product with a V6 literally never got rear spark plugs, because to get to them you have to drop the engine and front subframe and remove the intake. im no stranger to stupid bean counter choices, nor doing work like this. I have been doing all my own work for years, especially running a delivery service, it helps save on money being spent on repairs a lot.

as far as the disassembly goes, its not the worst, but its not the best. A little thought into how close the hub bolts are to the CV shaft, or how the electronic parking brake module mounted could have easily saved me 30 minutes.

and no, I don't think they wore out because I tow all the time. I keep my tongue weight down to under 250 pounds, and I never let the rear sag too low because I have airlift bags in the rear to stop that sagging. they just wore out from use. I suspect that its just a parts quality issue due to the manufacturing time frame, and the fact that I don't think the engineers ever had "loaded every day with near maximum GVWR in mind when they chose the shocks. I would put after market on there, but parts availability is just not great right now. the only place I could find the hub assembly outside of rockauto(for a questionable part) was the dealer with an OEM part. the OEM shocks aren't bad priced, only $35 each, but still, the fact that they didn't make it even 100k does not bode well for long term owners or second hand owners a few years down the road. I would also like to note, despite the shock being completely blown and having no "shock absorbing" capability, it does not bounce. the anti-roll bar plus the bushings is enough to stop the bouncing for now. I ordered a set of rear shocks at the dealer and will be putting them in a couple weeks when I get time.
 

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Have you been towing something heavy?
I frequently pull a 12’ enclosed box trailer and a 5x10’ utility trailer loaded with lawn maintenance equipment with it, including about 200 miles or half of the tank in question. High single digits is the norm when towing. Even when not towing I’m lucky to get north of 12 or 13mpg — 2” lift and 33” A/T tires, toolbox + bed cover on the back, plus the aerodynamics of a brick.
 

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Do you go to undercarriage car washes? I try to do that after I drive over the passes hoping to rinse off the salt.
Really doesn't matter. Salt isn't what caused his issue. It's been 1 year. Actually they may have washed it too much and stored it in a humid garage causing the issue.


just changed the passenger side rear hub assembly on my 2021 sienna at 97450 miles. really disappointed that it only lasted that long. visibly, everything else was clean and nearly rust free after just 11 months on the midwest(and a salty MN winter), but the hub itself was thick crusty rust, and clicked.
Of course everything is pretty clean, it's been 1 year 🤣

Honestly your situation is an anomaly for the rest of us. 100k a year is absolutely insane. I hope you run the math for whatever delivery service your doing as it looks like you'll get 2-3 years before you need a new van. Or $15k a year in vehicle expenses. (Tires, oil changes, maintenance, etc.)
 

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Man, I thought 18,600 miles on a 7 month old car was a lot. I do rideshare on the side and the van is used only for rideshare. If this was my only car, it would have almost 25k already. Either way, Toyotas ain't what they used to be. My 2010 cost me $8500 in 18 months and tried me for another $2500 before I gave up, so I extended my bumper-bumper warranty to 5 years/150,000 miles. Powertrain is lifetime, standard from the dealer.

I do not work on my own things because 1) I suck at it. I cross thread everything. 2) I lack the tools 3) I'm about as patient as a German Shepherd who just cornered an intruder. 4) I suck at it. Was unable to drain out a radiator petcock and do my own coolant flush. 5) I don't have much time in my busy life. 6) Everyone who has knowledge refuses to teach me. 7) I suck at it. Lots of broken bolts.

The dealer will have a fun time replacing my shocks and bearings under warranty, and after warranty is up; they will be left to make as much racket as they want until the van gets traded if I don't like the price.

As far as parts go, that bearing only made it one year. How much worse could aftermarket be if original equipment is THAT bad. Just a thought. Perhaps it is a fluke. First model year and maybe whoever installed it at the factory wasn't properly trained. I deliberately waited for a 2022 to hopefully bypass these types of production "kinks".
 
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