Toyota Sienna Forum - siennachat.com banner

101 - 112 of 112 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Found out some disturbing news today about certain model year Toyota / Lexus 3.5l V6.

check out this site http://sites.google.com/site/toyotav6oillinescandal/

Apparently Toyota has used a rubber hose external oil line that fails with time and can cause serious engine damage.
I have not visited SiennaChat for a while as busy with work, but this is worth the time. Has anyone experienced this issue with their Sienna's??


TM


EDIT: corrected typo in title to assist accuracy in future searches, and fixed hyperlink
BY: topspy/Mod-Squad

Yep, sure did. About 3 months ago my wife was driving her 2009 Sienna home from work. As she pulled into the driveway I could see engine oil gushing out from under the car. By the time she turned off the engine, most of the 5 quarts were on the driveway and street. Fortunately, no engine damage. A trusted mechanic told me that an oil cooling hose had burst. I later found out, Toyota got rid of the rubber hose for a metal one. Replaced the hose and no problems since. The only problem is, I still can't get that oil stain off of the driveway!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
... The only problem is, I still can't get that oil stain off of the driveway!
I have had some success removing various stubborn automotive fluid stains from my driveway by simply burning them off with my Harbor Freight torch. It's a wicked beast and great caution is required when you turn the flame way up, but man oh man, that thing is like having a jet engine exhaust at your fingertips. It will literally cook down into the surface of concrete and burn off most petroleum based material.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I have had some success removing various stubborn automotive fluid stains from my driveway by simply burning them off with my Harbor Freight torch. It's a wicked beast and great caution is required when you turn the flame way up, but man oh man, that thing is like having a jet engine exhaust at your fingertips. It will literally cook down into the surface of concrete and burn off most petroleum based material.

Thanks, I'll try that!
 

·
Registered
2006 Sienna LE
Joined
·
82 Posts
That will also break down the concrete. You won't see it right away, but the part you have heated will be weakened, and will wear out prematurely.

Better just to hire someone to steam clean it. That won't be hot enough to bother the concrete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I've had good results removing oil stains by spraying the stains with Purple Power a couple times and letting it sit. It doesn't take long for the weather to remove the stain after that.

Our 2008's oil cooler lines got swapped out for metal by the previous owner just before we got the van. The VVT-i oil line became all-metal when I swapped our 2008's engine this past summer for an engine out of a 2012 RAV4. :) (the oil cooler and lines got swapped from the old engine to the new)

There are enough stories about VVT-i line failure and oil cooler line failure that it is worth it to fix them proactively. Oddly, the all-metal lines are cheaper than the ones with rubber. My guess is that Toyota had used the rubber lines to address some kind of assembly line sequence issue.

- G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
That will also break down the concrete. You won't see it right away, but the part you have heated will be weakened, and will wear out prematurely.

Better just to hire someone to steam clean it. That won't be hot enough to bother the concrete.
Well, I've been doing it for the last 20+ years without a single issue on the concrete. IDK what issues you've seen, but it has not been a problem in the least for me.
$.02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Has any one just replaced the rubber hose part you can access on either the vvt or oil cooler hose?

High quality stainless braided oil hose is available from any hot rod or race car parts supplier.

Back in the day I crashed my 1992 Gsxr750. It was a nice bike before that. After collecting the insurance payout and selling the rest of the intact body work I did a hooligan bike rebuild for nearly $500. So cash in my pocket ahead I further cheaped out and used a B&M universal transmission cooler in place of the broken stock oil cooler that used factory bolt together fittings. I figured trans cooler line and hose clamps were sufficient.
Not only did it fail once but twice. The second time was a high side crash on a twisty mountain road with a passenger because the massive oil leak on the rear tire. I finally leaned that standard rubber line was insufficient. The replacement hose was a bulk roll of stainless braided 3/8” hose and double hose clamps. Worked great for the many years I owned that bike.

So anyone out there use maybe 5/8” hose for oil cooler and maybe 3/8” for vvt line.

I can’t tell on my 07’ if the vvt line is original or not. It has yellowish writing on it. Oil cooler still has metal-rubber-metal supply-return pipe.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
Sure, you can try anything. Remember that this is not a pressure burst issue, but a rubber 'meltdown' due to chemical action. If you use metal braided rubber that is still not up to the task, it will still piss oil, just not as rapidly. But why not just do it right?

I had the original hose replaced with the Viton hose under the recall. I still feel that this would probably have been sufficient, but when I had the opportunity I went ahead with replacing that with the full metal line that was standard on the 2009 or 2010 model.

The lower oil cooler line rubber/metal is a more complex crimped assembly, IIRC, and not amenable to disassembly and partial replacement. Again, for not a whole lot more work you can just replace the entire thing with the newer all-metal part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hi All,
I have a 2007 Sienna 105K miles with the updated vvti rear bank hose identified with the yellow marking, but its original to the van as I don't recall them doing this work to the van as I seldom take it into the dealership for work. I would like to purchase a new hose part so I can replace it myself versus going thru the hassle of the full metal line install. Does anyone sell just the hose, if so does anyone have the part number and where to purchase it? Perhaps I will have to purchase the whole metal line and remove the hose from it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
I have had some success removing various stubborn automotive fluid stains from my driveway by simply burning them off with my Harbor Freight torch. It's a wicked beast and great caution is required when you turn the flame way up, but man oh man, that thing is like having a jet engine exhaust at your fingertips. It will literally cook down into the surface of concrete and burn off most petroleum based material.

I tried this with mixed results. If you have not done this before you may heat the area too hot and the concrete will explode...ask me how I know. If you try this best to heat till you see some vaporization , back off a few then reapply a few. When I was done it looked worse as the oil assumed a caramelized look. My tenants with their oil leaking vehicles basically ruined the looks of the driveway and I eventually painted it with epoxy paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Hi All,
I have a 2007 Sienna 105K miles with the updated vvti rear bank hose identified with the yellow marking, but its original to the van as I don't recall them doing this work to the van as I seldom take it into the dealership for work. I would like to purchase a new hose part so I can replace it myself versus going thru the hassle of the full metal line install. Does anyone sell just the hose, if so does anyone have the part number and where to purchase it? Perhaps I will have to purchase the whole metal line and remove the hose from it.
The better quality hose would not have been on your van since it was new in 2006/2007. If it indeed has the upgraded hose, it would have been replaced at some point.

There at least used to be a TSB-specific service part available for just the hose: 04009-33131

Best to go with the all-metal line, if you're up for removing the P/S pump for access. (and, the metal line may even be cheaper than the replacement hose!)

- G
 
101 - 112 of 112 Posts
Top