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2018 Sienna LE
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Mine 2008 Sienna FWD LE 16,500mi 2/32 front & 3/32 rear Michelin Energy almost not pass the inspections Last Dec 2011. Looking forward for a better and cheaper tires....any idea?
Take it to an authorized Michelin dealer. They will give you a big discount on another set of Michelins.
I remember that I had done that and finally got my Hydroedge tires for $350 including taxes.
I took it to Discount Tire/America's Tire Co
 

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Have any one try plus zero on 215/65R16?
I have no idea what that means. "Plus 1", "plus 2", and so on mean maintaining overall dimensions while going one (or two, etc) inches larger in wheel size. "Plus zero" would mean what... using the stock size (which is indeed 215/65R16 for the second generation 2WD CE and LE). If the van came with 225/60R17, then going to 215/65R16 would be "minus one". If you're thinking the taller sidewall will help, I see the logic, but I don't think we are finding that as owners.

...or use speed rating H instead of T?

because I have heard some people said that might help. Any idea?
I don't expect that a higher speed rating would help, unless the tires are running really hot in the sidewall... in which case I would ensure that the UTQG rating includes "A" for "temperature".

A more useful rating might be Extra Load ("XL" on the end of the designation, e.g. 215/65R16 XL), but even then that only addresses load capacity, not wear rate. I have used XL tires in winter, all-season, and now winter type again and I have not experienced particularly good wear.


The Sienna is just relatively heavy - and top-heavy, and front-heavy - for the stock second-generation tire size. Smaller SUVs routinely use much bigger tires (for appearance), lighter sport sedans use wider tires of similar diameter, and all of those vehicles tilt the average in the longer direction. I doubt that many Siennas reach the tire manufacturer's expected treadwear life, because that manufacturer is expecting that tire to have an easier life than it has on the Sienna.
 

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I suppose I am lucky - I have 45,000 miles on OEM Bridgestones B380 (despite the rather dismal thread-wear rating of 240) and there is still some rubber left on them.
 

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The OEM's were Bridgestones, then 2 sets of Goodyears which WalMart refused to sell me a wearout warrenty because the first set didn't make 20K miles, then a set of Pirelli's which got a little over 1/2 it ratings, & now have Michelins. I highly suggest paying the extra $$ for the wearout warrenty, this is the only vehicle that I've had tires warrenty claim on premature wearout. My local Discount Tire is excellent on their customer service on this issue. I have a 2004 with a 150K miles original owner, & other than tires, brakes. & oil changes, I've put less then 1K $ in repair cost over the life time of this van.
 

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My 2 Yokohama Avid TRZ will need to be replaced soon, just over 52k miles.
I had up sized to 235/60/16, and run 40 psi all around, this is my work vehicle and it is heavily loaded.

2 of my tires are Michelin Hydroedge, they seem to be wearing well.
 

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Re: My Sienna slowly Eats Tires??

My 2004 Sienna wore out the factory tires in 22,000 miles and dealer said "normal", offered a prorate on replacements!
Instead we bought expensive Michelins, those wore out in 47,000 miles. While they performed much better they lasted about 1/2 their advertised 80K thread wear life. At 69,000 miles (22 +47) we bought at Sam's Club a set of BFGoodrich Touring TA P22560R16 97T M&S tires rated Theadware 640 Traction A Temperature B. Those were advertised for 65K miles. Well, they've performed great and van has 127,000 miles and tires are still good, thread wear indicators not yet reached with 57K miles of service, last rotation we were told we should get another 15K to 20K miles. Same driving style, same tire rotation, pressure (35PSI) etc. but dramatically improved performance.
SO, it does matter what brand and quality of tires are used, and keeping them properly inflated and rotated.
We plan to replace these with same again!
Jay
 

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Re: My Sienna slowly Eats Tires??

Bought a set of four Michelin Hydroedges and they lasted about 50K miles with a lot of wear on the outside edge of the tires. Rotated them every 7-8k miles and kept the psi @ 36. Just replaced them with four new Hydroedges and plan on rotating every 5-6K miles and psi around 40. The tires do run a little rough but my old mechanic recommended running them a little higher psi to get better mileage and longer life out of these tires.
 

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Just put new shoes on my 2011 Toyota Sienna XLE. The Dealer had Michelin Primacy MXv4's on it P235/60R17. At 27,000 they were at the tread indicators with rotations at every 5K. Ran them much past their safe point. The front's were basically slicks at 34,500. Went with a set of Uniroyal Tiger Paw Touring DT's in same size. Not bad at 106$ ea total bill with disposal and tax at 474.00. Not happy about the wear of tires and brake on the car. The gas millage was 18mpg with the Primacy's... Dealer told us the Sienna eats tires due to it's weight and the camber used...

Heard good things about the Uniroyals even if it is a Mast family product.... 80K tire here's hoping for 40k!!!
 

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same here...i am absolutely fastidious about tire rotation, alignment and tire pressure at 40psi. still eats tires like the beasts from district nine. same goes for brakes, as others have said.
40psi?? Really? The book calls for 35psi for most tires on a Sienna LE. What kind of tires are you using? I'd expect you to wear out the middles first, at 40psi!
 

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same here...i am absolutely fastidious about tire rotation, alignment and tire pressure at 40psi. still eats tires like the beasts from district nine. same goes for brakes, as others have said.
Do the math: 2 adults + 2 kids = 2-1/2 tons. Equivalent tires on a 2500-3000 lb car will of course go further.
I, on the other hand, NEVER rotate tires (LF,RF, LR & RR are painted on the rims for seasonal change). That way if any tire shows any abnormal wear I'll know about it and can take corrective action. Rotating tires will hide any possible defect in the suspension/alignment. Besides, any additional mileage with rotation is too minimal.
 

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I have seen this fact too with a 2011 sienna. After 32K miles, the tread is almost down to the wear bar. The tire I have is Michelin primacy MXV4. It is supposed to last for 60K miles. I think the reason is due to a weight of the minivan ...
 

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I have seen this fact too with a 2011 sienna. After 32K miles, the tread is almost down to the wear bar. The tire I have is Michelin primacy MXV4. It is supposed to last for 60K miles. I think the reason is due to a weight of the minivan ...
I agree - stated wear life is for a typical application, which is less heavily loaded.

Do the math: 2 adults + 2 kids = 2-1/2 tons. Equivalent tires on a 2500-3000 lb car will of course go further.
Well, I don't think that there are any 2500-3000 lb cars with 215/65R16 or 225/60R17 tires, but I agree with the general point: the Sienna's tires are relatively highly loaded for their size.

I, on the other hand, NEVER rotate tires (LF,RF, LR & RR are painted on the rims for seasonal change). That way if any tire shows any abnormal wear I'll know about it and can take corrective action. Rotating tires will hide any possible defect in the suspension/alignment. Besides, any additional mileage with rotation is too minimal.
I only rotate tires once a year (at the seasonal change if I'm using separate summer and winter tires); on the other hand, rotating at least once in the life of the tires does significantly extend their life, because the fronts wear out much faster than the rears.
 

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I agree - stated wear life is for a typical application, which is less heavily loaded.



Well, I don't think that there are any 2500-3000 lb cars with 215/65R16 or 225/60R17 tires, but I agree with the general point: the Sienna's tires are relatively highly loaded for their size.



I only rotate tires once a year (at the seasonal change if I'm using separate summer and winter tires); on the other hand, rotating at least once in the life of the tires does significantly extend their life, because the fronts wear out much faster than the rears.
Conventional wisdom and logic would agree with you. Although my personal experience has not shown this over time with a final difference of only 1/32". I still maintain the NO rotation policy. For stability alone, I want the best tread to be on the rear under any road condition especially on a FWD vehicle.
BTW, my winters are equally marked so they always go back on the same wheel.
 

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The difference between front and rear wear will depend on loading. While we have a few thousand kilometres of driving with a trailer in tow, cargo in the back, and the rear axle at its load limit, we usually have relatively little load in the back - that might be why we see substantially faster front wear. Someone who normally has all the seats full and cargo as well might well find much more evenly matched wear.
 

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... For stability alone, I want the best tread to be on the rear under any road condition especially on a FWD vehicle.
This is fine for those with relatively even front-to-rear wear, although it is based on the idea that the tires with more tread grip better and thus having the deeper tread on the back provides better stability. This is valid in rain and snow, but on dry pavement less tread is also less "squirmy", and transient response will be less stable with more tread on the back.

For more typical vehicles, keeping the deepest tread on the back is fundamentally incompatible with the idea of rotation and makes it impossible to replace tires in full sets without wasting a substantial part of tire life. (I realize this is not the case for orider)

If you have significantly faster front wear and keep the deeper tread on the back, the fronts will always stay on the front until they wear out. At that point if you replace only two tires, they will go on the back and the older tires will be moved to the front. I suppose this is workable if you use the same make and model of tire every time, although most tire models don't stay in production for the life of a vehicle.

BTW, my winters are equally marked so they always go back on the same wheel.
There's no way I would want my tires removed and re-mounted every year, or have my wheels subjected to a tire machine twice a year, so I use a second set of wheels. The second set also means I can to the seasonal swap myself.
 

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I guess we have been lucky. Our 2004 AWD limited has 84,000 miles and we are on our 2nd set of tires. We bought the van used with 36k miles on it and the original run flat tires. Ran those to 46k and changed out for some discount Sumitomo tires. I was just commenting to my wife last week, how well the Sumitomo's are wearing. I see us taking the van to 100k miles on these tires with no issues. I rotate every 5k miles and check tire pressures at each 5k oil change.
Changed the front brakes at about 70k miles, rears still look good. From 36k miles to about 78k miles the van was driven on a very twisty mountain. Twisty enough to cause the stability control to take over in some of the turns. On a side note, I dislike the stability control in our van. It intervenes before it is needed and between the abrupt and aggressive braking and lack of activating the brake lights, I'm surprised it hasn't gotten us rear-ended. Fortunately we don't commute that road anymore.
 

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We bought a new Sienna in the spring of 2004. The original tires were replaced in July, 2007 at 59 000 km, with Costco Michelyns. One of them failed early, 2010 after 60 000 km and I replaced the pair. The other two made it to about 90 000 km in 2012 (a little hard to tell because I started using winter tires in January 2011). The Michelin tires have a 130 000 km warranty so I have to agree the Sienna is hard on tires. 60 000 km is 37 000 miles.

I replaced the front brake pads at 117 000 km. They could have gone a good deal further. We live in a small town and do mostly highway driving which is much easier on brakes than city driving.
 

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We switched out to 225/60/16 and run at 44 PSI front and 40 PSI rear. We also tow a 4000 Lb trailer with WDH. So far so good, and the van feels a bit more stable while towing with the extra width on the tires.
 
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