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2020 Sienna Limited Premium from a 2002 Odyssey XLE
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Discussion Starter #1
We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
 

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2020 Predawn Mica Gray Limited
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It sounds like waiting for the 2021 would be a better decision.

You don’t drive many miles and the vast majority of those miles are in the city. The current sienna is rated for 19MPG (city) and I can verify it gets about 16MPG in city driving. The new sienna is rated for 33MPG combined meaning highway will likely be around 28-30MPG and city will be closer to 35MPG.

I think the pricing will be similar to the 2020s with the exception of the mega high end platinum model. If you won’t be purchasing that model I think it’s a wash and the fact that the hybrid is available on every trim is a big plus.

space is very similar (someone correct me if I am wrong) and the Sienna already had the Odyssey best in interior room to begin with so you should only be gaining room over your current van.

.9% is a good rate but I think you should be able to get a decent rate on a 2021.

acceleration is a priority but only 10% on your driving if highway so that means that a only small portion (merging onto the highway) of only 10% of your driving is important. I think the 2.5 hybrid Powertrain will have enough pep to get you where you need to go without any issues. If it isn’t as much as you would like, it’s still only a small portion of your driving where you would even notice.

sorry for any typos, writing on an iPhone
 

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Wait and see. Owning the latest model vs a ten year old model has some value. Even if it's only superficial. How long a wait are we talking here? A month or two? Decide in haste regret in leisure.
Not to mention, the 2020s will probably go on clearance, if you still want it.
 

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We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
The main reason I would not get a last generation Sienna is that the design currently is very old introduced in 2011. The safety of that vehicle is no where near its competitors and the 2021 Sienna is going to be far safer and much more modern and fuel efficient. Attached are IIHS results for the passenger side. Personally if I was buying today I would get a 2020/2021 Honda Odyssey followed by a 2020/2021 Pacifica. I plan to wait until this Fall to get the 2021 Sienna. If I was buying early next year I'd also consider the 2022 Kia Sedona, but it won't have AWD or Hybrid engine.

If you must have second row removable seats then the 2021 Toyota Sienna wouldn't work, but the storage otherwise looks similar. The current Sienna 0-60 is around 7 seconds. Looking at the 2020 Highlander Hybrid which the 2021 Sienna will share is 8 seconds, so likely 2021 Sienna will be between 8-9 seconds. Both my current vehicles are slower that so doesn't bother me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for the very helpful replies, good points all. Subject to change without notice, we've decided to wait and review the 2021 Siennas in person, before we purchase a Sienna (2020 or 21). I just hope nothing expensive happens to our 2002 Odyssey before then.

Regards to all and thanks to Siennachat.com,

Bob
 

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I guess you decided, but I would stick with a 2020. The second row was already terribly designed on Siennas, with the miniature middle seat and the runners remaining in the floor after seat removal. So, if they won't even be removable that is a deal killer to me. The only reason to buy a minivan is the utility (speaks to your #2). Removing the second row results in a suburban man's cargo van.

Also, reliability is the other consideration.Seems like the current model has been good. Our 2015 has. I wouldn't trust a 1st year new model.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
jimmd, good points all. It's hard to speculate on the reliability of the 2021s. I guess it's all a crap shoot.
 

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We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
I read a couple articles on the 2021 Sienna, and was disappointed. Personally I think the 4 banger is too small for a car as heavy as the Sienna. If Toyota just HAS to use a four cylinder, make it bigger. Hybrid cars are more expensive to repair as well. It may be a good idea for some, but not me. The 2020 will be my last Sienna unless Toyota changes their format. Also if they move the cruise from that lil stalk on the right to buttons on the steering wheel, I'm DONE! (Best cruise ever.)
 

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I read a couple articles on the 2021 Sienna, and was disappointed. Personally I think the 4 banger is too small for a car as heavy as the Sienna. If Toyota just HAS to use a four cylinder, make it bigger. Hybrid cars are more expensive to repair as well. It may be a good idea for some, but not me. The 2020 will be my last Sienna unless Toyota changes their format. Also if they move the cruise from that lil stalk on the right to buttons on the steering wheel, I'm DONE! (Best cruise ever.)
Toyota hybrid vehicles have been extraordinarily reliable. Our 2012 Prius v wagon has not required a single repair since we bought it new. Toyota hybrids are quite peppy off the line due to the combined torque of the electric motors and the ICE. If I'm not careful, I can easily spin the tires of our Prius when taking off from a stop. Wanna drag race our Prius? :giggle:

I've rented Toyota with the cruise control buttons on the steering wheel and liked the new button format. The new button format seemed as easy to use as the stalk.

The only reason to buy a minivan is the utility (speaks to your #2). Removing the second row results in a suburban man's cargo van.
It depends on what you mean by "utility". We and most people I know who have bought minivans got them so they can carry more people and their stuff than possible in 2-row vehicles. I never thought about using our Sienna as a cargo van when I bought it. The cargo vans we've rented had far greater load carrying capability and were much easier to load due to their high roofs and larger door openings. Being able to carry some surprisingly large and heavy items behind the Sienna's 2nd row has been a bonus - like yesterday's incoming wine shipment. Woohoo!

Wine shipment 2020-08-26 in Sienna.jpg

I've had a 4'x8' utility trailer for almost 40 years. It's infinitely better for carrying "rough" cargo (e.g. building materials) than our Sienna. If I didn't have my trailer and needed one, I would rent a similar size Uhaul trailer which is only $14.95/day.
 

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lol. You can't compare a Prius with a Sienna in terms of power. Imagine this scenario, a fully loaded Sienna (6 passengers and their luggage), going up a mountain at high altitude. You think a 4 banger will be enough? What I love about the Sienna and any minivan is that they make great road trip cars. But being underpowered on our highways, that's a safety concern. Bring on the V6 option!
 

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lol. You can't compare a Prius with a Sienna in terms of power. Imagine this scenario, a fully loaded Sienna (6 passengers and their luggage), going up a mountain at high altitude. You think a 4 banger will be enough? What I love about the Sienna and any minivan is that they make great road trip cars. But being underpowered on our highways, that's a safety concern. Bring on the V6 option!
Aren't you getting a little worked up about this without personally experiencing how the 2021 Sienna hybrid performs? What does your negative speculation accomplish? If you don't like the Sienna hybrid after driving one then you can buy something else. Or go ahead and buy something else since you're certain that the Sienna hybrid isn't for you.
 

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It depends on what you mean by "utility".
I mean people carrying and stuff carrying with the ability to handle more of one or the other depending on the need at the time. Of course not a real cargo van, but with the 2nd row removed we have hauled a lot.
 

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Aren't you getting a little worked up about this without personally experiencing how the 2021 Sienna hybrid performs? What does your negative speculation accomplish? If you don't like the Sienna hybrid after driving one then you can buy something else. Or go ahead and buy something else since you're certain that the Sienna hybrid isn't for you.
Cancel culture has permeated sienna chat.
 

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Cool! I didn't know that "promoting rational thinking, decision making and behavior" was called that. Thanks!
This is an example of what's wrong with the good ole USA, anyone who disagrees with your point of view is now irrational. lol. Forums like this is a place to talk about topics both good and bad. If we only talk about the good stuff, then it would be just a brochure from Toyota.
 

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This is an example of what's wrong with the good ole USA, anyone who disagrees with your point of view is now irrational. lol. Forums like this is a place to talk about topics both good and bad. If we only talk about the good stuff, then it would be just a brochure from Toyota.
It has nothing to do with my "point of view". It's about your speculation about the safety of the 2021 Sienna which has nothing to do with facts.

Sure, let's talk about the good and bad but let's base the conversation on reality, personal experience, facts, data. That's the scientist in me talking. In the work world from which I retired, decisions based on speculation led to very poor outcomes but, fortunately, were usually caught by peer review.
 

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We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
Whatever you do- make sure to check the third row seats when folded down. Our 2013 folds down with a flush floor with no gaps. Our 2020 does not do the same leaving a 3 inch gap in the floor when they are folded down. I have complained to Toyota and they have no fix. I provided pictures of both vehicles to prove my point about the messed up feature and still did not get satisfaction.
 

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Whatever you do- make sure to check the third row seats when folded down. Our 2013 folds down with a flush floor with no gaps. Our 2020 does not do the same leaving a 3 inch gap in the floor when they are folded down. I have complained to Toyota and they have no fix. I provided pictures of both vehicles to prove my point about the messed up feature and still did not get satisfaction.
The attached picture gives a good view of the cargo area and with the second row seat pushed forward against the first.

It appears there may be a gap and also a carpet flap. Does a cargo tray mat in the 2020 fix this or you think would fix it in the 2021?
 

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It appears there may be a gap and also a carpet flap. Does a cargo tray mat in the 2020 fix this or you think would fix it in the 2021?
Cargo tray mats typically just cover the area directly over the third row, so I would say no.

It is hard to tell from the pictures available at this time of the 2021 model. I am thinking it will just be a short wait until we can actually see some reviews of production 2021s.
 
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We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.
A few thoughts from my perspective:

- I don't think the new 2021s will demand much of a price premium over the current models unless you are looking for the highest level trim (a Platinum with all the gadgets).

1) Since you mostly drive around town, a hybrid vehicle could be a great choice.

2) From the pre-production models, it still looks like the Sienna has ample storage space. When specs are released, you can compare directly.

3) I would not be too worried about financing rates. I am thinking they will continue to offer good financing as interest rates remain historically low. Different than SUVs, I don't expect a new Sienna to drive a huge market shift to buy a minivan (cause a shortage of minivans).

4) Calculate what you would be spending on a new car (down payment and monthly payments), compare that to what your repair costs have been for the Odyssey in the last year. If you can keep your old car running for a few more months, you will then have three options: keep your current car, purchase a leftover 2020, or purchase the new 2021.

5) The current V6 is very responsive. We will need to wait to see reviews of production 2021 Siennas before judging if the hybrid can offer the same level of responsiveness.
 
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