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We are planning to use the Siena as a camping vehicle. No need to sit 7 or 8 passengers. Only needs to seat just the 2 of us. The non-removeable 2nd row seats was the deal killer for the 2021. So was no point in waiting for it. Purchased a new 2020 instead. On the 64 mile trip from the dealer to home, 33.7 MPG for the 2020 XLE. Not a very big sample but was pleasantly surprised it was that good.
 

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We are planning to use the Siena as a camping vehicle. No need to sit 7 or 8 passengers. Only needs to seat just the 2 of us. The non-removeable 2nd row seats was the deal killer for the 2021. So was no point in waiting for it. Purchased a new 2020 instead. On the 64 mile trip from the dealer to home, 33.7 MPG for the 2020 XLE. Not a very big sample but was pleasantly surprised it was that good.
Congrats on the new 2020, it will probably be a super reliable vehicle. We know the 2nd row on the 2021 isn't designed to be easily removable and then easily replaced, but I'd be willing to bet that for those that are doing a small RV conversion or that want to permanently or semi-permanently remove the seats there will be a way to do it. I mean they have to bolt the seats in some how. If people unbolt them on their own and something happens Toyota can shrug and say the vehicle wasn't designed to. Probably won't be very easy to do or replace, we'll see.
 

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Congrats on the new 2020, it will probably be a super reliable vehicle. We know the 2nd row on the 2021 isn't designed to be easily removable and then easily replaced, but I'd be willing to bet that for those that are doing a small RV conversion or that want to permanently or semi-permanently remove the seats there will be a way to do it. I mean they have to bolt the seats in some how. If people unbolt them on their own and something happens Toyota can shrug and say the vehicle wasn't designed to. Probably won't be very easy to do or replace, we'll see.
The reason that Toyota gives for the 2nd rows row seats not being removeable is that they built in side air bags. Accidental deployment of an air bag can result in serious injury. If someone really wants to remove them them I would suggest they contact Toyota service or qualified body shop. The other issue would be safely storing the the removed seats with air bags.
 

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take it from someone who owns. A 2020 Toyota Highlander hybrid. The hybrid system in this truck moves it with authority going up hills. There is no lag whatsoever in passing situations, climbing long hills on interstates, or having to punch it to get around annoying drivers trying to prevent you from getting in their lane. (I drive in new York). Those electric motors produce more torque in the low end then any V6 powered vehicle I have owned and that is the key to it feeling powerful. Trust me, you dont miss that extra 40hp your missing. Although Toyota does not release torque numbers on the hybrid system, most reviewers state it has over 300ft pounds. the 3.5 V6 only has 262 ftlbs

I has a 2017 Sienna that I traded in for this highlander. That van could not get out of its own way unless I put it close to the floor due to that awful preforming 8 speed.

as far as Toyota hybrid systems, I have had them since my first 2007 Prius. That car went 250k and it needed nothing but basic stuff like oil changes, tires, filters and one set of brakes. I cant say nothing bad about there hybrid systems at all.
 

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We have had a 2007 Prius along with a Chevy Bolt which we have as our primary vehicle. There is no question that we would have preferred a hybrid to a straight gas vehicle. We have had our 2020 Sienna now for 2 weeks. We are getting 33 MPG without AC and 31 MPG without AC on. We were expecting worse gas performance. I think the real question knowing why you need the Sienna. If it is hauling more than 2 people around then waiting for the 2021 hybrid makes sense. If it is just 2 people (like us) using it as a low end RV then the irremovable 2nd row seating just doesn't work and the 2020 makes more sense.
 

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We've been testing the 2020 Siennas and are quite impressed. We want a new Sienna, it will likely be the last new car we buy. Trying to decide if its really worth waiting for the 2021 hybrid. How much more costly do you think the 2021s will be over the 2020 models?

Some factors:
1. We drive less than 10,000 miles a year, mostly in town and on the interstate less than 10% of our driving.
2. Don't want to lose any interior space in the back.
3. Can get 0.9% financing on a 2020 model.
4. We have a 2002 Odyssey to trade-in or sell outright. We are tired of putting money into it for repairs.
5. When I drive on the interstate, acceleration for merging is very important. It appears that the 2021 will not be as responsive as the V6 package.

Thank you for any thoughts, ideas, or suggestions.

Bob
I'm sorry but I think this hybrid will be the demise of the Sienna. I think Toyota will wind up eating a bunch of these. This is still a large heavy car. In a vehicle this size performance is paramount. Especially in passing, and being able to hold its own on a mountain road. Toyota offers a hybrid drivetrain as an option in several other models. They really should have done the same for the Sienna. I could stomach the new front end if they still had a decent V6 version. I hate to see Toyota pull such a boner. It is going to limit the market for Toyota minivans. My only option is to look to Honda. Too bad, I really liked the Sienna.
 

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I'm sorry but I think this hybrid will be the demise of the Sienna. I think Toyota will wind up eating a bunch of these. This is still a large heavy car. In a vehicle this size performance is paramount. Especially in passing, and being able to hold its own on a mountain road. Toyota offers a hybrid drivetrain as an option in several other models. They really should have done the same for the Sienna. I could stomach the new front end if they still had a decent V6 version. I hate to see Toyota pull such a boner. It is going to limit the market for Toyota minivans. My only option is to look to Honda. Too bad, I really liked the Sienna.
Maybe it’s just me but 245 hp seems adequate to me. Old 2006 Siennas had 215 hp and as late as 2017 Odyssey has 248 hp. Electric motors put down instant torque. We will see on October 27th driving impressions, my guess is it will be more than adequate just like the Highlander Hybrid.
 

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I'm sorry but I think this hybrid will be the demise of the Sienna. I think Toyota will wind up eating a bunch of these. This is still a large heavy car. In a vehicle this size performance is paramount. Especially in passing, and being able to hold its own on a mountain road. Toyota offers a hybrid drivetrain as an option in several other models. They really should have done the same for the Sienna. I could stomach the new front end if they still had a decent V6 version. I hate to see Toyota pull such a boner. It is going to limit the market for Toyota minivans. My only option is to look to Honda. Too bad, I really liked the Sienna.
Again I have had the v6 sienna and it does not compare to the hybrid power train in the 2020 highlander that I own. The highlander feels more powerful off the line as well as passing on the highway. I have put over 3700 miles of mixed driving and have never gotten lower then 38mpg.
FYI I have driven this SUV both up and down 9w here in southern NY which is a mountain road and it did not struggle one bit. My 2017 was constantly hunting for gears and then would suge. This was with the v6
 

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Too bad the current competition doesn’t have those low HP. We aren’t in 2006 nor 2017. Maybe you want yesterdays ways but a lot of us would rather live today, where even Camrys and Accords have close to 300hp.
 

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Ok the 2020 Honda Accord has 252 hp in the 2.0t version with 273ftlbs of torque. That is 50hp off from 300 hp. It also has a 10 speed automatic transmission.
 

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The 2021 Honda Odessy has 280 hp with zf 9 speed. So the highlander/sienna hybrid is not that far off. If you still insist on the v6 go test drive the Honda, and then come back to test drive the sienna. You will see the difference.
Most Chevy products, Ford products are now coming with turbo 4 engines instead of v6. These are just as heavy as the sienna and all contain about the same hp numbers.
The other factor is the torque numbers. As I have said before any 4300lb plus car that gives me 7 second 0-60 times, I will take it any day of the week.
 

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Too bad the current competition doesn’t have those low HP. We aren’t in 2006 nor 2017. Maybe you want yesterdays ways but a lot of us would rather live today, where even Camrys and Accords have close to 300hp.
Camrys and Accords with the V6 do not make up the majority of their sales and I would be willing to bet the 208 hp Camry Hybrid and the 212 hp Accord Hybrid outsells the V6 in both of their lineups.
I recently purchased a 2020 Sonata Hybrid that’s only 192hp and I’m completely fine with it’s power and it’s rated at 52 mpg. I plan on purchasing 2021 Sienna as soon as it hits the lots and I’ll probably be fine with the power in that as well and would prefer getting 36 mpg vs the Odyssey’s 22 mpg.
 

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Toyota already offered a 4 cylinder Sienna in the current gen, it had such dismal sales that they quickly dropped it. Now they won't offer the V6 as an option. Hmmm. Probably because they know that the 4 would have dismal sales as well if given the choice of a cheaper V6.
 

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Toyota already offered a 4 cylinder Sienna in the current gen, it had such dismal sales that they quickly dropped it. Now they won't offer the V6 as an option. Hmmm. Probably because they know that the 4 would have dismal sales as well if given the choice of a cheaper V6.
yes that 4 cylinder was the older 2.7l and it got about the same fuel economy as the v6 model, so people naturally went up to the v6.
The number to watch is the torque value. The 4cyl combined with the electric motors gives more torque then the current gen v6 and doubles the fuel economy on a 4300lb van...
it’s kind of like the fox body Mustang. It only had 200 hp but 330ftlbs of torque which is what made it so potent on the streets along with its light weight
 

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Toyota already offered a 4 cylinder Sienna in the current gen, it had such dismal sales that they quickly dropped it. Now they won't offer the V6 as an option. Hmmm. Probably because they know that the 4 would have dismal sales as well if given the choice of a cheaper V6.
Now the 2012 Sienna with the 2.7l 187hp and 0-60 in around 10 seconds, yea I would say is sluggish and would agree most people would not be fine with that and probably why they axed it.

I’d also agree that had they offered a V6 in this 4th gen alongside the 4cylinder Hybrid they would likely sell a good chunk, and a possibility more V6 depending on mpg of the V6 and price between the two, since a van is different than a v6 sedan. I think they didn’t do this primarily cause of future emissions and vans being a small market decided they don’t want V6 van segment dragging down their Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) numbers.

Keep your eye out on Oct 27th for Alex on Autos (YouTube) review. The embargo to give driving impressions is lifted then, however, he’s already kinda hinted what to expect and that’s the 2020 Highlander Hybrid.
 

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Toyota already offered a 4 cylinder Sienna in the current gen, it had such dismal sales that they quickly dropped it. Now they won't offer the V6 as an option. Hmmm. Probably because they know that the 4 would have dismal sales as well if given the choice of a cheaper V6.
Toyota is on a path towards “electrifying“ their entire lineup by 2025. Those that are not happy with that direction do have other options (Honda and Kia).

I am thinking there will be many happy with the increased fuel economy that the new Sienna offers. I guess the final test will be the results (sales figures).

 
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